Skillet Matzoh Brei with Cinnamon, Apple, and Raisins

kosher dessert recipes, kosher recipes

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Skillet Matzoh Brei with Cinnamon, Apple, and Raisins

No Comments 21 March 2010

Recipe Ingredients

Serves 4

Directions

  1. Place matzos in a bowl, and cover with water. Place a plate on surface to keep matzos submerged. Let stand for 5 minutes, and drain. Return to bowl.
  2. Whisk eggs and salt together in a small bowl. Add to matzo. Add sugar, apple, raisins, cinnamon, and 1/2 cup oil. Gently stir until combined.
  3. Heat remaining 2 tablespoons oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Spread matzo mixture evenly in skillet, pressing firmly into pan. Cook, undisturbed, for 5 minutes. Carefully flip with a spatula, 1 piece at a time. (The mixture will break into 3 or 4 pieces.) Cook until golden brown, about 5 minutes. Spoon onto serving plates. Serve hot or warm with toppings if desired.

This recipe comes from Gita Edelsburg, the mother-in-law of Monita Buchwald, recipe tester at Martha Stewart Living.

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Glass Dishes – A Passover Round Up

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Glass Dishes – A Passover Round Up

2 Comments 21 March 2010

This is my first Passover that I will actually have to kosher my own kitchen. So I am on the prowl for some beautiful glass dishes that I can use year round for meat and milk, as well as for the holiday.

Here is a round up of my favorite glass dinner sets from across the web…

1. Crate & Barrel Mallorca Dinnerware

These are more textured than your average glass dish, but still very casual. At this price, these are great for every day dinnertime with your kids.

Cost: $3.95 - $4.95

2. Crate & Barrel Orion Dinnerware

Cost: $6.95 - $7.95

These have a rumpled recycled look. Very cool with linen and woven wood chargers.

3. Horchow’s Vetro Dinnerware

A super elegant set. These dishes are Fancy, with a capital F.

Cost: $281.00 - $352.00

4. Target’s La Rochere Bee Glass Collection

Cute and country.

Cost: $31.49 - $134.99

5. Libbey Tempo Square Dinnerware Collection

Go for a crisp look with a square dish.

Cost: $29.74 - $31.49

6. Colin Cowie 12–pc. Gold–Trimmed Textured Glass Dinnerware Set

Cost is: $149.99

For the price, these are really a score. A gold rimmed dish is timeless.

$149.99

7. VivaTerra Serene Sol Recycled Glass Dinnerware

Cost is: $39.00 - $198.00

Go for an eco-chic look with this recycled glass set.

8. Amazon’s Classica Glass Dishes

Patterned glass plates have the elegance of your grandmother’s crystal, at a fraction of the cost.

Cost: $27.00 for 20 piece set

9. Dishes by Riverside Designs from Terrestera

Cost: $26.00

Green glass evokes memories of sea-glass… Casual but graceful.

10. Belmont Clear Beaded Plate

This is a classic, cant go wrong glass dish. The beaded edge adds detail, but this plate is no fuss, no muss.

Cost: $92.00 for 4

Happy Passover!

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Tips For A Kid Friendly Seder

kids

Tips For A Kid Friendly Seder

1 Comment 21 March 2010

Its easy to forget that the seder is really all about passing down our traditions to our children amidst the hustle and bustle of planning for the holidays.  My sister-in-law always makes the seder fun for the little kids by buying plastic bugs and frogs from Oriental Trading Company. She then asks Passover questions and whichever kid answers first-she throws them a bug or a frog! (bugs and frogs represent some of  the ten plagues) They love it!

Please check out chabad.og for a wealth of information about Jewish life and holidays! (Photo from: chabad.org / Reprinted from Chabad.org.)

When your Passover table is filled with boisterous youngsters who get fidgety before it’s time to recite the Ma Nishtana, the evening may begin to feel longer than those infamous years of slavery in Egypt, and filled with more tears than the salt water intended.

But don’t fret; your liberation from bondage is closer than you think. The following offers a guide of creative ideas for frazzled parents who seek to inspire every kind of child, including the wise one, the simple one, the one who is too young to ask and, well, I’m not even going to mention the fourth one.

Don’t forget to invite your children to share.

First, you have to set the scene; I always make my table child-friendly by setting the table with Passover paraphernalia such as plastic frogs, red water colored with red wine or grape juice (blood), sunglasses (darkness), ping pong balls (hail), masks and other and plague-related odds and ends.

Just as you invite all of those who are hungry, don’t forget to invite your children to share. Welcome your children to bring their ownHaggadahs to the table and share what they have learned with everyone else.

As you set your table with your finest Passover china and crystal, don’t leave out the most important display – the handmade pillows, sederplates and crafts your progeny created in school this year and in previous years.

Try to reward good questions, singing, readings and stories with something special. This way, they will pay attention to the proper place in the Haggadah. I have found that this technique keeps everyone alert.

Some people charge the children at their seder with the task of producing a Pesach-related skit. All the children can be given a part to play from the Haggadah, along with props, such as toy frogs and plastic bugs to add more realism and dramatic flair. The activity has the added benefit of requiring a certain amount of planning away from the table, affording the adults an opportunity for higher level conversation.

Some have the custom of marching around the table with either a piece of matza or a heavy load of items on their back. This helps us to fulfill the mitzvah of the Seder, which requires us to feel and act as if we have personally experienced liberation from slavery. Similarly, some people dress up like slaves and walk around the table to reenact the Jews‘ Exodus from Egypt. But you don’t have to end with your journeys through the dessert around your table.

A scavenger hunt through the Haggadah will also keep everyone on their toes; you can give your seder participants a list of words or characters to find as they read through the Haggadah.

One family I know ends their seder with an energetic round of the song “Who Knows One,” complete with elaborate hand motions. It certainly helped that they drank four cups of wine first!

When children are involved in seder preparations, it gives them a sense of ownership.

Generating enthusiasm for the seder can begin before the matzah and herbs are even brought to the table. When children are involved in seder preparations, it gives them a sense of ownership in the event. There are little jobs you can give them to help prepare, such as getting the salt water and bitter herbs ready. It may even encourage them to stick around at the table longer.

One family I know prepares a treasure hunt in advance, with clues to finding their missing afikomen. The adults are forced to participate whether they like it or not because without the afikomen, the seder cannot be completed.

If you successfully follow some of the suggestions above, you might get the ultimate compliment at the end of the meal. The children just might say, “Next Year–at your table–in Jerusalem.”

Other suggestions:

  • Paper bag dramatics. You can make parts of the Haggadah come alive by giving kids a bag of random materials. They must act out the part of the Haggadah using the materials. This can be done for the Ten Plagues as well.
  • Make the Ten Plagues come alive by throwing something out on the table for each one. For blood, put colored cups of water around the table. For frogs, throw around little toy frogs, etc.
  • Act out traditional Passover songs, such as Dayenu.
  • Dress up in robes or sheets to create the look of slaves.
  • Create a scavenger hunt out of the frogs that you have hidden around the house during the day.
  • Jump over a low bucket filled with water to recreate the splitting of the sea.
  • Get some sacks for the kids to pull around; fill with water bottles and then reenact the exodus from Egypt.
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How to Create Your Own Elegant Seder Centerpiece

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How to Create Your Own Elegant Seder Centerpiece

1 Comment 21 March 2010

By Claudia Bildirici

Its so easy to craft your own centerpiece for the holidays. Your guests will think you hired a florist!

During theseder,  I like to have the seder plate set upon a bowl with floating flowers, so it can be revealed when  the eldest girl removes the seder plate from the table, (a yearly tradition).

Follow these simple instructions- please let me know if you have any questions! Just post a comment below!

Buy

-a round oasis ring at any flower shop 12″

-one bunch green roses

-1 bunch daisys

-1 bunch of any pretty green filler

Cost

-flowers – $18.00

-oasis ring -2 for $12.00

More

-Soak the oasis for a couple of hours using a large tin

-Trim the roses and daisys leaving only about one inch of stem

Now this is the fun part!

-Just stick the flowers in any order you want.

-I placed the rose one by one  to cover the oasis, then  I placed the daisies.

-Before I knew it the whole thing was full and gorgeous!

-I tried not to place flowers on the inside of the oasis …Knowing I was placing a bowl in the center

-Place a bowl in the middle of the ring.

-Fill the bowl with a little water and float flowers in the bowl.

-You are now going to top this with the seder plate.

When you remove the seder plate from the table you still have a  gorgeous centerpiece on your table!

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Sephardic Hagaddahs for Your Seder

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Sephardic Hagaddahs for Your Seder

1 Comment 20 March 2010

If you are a Sephardic Jew, or are attending a Sephardic Seder here is a great

selection of Sephardic Hagaddahs as well as other Passover items and gifts.

The top two images are content  images from the Sephardic Illuminated Hagaddah.They are designed, painted and handwritten in watercolor by Benjamin Hassan. The design are inspired by architectural details from synagogues around the world.Each copy is $500 and is a limited edition of 613 copies.

The Hagaddas pictured pictured below are much more affordable at prices ranging from $9.95 and up.


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No Cost Instant Calm #3

healthy living, healthy mind

No Cost Instant Calm #3

No Comments 20 March 2010

A freebie. No cost instant calm.

Excerpts from the soon to be published  The Calm Book , by Tzirelchana,mom and writer devoted to promoting world calmness.

Where ever you are, you can always breath, not unconscious automatic oxygen inhalation, but real breathing. A cleansing breath, a yogic breath which studies say can even lower blood pressure.

Today, I was out racing around  town in a mad dash to collect the endless jigsaw puzzle of stuff that my family seems to require to get to this holiday. I started out energized, excited. Shopping does turn me on, but at some point in the spree, I could feel my mind, my heart and ever other part of me were in overdrive.

When I finally over a fast food lunch with the kids (yes, I know that  fast food isn’t exactly tofu and herbal tea, but the kids were starved and I aint perfect) I closed my eyes and treated myself to a couple of good deep breaths whispering my favorite mantra.

‘Breathe in Hashem… Breathe out fear… Breathe in Hashem… Breathe out fear”

I did this and over for two or three minutes until I could feel the calm pouring into me from some mysterious relaxation center hidden deep inside my brain.

Instant calm. Instantly accessible. No cost.

Click and Pick – WIN 3 great cookbooks! HERE

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The Best Kids Passover Books Ever

kids

The Best Kids Passover Books Ever

1 Comment 20 March 2010

We’ve scoured Amazon.com for the best kids Passover books on the market.

Buy them as Seder gifts, or just to make someone you love feel special.

Win the book of your choice by commenting below!

Just tell us which one is your favortite!!

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No Mess Fish in Parchment Paper

kosher fish recipes, kosher pareve recipes, kosher recipes

No Mess Fish in Parchment Paper

4 Comments 20 March 2010

This gourmet- practically fat-free recipe will be a hit with your family or for entertaining on the holidays. Because you dont even need a pot, its a no-brainer for weeknights. If you use this recipe for Passover, make sure your parchment paper is marked Kosher for Passover, as some have an invisible coating of flour on top.

Recipe Ingredients:

    1. Any flat fish such as fillet of sole or dover sole.
    2. Assorted vegetables such as  cherry tomatoes, french string beans, radishes, red peppers.
    3. Kalamata olives add great flavor.
    4. Lemon zest- check out the video for tips on zesting
  • Pour 1 teaspoon of olive oil on a 12″ round piece of parchment paper and spread with a brush.
  • Place fish skin side down
  • season with salt and pepper
  • surround with vegetables
  • add lemon zest on top
  • seal pouch  beginning from end that is toward you. Watch how Adam does it!
  • Make sure its an air tight seal.
  • Place on a sheet pan in a pre-heated 425 degree oven for 10-15 minutes.
  • It should be brown and puffy Enjoy!
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The Calm Book- Daily Meditations for a Jewish Mom

healthy living, healthy mind

The Calm Book- Daily Meditations for a Jewish Mom

No Comments 20 March 2010

Excerpts from the soon to be published  The Calm Book , by Tzirelchana,mom and writer devoted to promoting world calmness.

We recently started a new year. Yes, according to the Mishna, Rosh Hodesh Nissan, the first day of the month of Nissan is the new year for festivals and kings and aren’t all we Jews royal, all of us Jewish women princesses. To me, the idea of starting the year during the spring  feels intuitively right.

Aside from Pesach cleaning, a great way to celebrate is to de-clutter. . De-cluttering is like dieting except you can eat as much as you like while your house loses the weight. And you find such interesting stuff. Calendars from 2006, and 5 and 4, math tests, going back at least a decade, and not to mentional ties of any size, jackets with shoulder pads to fit a linebacker, expired medicines…

Right now, I’m preaching but I’m not practicing. Decluttering just doesn’t seem so royal. Does Queen Elizabeth go round Balmoral or Windsor filling giant hefy bags? Still I  know its what I need to do and though the prospect makes me yawn—I’d rather be writing or painting, So here’s a start. A procrastinator’s prayer.

: Dear G-d, make we want to get the junk out of my house and out of my soul. And then help me to do it.Amen.

The Calm Book- Post #2

You heard it through the grapevine, that your niece or sister or first cousin became a Kallah or a mother…None of the baalei simcha the primary parties, who happened to be your very closest relatives actually  phoned to inform you..

Though  you are  happy, your primary emotion is hurt.  You sulk. You feel sorry for yourself. You may even speak badly of the people who didn’t tell you—what kind of a family is this anyway? And how did you end up in it?

You know that you have to give them the benefit of the doubt so you think up excuses, reasons why they didn’t call, the time difference, telephone troubles, too overwhelmed, but the hurt has settled in your heart. You can’t seem to pry it lose.

You unload to your journal or your therapist or your friend and you have a good cry.

Families. We have expectations. Of how things should be. Of how we should be treated..

Lets reframe. Consider, really consider that the ba’alei simcha aren’t out to get you. That they have good reasons for not phoning yet.

Before my own nieces’s shidduch was finalized. I heard about it through a third party. I figured that my brother didn’t care about me enough to call and  I  hurt, needlessly.The shidduch wasn’t final yet. He didn’t want to tell anyone until it was a done deal and he was quite right to keep quiet.

Now, I’m going to do teshuva,. Whenever something like this happens, I will just keep still and wait. More shall be revealed.

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Peanut Brittle

kosher recipes

Peanut Brittle

No Comments 20 March 2010

perfect after dinner treat

Need a quick gift to bring to the seder?

There’s no need to run out to buy a last minute gift! Peanut brittle is an american classic that is loved by all. This recipe is inspired by the book, Sweet Tempation by Nicki Trench.

What makes it extra easy is that all you need is:

2 cups of sugar,

2 tablespoons of corn syrup,

1 cup of any kind of nut-roasted lightly

finely grated zest of an orange (optional)

Directions

1-Preheat oven to 350 degrees

2- Put sugar and corn syrup in heavy saucepan and heat with low flame until sugar has dissolved and reaches 270 degrees on a candy thermometer stirring continuously. (Honestly- I didnt have a candy thermometer handy so I just heated it till it was caramel consistency). Remove saucepan from flame and stir in nuts (and optional orange zest).

3-Pour syrup into a jelly roll pan and flatten with a spoon. Let cool.

4-When solid, break off pieces and store in an airtight container or wrap in cellophane bags and tie with a decorative ribbon or raffia.

-NOTE -This recipe contains corn, which is permissable for Sephardic Jews. Please consult with your rabbi.

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An Afikoman Bag to Make With Your Kids

kids

An Afikoman Bag to Make With Your Kids

No Comments 20 March 2010

Its easy to get wrapped up in Passover planning and forget the real purpose of the holiday. Our kids. The memories we create year by year are what they carry with them forever. So, as I started planning my Passover menu, I put down my pen and said to Sarah, “Lets make a Pesach craft.”  Inspired by Kaboose,we gathered some

    • watercolor paints
    • watercolor paper
    • ribbon or raffia
    • hole punch
    • watecolor pencils
    • stencils
    • kosher salt
  1. Cut  a large piece of watercolor paper into 2 large pieces- about 11×13 inches.
  2. Mix your watercolors paints with water to create the colors of your choice.
  3. Spray or spread a thin layer of water on top of the watercolor paper. Blot it slightly with a paper towel so its not too wet.
  4. Paint and splatter paints onto the watercolor paper to your hearts content, letting the colors bleed onto each other.
  5. Sprinkle some kosher salt on top of the colors, the effects are fun to watch.
  6. When dry, stencil the words afikoman in English or Hebrew on a separate piece of watercolor paper using watercolor pencils. Watercolor pencils are fun to use. After drawing your design, wet the design with a brush and watch a mere colored pencil drawing turn into a watercolor design.

  1. You can also stencil flowers or any other design on a separate paper.
  2. Punch holes approximately 2 inches apart along the perimeters of both pages along 3 sides of the pages in order to leave an opening for the afikoman.
  3. Make sure the holes on both pages line up!
  4. Thread a ribbon or raffia through the holes- its a great sewing lesson for little kids!
  5. Make a knot or bow at the end.
  6. Glue the Afikoman words, and your other stencil embellishments onto one of the painted papers.
  7. Enjoy your child’s masterpiece!
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Rolling Yebrat the Easy Way

kosher recipes

Rolling Yebrat the Easy Way

No Comments 19 March 2010

Price $25. If you order before Passover, $20.

Every week I look forward to the sweet , tangy, gooey flavors of Yebrat on the Friday night table. The meat and rice filling is infused with spices and rolled  tightly to perfection inside a grape leaf .  This task is easier said than done.  I always dreaded rolling yebrat because I could never get them all to look like “soldiers in a tray” (to quote my mother). Now, a new gadget imported directly from the bazaars in Turkey has arrived in the heart of Brooklyn.

This gadget was almost impossible to find. I searched for months and months by calling all of these Middle Eastern specialty stores around the country.

It finally arrived! After a few minutes of trying to understand the Turkish instructions and diagrams it comes with, I figured out how to roll the yebra. It was amazing!!!! In seconds it rolled the grape leaf as tight as it can be. I am a perfectionist and the best part is they all came out the same width and length.

This yebra roller has 3 levels of thicknesses to chose from depending on the type of food you are rolling. It also works with
stuffed cabbage, spring rolls, meat filled cigars or anything else that rolls into that shape. Unless you’re planning a visit to the Turkish Bazaar, call to get this gadget today. Price $25. If you order before Passover, $20. Call
Donna Anzaroot at (917) 439 9917 or e-mail at mailto:donna9970@aol.com.

Watch the Video of the gadget roller in action!  http://thejewishhostess.com/2010/03/watch-the-yebra-roller-gadget-in-action/

Yebra roller has 3 levels of thicknesses to chose from

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Tackle the Chaos in your Kids Room

kids

Tackle the Chaos in your Kids Room

No Comments 18 March 2010

Its the time of year that you’ve been dreading, but have no fear!

We’ve scoured the internet for the coolest in kids boxes, containers, and items to organize the stuff in your kids rooms that they REALLY want to keep.

Just click on the pics to purchase!

My favorite kids storage site was The Land of Nod- their selection was by far the greatest.

Although, I’ve chosen the brightly colored storage items, they have adorable nursery storage bins in pastels.

If your drawer space is tight these hanging storage shelves are a lifesaver-

These mini-drawers are great for school and craft supplies-

These stackable cubes can be found at Modern Seed

Kids should always have books to read  that are at eye level-

I love these recycled filpflop bins from VivaTerra !

These modern bins are sure to do the trick from My Urban Child

The following items can be purchased at Clever Tomato

Great for books and educational toys -

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DIY Charoset for Junior Chefs

kids, kosher pareve recipes, kosher recipes

DIY Charoset for Junior Chefs

1 Comment 17 March 2010

Joan Nathan, author of  Jewish Cooking in America, is the go to author on traditional Jewish cooking. She also has a wonderful childrens’ book,  The Children’s Jewish Holiday Kitchen, where I found this simple to do Haroset recipe.

  • 8 apples
  • 2/3 cup almonds
  • 3 tablespoons sugar, or to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • Grated rind of 1 lemon
  • 4 tablespoons sweet red wine

Equipment

  • Measuring cup
  • Measuring spoons
  • Vegetable peeler
  • Knife
  • Wooden chopping bowl
  • Old-fashioned chopper or food processor

Preparation

Child: Peel the apples and cut them in quarters, removing the core. Using your chopping bowl and chopper, chop together all the ingredients. The apples and almonds should be about the size of the chunks in chunky peanut butter. Add red wine to taste.

  • Coconut covered Date/Nut Balls (rawlivingfoods.typepad.com)
  • Banana Avocado Crème Bars (rawlivingfoods.typepad.com)
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kosher meat recipes, kosher recipes

Kosher Contessa: Rack of Lamb Persillade

No Comments 17 March 2010

The Barefoot Contessa is one of the most talked about chefs nowadays. Her recipes are easy to do, and the end result looks as if you were slaving away in the kitchen. While many of her recipes mix dairy and meat, they can be adapted to fit our kosher lifestyle.

Rack of Lamb Persillade

Adapted from Barefoot in Paris

Persillade refers to a combination of minced fresh parsley and garlic that’s added to a dish near the end of the cooking.

Serves 4

2 racks of Lamb, Frenched

Good Olive Oil

2 teaspoons Kosher Salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

2 cups loosely packed fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves, rinsed well and dried

1 tablespoon chopped garlic (about 3 cloves)

4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted margarine, melted

1 cup matzoh meal crumbs

2 teaspoons grated lemon zest (2 lemons)

Directions

Preheat oven to 450 degrees

1. Place both racks of lamb in a roasting pan, fat side up. Rub the tops with the olive oil and sprinkle with the salt and pepper. Roast the lamb for ten minutes.

2. Meanwhile, place the parsley, garlic, and margarine in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the steel blade and process until finely minced. Add the matzoh meal and lemon zest and process for a second until combined. Taste mixture and adjust seasoning if necessary.

3. Take the lamb out of the oven and quickly press the parsley mixture on top of the meat. Return immediately to the

oven and roast for another 15-20 minutes.

4. Remove lamb out of the oven and cover with aluminum foil. Allow it to rest for 15 minutes, cut in double chops, and serve.


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Triple Raspberry Sauce

kosher dessert recipes, kosher pareve recipes, kosher recipes

Triple Raspberry Sauce

1 Comment 17 March 2010

There are so many great recipes that can be made for Passover - you just have to be a little creative. This raspberry sauce is perfect for passover and all year round. It can dress up any passover cake into something special, and looks great drizzled over a meringue. Mix it into yogurt with mixed berries for a beautiful parfait, or alongside your cheesecake It’s also great for entertaining because it can be made a day or two in advance. This is one recipe that will take you very far!

Triple Raspberry Sauce:

Adapted from The Barefoot Contessa

  • 1 half-pint fresh raspberries
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 cup seedless raspberry jam (12-ounce jar)

Place the raspberries, sugar and 1/4 cup water in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil, lower the heat, and simmer for 4 minutes. Pour the cooked raspberries and the jam into the bowl of a food processor fitted with a steel blade and process until smooth. Chill.

To serve, spoon some of the raspberry sauce on a small plate. Place meringue or cake on top of sauce and garnish with mixed fresh berries, and drizzle with more sauce.

Yield: 2 cups

As a variation to this recipe you can add 1 tablespoon of  a fruit flavored liqueur just for a little extra flavor. I have not found any liqueurs that are kosher for Passover but if you do please let us know!

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