Whip Up Your Own Frozen Treat Today!

kosher dessert recipes, kosher pareve recipes, kosher recipes

Whip Up Your Own Frozen Treat Today!

1 Comment 25 May 2010

You don’t have to risk a $75 parking ticket just to run in to get your Frogurt, Tasti, or Pinkberry.  This dairy-free frozen treat is  homemade , 100 percent fruit, and practically free.  Chopped nuts add crunch and protein to this creamy snack. Artificial afternoon treats melt in comparison to this “banana fro-yo” adapted from one of our  favorite sites, Skinny In The City.


Total Prep Time: 2-3 hours (freezing bananas)

Total Cook Time:
5-7 minutes

Serves: 1

Ingredients:
* 2 small sized frozen bananas (approx 6”), peeled and cut into chunks
* ½ oz (1/8th cup or 12 almonds) raw almonds, chopped

Equpiment:

Food Processor

Directions:
1. Cut bananas into chunks and place in freezer until frozen (approximately 2 to 3 hours.)
2. Take the bananas and put them in your food processor.
3. Turn the processor on and let it run for about five to seven minutes, stopping every now and then to scrape it down. (The bananas should get increasingly light, fluffy, and smooth, resembling a creamy bowl of soft serve.)
4. Scoop them into a bowl, sprinkle ½ oz chopped raw almonds on top and enjoy!

*For an extra treat drizzle one half teaspoon chocolate syrup on top!

Nutrition Content:
Per Serving with Almonds (approx 1 cup): 262 calories, 7.5g fat, 49g carb, 7g fiber, 5g protein, 2mg sodium, 45g calcium, 826mg potassium

Nutrition Content:
Per Serving without Almonds (approx 1 cup): 180 calories, .5g fat, 46g carb, 5g fiber, 2g protein, 2mg sodium, 10mg calcium, 732mg potassium


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Hats Off To Life!

kosher recipes

Hats Off To Life!

1 Comment 25 May 2010

“Be the change you wish to see in the world”-Eleanor Roosevelt

There are life events that change us forever.

Using all of her inner resources, Margie Bijou was able to transform heart wrenching grief  into a positive energy that has added  to the  joy and glamour of hundreds of weddings and Bar-Mitzvahs.

In her own words, this is Margie’s story:



Chapter One: Ezra Abraham:

“My Mom called me one day and told me that my 16 year old cousin Eddie  was going in for a biopsy of a cyst on his knee. It wasn’t a big deal but she was just wanted to make me aware. (Ironically on ER that week, there was a girl who was a soccer star who came into the ER with a sprained knee and walked out with an amputation due to a tumor in her lower leg.) So I told my mom that she shouldn’t ever assume anything.I repeated the epsiode details and she shouted some line in arabic which meant “HOW DARE YOU EVEN BREATHE such negativity!!!!!!!

I still remember the email my dad had printed for us that told us Eddie had at the most 3 months to live. He was 16.
We weren’t the closest of cousins. My uncle had moved his family to New Jersey and as hard as it is to be close with my family that lives a block away, its is 4 billion times harder when they live in another state.
I only got to know Eddie because of his illness..

Chapter Two:  Sherri
My cousin was having a Bar Mitzvah for her son and needed a hat to complete her outfit. Of course, none were to be found across the entire tri-state area, so I decided to search the net. I got hooked on Ebay and started buying every vintage hat that  I could find. Federal Express showed up at my door every day for 2 months and the hat boxes started to stack up underneath the baby grand  piano…..About 200 hats later I finally found something in the same vicinity of the green we needed. A veil arrived. I sewed it and made it to fit…..Ah finally the outfit was complete.

A week later I received a frantic phonecall from  Sherri whose son’s bar-mitzvah was in three days. “Margie- my dog Othello jumped onto the dining room table and chewed my hat up into a thousand little pieces!!”

Two minutes later, Sherri showed up at my door with the chewed up remains of two months of searching hours online and a over a thousand dollars in useless old hats.
It was a catastrophe!!
The next day an idea popped into my head. I ran out and bought a green kippah and sewed it back together.I still remember sitting at the dining room table pushing the needle throught the suede and into my fingers…
After 4 hrs I had reconstructed it to what it looked like before (except for a few teeth marks).
Othello was sent to live with a very nice family in the country and Sherri looked like a supermodel!

About a year later I moved into a new house and the hats were packed into bins and stuffed into a closet way up on the 3rd floor.

Chapter Three: Fate

One week after mothers day in 2005 , my mothers only sister, my aunt Merle died of melanoma on her lung. She had been only just diagnosed 6 months before. That same October of that year,  2 days before Yom Kippur, my fathers mother, grandma Margie died.

Two days after that,my cousin Eddie succumbed to a 7 year battle with rhabdomyocarcessarcoma.

Not something you see every day. My uncle Irwin sat shiva for his mother and son in the same week.

What a crazy year.

These tragedies inspired me to want to make every day of my life meaningful and not to waste one moment of the precious time that we have.

When Eddie passed away, my Aunt Susan gave me his hats that he wore during his illness to add my collection. It was then that the idea to lend out the hats to raise money for his foundation came to me. He motivated me to want to give back to others.”

Chapter Four: Hats Off To Life

A room in my home has been converted into a “Hat Room” where many Jewish women of all ages try on gorgeous hats  and have a great time till they find just the right one!

The majority of the women that come in, are ones I have never even met or seen before, yet we bond as we try on dozens of hats…of course they bring over their  possible choices of outfits, shoes, and accessories, and  together we assemble their beautiful look for their momentous day.

Through out the last few years  I have accumulated many many stories some funny, some sad…and some just out of control!  Some days I seriously feel like a bartender and and not only  do I decorate ladie’s heads ,but  I also listen to what’s in their hearts as well…

Our hats are part of a private collection that consists of mostly vintage dress hats.Many of the hats have also been donated by people that don’t have a need for them anymore.

People are sharing! Women are calling other women to borrow hats. Designers are  calling me to donate their hats.

People are giving more than just money, they are giving of themselves.

Continue Reading

Decadent Chocolate Mousse

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Decadent Chocolate Mousse

No Comments 19 May 2010

Best Chocolate Mousse Ever!

By: PASKEZ

This is a great passover dessert. It can be served along side the strawberry fluff, and for all year around put it in a pie shell with whipped cream on top. IMPORTANT NOTE: This recipe is best made a day or even 2 ahead of serving.

Dress up a simple drinking glass by putting a plate underneath. Serve extra cream and berries on the side.

Recipe Ingredients:
5 oz. Paskez chocolate chips (1 cup)
6 eggs separated
dash of salt
4 Tablespoons sugar
Melt chocolate over a double boiler.
Separate eggs. Beat whites and sugar. Set Aside.
Combine yolks, vanilla, salt, and slowly blend into chocolate.
Carefully fold chocolate into whites. Refrigerate until ready to serve.
Serving Notes:
I like to serve my mousse individually. Use any glass on hand.
Layer the mousse and whipped cream or just top the mousse with the strawberry fluff.
Garnish with a lady finger, chocolate shavings, or fresh strawberries.

Modernize this traditional dessert with a square shaped glass. Garnish with a simple cookie and a mint sprig.



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Wild Arugula Salad with Papaya and Avocado

kosher pareve recipes, kosher recipes, kosher salad recipes

Wild Arugula Salad with Papaya and Avocado

No Comments 16 May 2010

by Renee Safdiah- check out  Renee’s hand knit baby hats at Saturday Knit Fever . To order email Renee at saturdayknitfever@yahoo.com.

This salad is so gourmet yet so easy to make. Add it to any holiday table.

Ingredients:

3/4 lb. Wild Arugula, gently washed and dried

1/2 Large Papaya or 2 Small Papayas, cubed

2 Hass Avocados, cubed

Fresh Lime Juice, from about 3 limes

Cilantro, finely chopped

Dressing

Juice of 2 Limes

1/3 cup Extra Virgin Olive OIl

1/2 tsp. Salt

Dash of Sriracha or Hot Sauce

Directions:

Place Papaya and Avocado in a bowl and gently toss with the lime juice. Marinate for a minimum of 30 minutes.

Gently toss Wild Arugula with dressing and arrange on serving platter. Top with Papaya and Avocado mixture.

Sprinkle chopped Cilantro over the fruit.

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White House Fruit and Oat Bars

kids, kosher dessert recipes

White House Fruit and Oat Bars

1 Comment 14 May 2010

Even if you aren’t lucky enough to have your own White House pastry chef,

your kids can still have a taste of  what the Obama girls snack on.

Try this yummy fruit bar taste tested by Michelle Obama herself, who has practically banished white sugar and white flour

from the White House kids menu.

(recipe reprint from The New York Times

read more about the White House pastry chef written by Julia Moskin)

Time: About 50 minutes, plus time for cooling

6 tablespoons grapeseed oil, or other neutral oil, plus extra for brushing pan

2 cups rolled oats

1/2 cup mixed seeds, such as pumpkin, sunflower and sesame

1/2 cup honey

1/3 cup dark brown sugar

1/3 cup maple syrup

Pinch of salt

1 1/2 cups mixed dried fruit, such as raisins, cherries, apricots, papaya, pineapple and cranberries (at least 3 kinds, cut into small pieces if large)

1 teaspoon ground cardamom or cinnamon.

1. Heat oven to 350 degrees. Line a 9-inch-square baking pan with parchment paper or foil, letting a few inches hang over side of pan. Brush with oil.

2. Spread oats and seeds on another baking pan and toast in oven just until golden and fragrant, 6 to 8 minutes, shaking pan once.

3. In a saucepan, combine oil, honey, brown sugar, maple syrup and salt. Stir over medium heat until smooth and hot. In a mixing bowl, toss together toasted oats and seeds, dried fruit and cardamom. Pour hot sugar mixture over and stir until well combined.

4. While mixture is warm, transfer to prepared pan, pressing into pan evenly with an offset spatula.

5. Bake until brown, 25 to 30 minutes. Transfer pan to a rack and let cool completely. Using the overhanging foil or paper, lift out of pan and place on a work surface. Cut into bars, about 1 1/2 inches by 3 inches.

Yield: 2 dozen bars.

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Shavuot- Everything You Always Wanted to Know

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Shavuot- Everything You Always Wanted to Know

No Comments 12 May 2010

Ever wanted to know Shavuot was all about, in your own terms? We found this tasty little Shavuot Digest from one of our favorite sites for fellow Jews-

Tablet.com.- A New Read on Jewish Life.

Its everything you wanted to know about our favorite holiday, from why we eat Cheesecake to the Book of Ruth’s juicy plot lines!

Enjoy!

WHAT’S IT ALL ABOUT?

It’s the day the Israelites got the Torah. As you may recall, they left Egypt in a bit of a hurry, and therefore it took some weeks until they were ready to attend to the business of receiving the word of God and become the official Chosen People. How many weeks? Seven, the Hebrew word for which, sheva, shares a root with the word Shavuot, which means weeks. To mark the occasion of having received the divine laws, we do what Jewish mothers everywhere would have us do year-round: study all night long.

Together with Passover and Sukkot, the holiday is also one of the Three Pilgrimages (or shalosh regalim, if you want to rock the Hebrew), annual occasions for the ancient Israelites to bring their harvest and livestock over to the Temple in Jerusalem for festivities and ritualistic slaughter. And while the pilgrimage part was abandoned—you know, exile and all—we still mark these three major holidays with special recitations of the joyous Hallel prayer.

ANY BAD GUYS?

Surprisingly, none. It’s one of those Jewish holidays without an awesome villain. Which is also why it’s one of those Jewish holidays not yet turned into a major Hollywood motion picture.

WHAT DO WE EAT?

Delicious dairy products. Cheesecakes are big. If your ancestors hail from the Tri-State area—Poland, Russia, Ukraine—so are blintzes.

WHY?

The rational explanation is that the Torah was given on the Sabbath, and as no animals could be slaughtered to celebrate the happy occasion, the Israelites likely shrugged their shoulders and collectively agreed to nosh on some brie. More mystical Jews—you know, Madonna—believe that the numbers speak for themselves: Dairy in Hebrew is chalav, and if you sum up the numerical value of the three Hebrew letters that make up that word you get 40. Which is a number you’d remember if you had to wander in the desert for as many years.

ANY DOS AND DON’TS?

First up, be happy. Why? It says so in Deuteronomy: “And you shall rejoice in your festival … and you shall only be happy.” Done rejoicing? Get ready for Yom Tov, which is a kind of Holiday Lite: You’re not allowed to work, use electrical appliances, handle money, or do any of the other stuff you can’t do on the Sabbath, but you are allowed to cook and bake, provided you use a pre-existing flame for lighting your fire and avoid that Kitchenaid. You can also carry stuff in public, another Sabbath no-no.

But Yom Tov’s less about the nays and more about the yays. Because we have to be happy, we’re obligated to prepare obscene amounts of food and invite the less fortunate to partake. Men are also expected to buy new clothes or jewelry for their wives, candy or toys for the wee ones, and flowers for the home, as Shavuot, celebrated in the spring, is also known as the Festival of Harvest.

ANYTHING GOOD TO READ?

You bet. Traditionally, we read the Book of Ruth on Shavuot. It’s like the Desperate Housewives of Canaan—Dead husbands! Levirate marriages! Sexy harvest scenes!—whose heroine is a Moabite who converts to Judaism and becomes the great-great-grandmother of King David (symbolism alert: Just as the Israelites accept the Torah and become Jews, Ruth embraces the Torah and becomes a Jew herself). King David, by the way, is said to have been born and died on Shavuot, which makes the book apropos, as do said harvest scenes.

And then, of course, there’s the matter of all-night learning. We weren’t kidding about that: It’s called a tikkun, Hebrew for correction, and tradition has it that since the Jews didn’t rise early enough to receive the Torah in Sinai—some accounts have God himself nudging them from their sleep, in what must have been the most terrifying wake-up call ever—they have resolved to stay up all night and study the Torah, commemorate the day it was given, and make up for the drowsiness of their ancestors. While religious Jews still adhere to Torah study, many less observant ones choose to spend the night studying anything from Jewish history, poetry, and art to contemporary Israeli television shows.

Reprinted from Tablet Magazine.

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Glazed Lemon Ricotta Cookies

kosher dairy recipes, kosher dessert recipes

Glazed Lemon Ricotta Cookies

No Comments 11 May 2010

If  I hadn’t seen Giada make these delicious cookies on The Food Network, I would have never made this recipe. I thought it just sounded strange- a ricotta lemon cookie? But after I saw her make them I knew this recipe was a winner. So I got out my Kitchen Aid and started baking. And the cookies were fantastic. The ricotta cheese gave the cookie a fluffy inner texture, and the glaze with the lemon zest in it really looked very pretty.

Ingredients

Cookies:

  • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 stick unsalted butter, softened
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 (15-ounce) container whole milk ricotta cheese
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 lemon, zested

Glaze:

  • 1 1/2 cups powdered sugar
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 lemon, zested

Directions

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.

Cookies:

In a medium bowl combine the flour, baking powder, and salt. Set aside.

In the large bowl combine the butter and the sugar. Using an electric mixer beat the butter and sugar until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add the eggs, 1 at a time, beating until incorporated. Add the ricotta cheese, lemon juice, and lemon zest. Beat to combine. Stir in the dry ingredients.

Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. Spoon the dough (about 2 tablespoons for each cookie) onto the baking sheets. Bake for 15 minutes, until slightly golden at the edges. Remove from the oven and let the cookies rest on the baking sheet for 20 minutes.

Glaze:

Combine the powdered sugar, lemon juice, and lemon zest in a small bowl and stir until smooth. Spoon about 1/2-teaspoon onto each cookie and use the back of the spoon to gently spread. Let the glaze harden for about 2 hours. When cookies are cool they can be frozen, but make sure glaze is fully hardened.     

No Cheese Quiche with Leek and Onions

kosher pareve recipes, kosher recipes, kosher vegetable recipes

No Cheese Quiche with Leek and Onions

2 Comments 11 May 2010

The vidalia onions in this recipe gives the dish a slightly sweet taste. The missing cheese makes this recipe low fat, but no one will even miss the cheese- so don’t even tell them!

Ingredients:

Two Bunches Leek (About Six-Eight Stalks), light green and whites only, cleaned thoroughly and roughly chopped

Two Vidalia Onions, chopped

Six to Eight  large eggs ( I use about 3-4 yellows and the rest whites)

Salt to Taste

Large Pyrex Dish sprayed with Pam

In a large pot, saute onions and leeks in very little oil on a high flame.  Saute mixture until it begins to wilt and leeks soften (about 5-6 minutes).  Do not brown. If there is excess water in the pot drain it.

Season leek and onion mixture with salt. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary before mixing in the eggs.

Mix eggs with leek and onions and pour in greased pyrex dish.

Bake on 350 until mixture is solid.

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Use What You Have Table Setting…

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Use What You Have Table Setting…

No Comments 10 May 2010

I created this table setting with things I had laying around the house…

It’s my idea of a  perfect breakfast/brunch for two. I think it would be absolutely GORGEOUS as a Shavuot table setting set for a family as well.

Many people own white dishes, and this table setting makes a case for them. Why? You can combine them with other sets, bright napkins look fabulous with them and they can never go out of style.  (Mine were actually my mother’s! They are over 25 years old but they still sell them in department stores today! How is that for timeless!)

I added in these bowls that I recently bought from Anthropology($12), colorful napkins that I bought a few years ago and brightly colored glasses that were a wedding gift. Here are some similar ones.

I used a white linen hemstitch placemat, which is perfect for a breakfast or a lunch. You can buy some HERE ($54.00/Set of 6).

It also helps that I have an absolutely beautiful centerpiece that I took from my nephew’s bar mitzvah yesterday!

The point is… You can mix and match the pieces that you already own to create beautiful tablescapes that are both charming and interesting!

How do you change it up for the holidays? Do you mix and match your sets of dishes? Send us photos, we would love to publish them!

Happy Shavuot!

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Organic Quinoa Salad with Fresh Mint

kosher pareve recipes, kosher recipes, kosher salad recipes, kosher vegetable recipes

Organic Quinoa Salad with Fresh Mint

2 Comments 10 May 2010

I am not even sure where my mother got this recipe from (when I find out I will credit you- whoever you are). Anyways, I know that every day, magazines and blogs are posting another quinoa recipe and it is beginning to get tired. But, this recipe really has a unique flavor from the fresh mint, so I suggest you give it a go!

2 cups Organic Quinoa uncooked

2 Israeli cucumbers, chopped

1 small bunch fresh mint leaves, cleaned and chopped

2 Tablespoons Safflower Oil

Juice of 2 freshly squeezed lemons

Salt to taste

1/2 tsp cumin

Cook quinoa according to package directions and let cool.

Add chopped cucumbers and chopped mint.

To make dressing, mix oil, lemon juice, salt and cumin. Taste, and adjust seasoning if necessary.

Pour over quinoa salad and mix

Candle Stick Round Up- A Perfect Gift- For Yourself!

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Candle Stick Round Up- A Perfect Gift- For Yourself!

No Comments 09 May 2010

Who says Shabbat Candlesticks have to be traditional? I did a round up of the most eclectic candlesticks I could find… These are perfect for a Mom that steps outside the box once in a while! They vary in price and in style, so we could find something for everyone. From rustic to modern to elegant we have got you covered!

Are you lucky enough to be invited out to eat on Shavuot? Your Jewish Hostess will love any of these candlesticks as a gift!

Are you exhausted from Mother’s day?

Working hard in the kitchen lately?  Treat Yourself!

1. Agate Candleholders- 125

2.Analiese Taper Holder 24

3. Jonathan Adler lantern candlestick $48

4. Iron Branch Candle holder $250

5. Michael Wainwright Large Turo Candlestick $130

6. Lumi Candleholders $2.95 – $4.95

7.Fashion Forward Taper $18

8. Horn Candlesticks

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White Decor for Shavuot!

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White Decor for Shavuot!

No Comments 09 May 2010

Shavuot marks the unofficial start of Summer to me… and nothing makes me happier than crisp summer whites. Linen, wicker, driftwood,  shells, porcelain… These are a few of my favorite Summer Whites to brighten up your home!

1. Willow Cabana Chair $550

2. Hex Stool $250

3. George Pendant Light $185

4. Gray French Chair $1695

5. Eloise White Wire Lamp $450

6. Antique English Server $6800

7. Natural Patterned Pillow $260

8. X Based Driftwood Console $3295

9. White Rattan Chair $1450

10. White Tramp Art Frame $58

11.Peasant Bolster $54

12. Porcelain Books $32

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Whole Wheat  Zaatar Bread for Shavuot

kosher bread recipes, kosher pareve recipes

Whole Wheat Zaatar Bread for Shavuot

No Comments 09 May 2010

Zaatar Bread

It was 1980, and I remember visiting my Grandma Molly Sutton in her two-family home on Ocean Parkway in Brooklyn. Gathering all of her strenth, she proceeded to pull out a familiar piece of pita bread (or Syrian bread as we call it), and slice it legnthwise  into two large rounds.

She then carefully mixed some olive oil  into the home-made zaatar, spooned the mixture onto the pita circles, and slid the two rounds into her toaster oven.

This was a typical mid-day meal of hers.

She began to tell me how, as a 15 year old girl, she arrived in this country with her older sister Selma on a freighter vessel from Syria.

They did not have much food , but the one thing that they were able to find, was the comforting “Zet ou Zaatar” sold in the Arab quarters on the lower East Side. The zaatar spice was dark in color, so passer- bys who could not comprehend this middle eastern spice, called it  ”dirty bread”. Nevertheless, it brought them back to memories of home.

Now, 30 years later, memories of my grandmother toasting her zet ou zaatar come to mind as I attempt to gather ingredients for my own whole wheat version of zaatar bread this Shavuot, 2010.

Even if you are lucky enough to live near a middle Eastern supermarket and can buy this delicacy

any weekday morning, there is nothing like the taste or aroma of your own home baked bread .

Perfect with a slice of cheese and tomato, or dipped into greek yogurt or lebne.

Recipe adapted from HERE.

How To Make Pita Bread- The Video

Ingredients:

  • 2 1/2 cups warm water (110 degrees)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon active dry yeast
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 2 cups whole wheat wheat flour
  • 3 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon vegetable oil

Preparation:

Dissolve yeast in warm water. Add honey and stir until dissolved. Let sit for 10-15 minutes until water is frothy.

Combine white flour, wheat flour, and salt in large bowl.

Make a small depression in the middle of flour and pour yeast water in depression.

Slowly add warm yeast water, and stir with wooden spoon or rubber spatula until dough becomes elastic.

Place dough on floured surface and knead for 10-15 minutes. When the dough is no longer sticky and is smooth and elastic, it has been successfully kneaded.

Coat large bowl with vegetable oil and place dough in bowl. Turn dough upside down so all of the dough is coated with oil. Allow to sit, covered, in a warm place for about 3 hours, or until it has doubled in size.

Once doubled, roll out in a rope, and pinch off 10-12 small pieces. Place balls on floured surface. Let sit covered for 10 minutes. Preheat oven to 500 deg F. and make sure rack is at the very bottom of oven. Be sure to preheat your baking sheet also.

Roll out each ball of dough with a rolling pin into circles. Each should be about 5-6 inches across and 1/4 inch thick.

Lightly brush the rounds with some olive oil and sorinkle generously with the zaatar spice.

Bake each circle for 4 minutes until the bread puffs up. Turn over and bake for 2 minutes.

Remove each pita with a spatula from the baking sheet and add additional pitas for baking.

Take spatula and gently push down puff. Immediately place in storage bags.

Storing Pita Bread:

Pita bread can be stored for up to a week in a pantry or bread box, and up to a month in the freezer. Be sure to use freezer bags when storing in the freezer.

Pita bread dough can also be refrigerated for up to one week in the refrigerator.

Buy Kosher Zaatar Here:

Or You Can Make it from scratch:

Two Zaatar spice mix recipes to choose from:

Combine salt,thyme , marjoram, oregano leaves, sumac and sesame seeds in a medium mixing bowl. Sumac is a dark red berry that grows on bushes throughout the Middle East and some parts of Italy. Sumac is sold ground or in dried seed form and can be found at most Middle Eastern markets, or can be ordered from an online specialty company. Store in a dry container until use.

When ready to serve, add the olive oil to the mixture to form a paste. This paste is the zaatar mixture.

1-

  • 1/4 cup sumac
  • 2 tablespoons thyme
  • 1 tablespoon roasted sesame seeds
  • 2 tablespoons marjoram
  • 2 tablespoons oregano
  • 1 teaspoon coarse salt

or:

2-

  • 3 parts toasted sesame seeds
  • - some recipes call for one part  toasted sesame seeds. -it really depends on your tastebuds!
  • 2 parts dried thyme
  • 2 part dried marjoram
  • 2 part oregano
  • 1/2 – 1 part powdered sumac salt, optional
  • coarse salt to taste

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Enjoy A Dry Red Wine on Shabbat

kosher drink recipes

Enjoy A Dry Red Wine on Shabbat

1 Comment 09 May 2010

Yatir Cabernet Sauvignon 2006 – Yatir Winery is producing some of the finest wines coming out of Israel.   The Yatir Cabernet Sauvignon is a medium body, dry, red wine made from grapes grown in the lower Judean Hills on the border of the Negev Desert Region.  It is 85% Cabernet Sauvignon and 15% Petit Verdot, with its trademarked deep purple color.  Expect an action packed, flavor attack on the mouth initially, with layers and layers of black fruit flavors, and a long sensuous finish.  It should go great with any full flavored red meat dish.

Dry red wines should be served cool to the touch, but not chilled.  It is a fine new world  style Cabernet Sauvignon, which can be enjoyed by everyone, at the Shabbos table.

Goes perfectly with Rosemary and Garlic Baby Lambchops or Kosher Contessa Rack of Lamb Persillade

$$$$$

Mark Glicksman is certified by the International Wine Center in New York City, and frequently writes wine reviews for publications.

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Keeping Recipes in the Family

kosher recipes

Keeping Recipes in the Family

4 Comments 08 May 2010

As I watch my daughters grow and get married and have homes of their own,I would like to be sure that I can pass to them the wonderful and valuable recipes and tips that I received from the generations before me.
Personally,it has been a challenge to try and get a complete list of ingredients or the proper measurements from my grandmother who makes every dish to perfection,and when asked, just answers “put a glass of this or a pinch of that”. I attempt to follow but it never does come out correctly.

A few years ago,I took it upon myself to spend countless hours with my grandmother observing writing and measuring her handfuls dashes and pours.each recipe was lovingly explained and every simmering pot carefully tended to.This is when I realized that,as we all sat around her table enjoying her labours, she was smiling.This is her gift.I took those pages,each entry a gem,threw in some sentimental anecdotes,and went to Staples.I had them copied and bound into a book and now every women in the family owns one.we have even had many non relatives request one.

Hopefully,in years to come, these recipes will make their way onto the table of my great great grandchildren and it will taste the same as it did today.
The first step is getting a notebook,asking opinions and interviewing to find out family favorites.from there you will see the project will take on a life of its own. It can be done simply,handwritten or typed,children can contribute with their artwork, or much more elaborate books can be made.
With all the technology today it is possible to have your family cookbook published for a small expense.The companies offer a free packet to get you started and they make it so simple and the product is so beautiful.
Some suggestions:

tastebook.com – My favorite site for creating a cookbook. Combine your own family recipes with famous top rated  online recipes. Create  gorgeous books easily.

www.morrispublishing.com

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Begin your first steps on a delicious jouney!

Lily Tawil

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Kids Flower Crafts for the Shabbat table

at home, kids

Kids Flower Crafts for the Shabbat table

1 Comment 08 May 2010

by Creative Jewish Mom in Israel.

Cupcake liner flowers are one of those crafts that just make you smile! What’s not to love? A few days ago I showed you some romantic carnation-like versions here. So now I thought I’d share this little colorful bouquet, made the same way just with the addition of some blue-striped liners and some bright paint.

Its easy for kids and moms too!

I’m originally from California, where Mexican heritage has quite a presence, so though I’m preparing for the upcoming Jewish holiday of Shavuos, I just couldn’t help but think how great these would be for Cinco de Mayo! And I even pulled out my authentic Mexican blanket for the photo! And by the way, large vintage sugar and flour shakers (or even salt and pepper, but they’re usually much smaller) make great little vases, just stick the stems into the holes and voila!

For a complete cupcake liner flower tutorial, visit my previous post here. Enjoy!

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