Chicken Scallopini with Wild Mushrooms

kosher chicken recipes, kosher recipes, rosh hashanah chicken recipes

Chicken Scallopini with Wild Mushrooms

1 Comment 22 February 2011

Thank you Paula Shoyer for this  new kosher chicken scallopini recipe!   Its a cinch to make, its perfect for company, and can be kept warm until serving. This Kosher Chicken Recipe Serves 6

 

  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 8 boneless kosher chicken breasts sliced or pounded thin, or scallopini slices
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt
  • ½ teaspoon ground pepper
  • 8 shitake mushrooms, cleaned and sliced
  • 8 button mushrooms, cleaned and sliced
  • ½ cup white wine
  • ½ teaspoon dried thyme leaves
  • 1 cup kosher chicken broth
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons finely chopped parsley
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 250ºF. Heat the oil in a wide frying or saucepan on medium-high heat.  Place the flour, salt and pepper into a large plastic bag and shake.  Add the kosher chicken breasts three at a time, close the bag and shake to coat.  Shake off the excess flour.  Add the kosher chicken breasts to the pan and cook 2-3 minutes each side until you see some browned parts.  Place into a 9 X 13 oven-proof pan.  Cook the rest of the breasts and then place the pan into the oven to keep warm. Add the mushrooms to the pan and cook for two minutes, stirring often.  Add the wine and thyme and cook for two minutes, until the wine starts to cook down a little and thicken.  Add the stock and lemon juice and cook another two to three minutes until the sauce thickens a little. Remove the kosher chicken from the oven and add into the sauce, turning to coat both sides.  Add salt and pepper to taste and sprinkle with the chopped parsley.  Place into the oven until serving. About the creator of this Kosher Chicken recipe… Paula Shoyer is one of the leading kosher chefs in the Jewish foodie world. She now teaching classes in French pastry and Jewish cooking and baking to adults and kids, both in the Washington, D.C. area and all around the United States. Buy her new book The Kosher Baker: Over 160 Dairy-free Recipes from Traditional to Trendy (HBI Series on Jewish Women) on Amazon.

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Healthy Vegan Broccoli Loaf

kosher pareve recipes, kosher recipes, kosher vegetable recipes

Healthy Vegan Broccoli Loaf

3 Comments 21 February 2011

The following recipes are from The Vegetarian Shabbat Cookbook

Micah Publications is the Source for Jewish Animal Rights and Vegetarian Books

~BROCCOLI  LOAF~

Broccoli is so healthy, that any way you eat it is good.   Prepare this loaf for a winter

Shabbat and bake potatoes and squash with it,  but make enough for the next day because

broccoli loaf at room temperature might be just the thing for a Shabbat afternoon lunch.

And serve it with the curried roasted potato salad, followed with spice cake.

Heat oven  375º

  • 3 cups of broccoli florets, steamed and pureed in food processor
  • 1/2 cup wheat germ
  • 1/4 cup nutritional yeast
  • 1/2 cup chopped onions or scallion
  • 1/4 cup parsley
  • 1/2 cup vegan cheddar cheese
  • pinch of salt
  • 1 Tablespoon of seasoning
  • sprinkle top with paprika
  • Optional:  pinch of nutmeg on top.

Oil  small loaf pan.  Mix all ingredients together.  Bake 40 minutes or until top browns, and there you are.  Could anything be easier?

Serves 4-5

Note: Nutritional yeast is light and flaky, rich in Vitamin B12, and adds a cheese flavor—

can be used in place of Parmesan cheese.

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Organic Wild Salmon with Pecans and Pineapple Reduction

kosher fish recipes, kosher pareve recipes, kosher recipes

Organic Wild Salmon with Pecans and Pineapple Reduction

2 Comments 20 February 2011

by Charlie Michelle

I want to preface this great kosher recipe with a little piece of trivia about myself. I really dislike fish. I dislike fish so much that the mere smell of my son’s school on fish-stick days makes me a little green. So when I say that this salmon recipe is amazing, well, that’s saying a lot. A whole lot.

I first tried this kosher recipe at a 5-star restaurant on my wedding anniversary so many years ago. I have no idea what possessed me to order such a dish, given my aforementioned aversion to fish, but I suppose the lure of such an interesting flavor combination–pecans, pineapple, cinnamon, and…fish!…arose my interest. So I tried it. And I loved it. And I set out to replicate it.

My dairy-free kosher recipe is a culmination of lots of trial and error. Tweaking a spice here, altering a crust ingredient there…. but I finally feel I have managed to reproduce the richly flavorful dish I discovered so long ago. And so, dear fellow Jewish Hostesses, I pass it along to you. Why should the restaurant get all the glory?

What you’ll need for two servings:

– Two filets salmon (I use organic, to ensure no artificial coloring has been added)
– 1 cup chopped pecans
– 2 tablespoons vegetable margarine or Earth Balance margarine, softened
– 2 tablespoons brown sugar
– 1 tablespoon flour
– 2 teaspoons cinnamon
– 1 teaspoon nutmeg* (see note)
– 1 teaspoon chili powder
– 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

Pineapple sauce:

– 1/2 cup crushed pineapple and juice, pureed in a blender or food processor until smooth
– 2 teaspoons chili powder
– 1/2 cup soy yogurt – vanilla, coconut, pineapple, or pina colada flavors work well

Here’s how you make it:

1) Preheat your oven to 350 degrees F and line a baking sheet with aluminum foil. Place salmon filets skin-side down on your baking sheet.

2) In a small food processor, grind your pecans. You can make them as smooth or as chunky as you like. When they are ground to your liking, transfer them to a small bowl and add your margarine, brown sugar, flour, and spices. Using your fingers (I like to get in there and get dirty!) smush your margarine into the pecans as if you were making a crumb pie crust.

3) When everything is well blended, scoop a small handful of your pecan mixture and press it evenly onto each salmon filet. Be generous. That pecan topping is good stuff.

4) Bake salmon at 350 degrees F until it flakes easily with a fork, or its flesh has turned light pink, about 15-20 minutes. When salmon has finished baking, move your oven rack to the second-highest level and broil briefly (2-3 minutes) to make the pecan crust nice and crispy. Because of the sugar content, watch it closely or it will scorch.

To make your sauce:

In a small saucepan, combine pineapple puree and chili powder. Stir well. Cover and bring to a simmer. I like to call it an “aggravated simmer”. Not quite a full boil, but not just a lazy little simmer either. We don’t want to reduce the pineapple, we just want to break it down and bring out the flavor.
After a good 5-6 minutes of “aggravated simmer” (patent pending on that term, hehe!) turn off the heat and add your soy yogurt. Whisk together to blend well.

Serve your pineapple sauce drizzled prettily over the salmon filet, and garnish with something pretty–carrot curls, a parsley or mint leaf, lemon rosebuds, whatever you like. I served mine with a fresh, springy vegetable salad with lime vinaigrette. You can see the kosher recipe for this lovely side dish here.

Enjoy, and happy eating!

*As for the nutmeg, yes, you can totally make it optional.As stated in the kosher recipe, it’s been a work of trial and error, playing with all kinds of in gredient combos to see what works. If you exclude the nutmeg, though, I would definitely replace it with something equally as spicy–maybe ground cloves or an extra pinch of chili powder.

About me:

Charlie’s my name–not short for Charlotte or anything. :) I currently write and maintain a daily food blog, focusing mostly on vegetarian and kosher recipe, ranging from appetizers and side dishes, to dinner and casseroles, to luxurious desserts. My husband serves with the Army, and he recently traveled 1200 miles home for a family emergency. I wanted him to be greeted home with a little bit of luxury, but also with a dish that has a comfort-food appeal to it. Nuts and spices always sing of cooler weather and warm kitchens, while the fresh pineapple sauce lends a happy springtime feel. I thought the combination would be perfect to excite his senses and give him yet another reason to be happy to be home. Enjoy my recipe!

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Amy Atlas’s Secret Tips to Designing Your Own Dessert Bar

kosher dessert recipes, parties

Amy Atlas’s Secret Tips to Designing Your Own Dessert Bar

3 Comments 18 February 2011

Check out these gorgeous kosher dessert bars designed by the  famous NYC entertaining diva Amy Atlas.

Thank you Amy  for sharing your sweet kosher dessert design tips with Jewish Hostesses all over the globe!

A note to all our readers- Amy designs kosher dessert bars for all occasions including brit milahs, bar and bat mitzvahs, bridal showers, weddings, and any other happy occasion that you can dream up!

Amy’s tips for designing your own Kosher Dessert bar:

 

  • Take something that inspires you and create your dessert table around it. The design can be inspired from something as personal as a family heirloom to as simple as the pattern on the host’s invitation. Let the dessert table tell a story about the event so that the dessert not only becomes functional, but becomes part of the event design.

  • Create a beautiful backdrop for your dessert table. Décor elements complete the look of a dessert table and a fabulous backdrop is the perfect way to incorporate artistry to the table.

  • Pick beautiful linens and unique vessels to dress up your kosher dessert table. Since your sweets will be the star of your dessert table, the linens and vessels should have a coordinated, tailored look.

  • Always sample your dessert vendors before using them for your event. A beautiful cake is not always the best tasting cake! The key is to find the right balance. Pick kosher desserts that not only look good together, but provide a balance for your guests’ palate.

  • Incorporate some type of signage to dress up the dessert table. This will show your guests how personal your kosher dessert table is. You can have your stationer create personalized tags for you.
  • Provide goody bags for your guests as take-home desserts. It is always a treat to give your guests something to take home to remind them of how sweet the day was.

Amy’s favorite shops/online destinations for supplies:

“I love Michaels, Kate’s Paperie, and Lee’s Art Shop for supplies,

Crate and Barrel (www.crateandbarrel.com) is great for platters and vases.”

One of Amy’s favorite Kosher Dessert Recipes (something easy/fun to make): –

Chocolate chip peanut butter cookies or bars – I’m a huge chocolate peanut butter lover!

    • 2 1/2 cups graham cracker crumbs
    • 1 cup peanut butter
    • 1 cup butter, melted
    • 2 cups semisweet chocolate chips
    • 2 3/4 cups confectioners’ sugar

In a medium bowl, stir together graham cracker crumbs, confectioners’ sugar, peanut butter and melted butter. Press firmly into the bottom of a 9×13 inch pan. Melt chocolate chips over a double boiler or in the microwave, stirring occasionally. Spread melted chocolate over the crumb crust. Chill for about 5 minutes, then cut into bars before the chocolate is completely set, then chill until ready to serve.

Amy Atlas is a coveted entertaining expert, baking and crafting stylist, and is internationally recognized for creating the stylized dessert bar trend.  Amy’s work has appeared multiple times in InStyle Magazine, Parents Magazine, Better Homes & Gardens, The New York Times, Every Day with Rachael Ray, The Los Angeles Times, Food and Wine Magazine, Life & Style, Gotham, New York Magazine, Martha Stewart Weddings, Brides, and many more.  Her work has appeared on thousands of top US and international entertaining and lifestyle blogs.

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Mediterranean Lamb With Warm Plums and Pears Cooked in Wine

kosher main dish recipes, kosher meat recipes, kosher passover recipes,seder table Ideas, kosher recipes, kosher thanksgiving recipes, rosh hashanah roast , lamb, and brisket recipes

Mediterranean Lamb With Warm Plums and Pears Cooked in Wine

2 Comments 17 February 2011

Its almost time to get out those Passover pots and pans! This Passover recipe was sent in by wonder-woman Sarah Lasry, founder of the brand new website for the modern Jewish woman, Kosherstreet.com. She has also written a brand new gourmet kosher cookbook The At Home Gourmet. Click Here to check it out! Marlene M.

“I am always looking for easy Lamb recipes to make for the holidays. This recipe was something I adapted from a Mediteranian chicken recipe that my friend Rivky E. would make often for Rosh Hashanah or  a regular Shabbat dinner. A few years ago, for one of the Seder meals, I decided to try it with lamb instead. It was really such a huge hit, that now it is a tradition at our Passover Seder table. Enjoy! Sarah”

Mediterranean Lamb  Cooked with Warm Plums and Pears

  • 1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 4-5 lamb steaks
  • Kosher salt and pepper
  • ¼ cup honey
  • 2 tsp. fresh mint, chopped fine
  • 2 cups good red wine (choose one that you love to drink)
  • 2 Asian pears, peeled, cored and sliced thin
  • 1 cup whole dried prunes

Heat up the oil in a Dutch oven or a small stock pot on medium-high flame. Pat the lamb dry, sprinkle with salt and pepper and then using a pastry brush coat the lamb with the honey. Sprinkle the chopped mint on both sides of the lamb and lay each piece gently into the hot oil. Let the lamb cook and brown, 1 minute on each side and then remove with tongs and set aside.

Lower flame and add the red wine to the hot pot. Use the flat end of a wooden spoon and scrape up the brown bits on the bottom of the pot and mix with the red wine. Then add the sliced pears and whole prunes and cover the pot. Let the pears and prunes cook in the red wine for about 3-4 minutes. Uncover pot and add the lamb back into the pot. Cook for an additional 20-25 minutes. The red wine should have reduced significantly. Remove lamb onto platter, let stand for at least 8 minutes before serving. Spoon the warm plums and pears with wine on top of the lamb and serve.

www.Kosherstreet.com the #1 source on the web for the kosher family.  Expert  kosher food recipe bloggers, home & fashion consultants, travel tips advisors, family therapist, and kid gurus come together to share their know-how and talents with you! So if you need healthy delicious kosher recipes for dinner, yom tov or home design décor tips, cheap & fun family vacation ideas, restaurant reviews,  fun kids crafts, or a little family talk, kosherstreet.com and our expert team is blogging away daily. Living a Kosher lifestyle  was never this easy!

 

 

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Aleph Bet Train Party

birthday parties, Dessert Buffet Bars, parties

Aleph Bet Train Party

11 Comments 10 February 2011

by Amy Oren of Blowout Party

My son just turned three years old and we cut his hair for the first time! To celebrate his birthday and upsherin we threw him a birthday party featuring some of his favorite things: trains, the Aleph Bet, and the color green! He was so excited to see all the décor! I wanted the kosher dessert table to be very bright and have a storybook feel, so I set it up in three tiers and had a train full of candy going up a hill. The train was made of cardboard boxes covered in scrapbook paper that I got from Amazing Savings! The cute Aleph Bet characters waved from the train car windows.

At the kids table, each child got a bandanna (which served as a placemat), a train whistle, a conductor’s hat, and a suitcase lunchbox personalized with plastic suitcase tags. On the table were adorable hard cover train shaped books- each family received one (also from Amazing Savings).

Besides for the food set up at the buffet table, the kids got some yummy and fun food in their suitcase lunchboxes: sandwiches in the shape of a train (cut with a cookie cutter), cheese, tomatoes, and olives on Aleph Bet picks that I made, and an apple juice box drink wrapped with a personalized wrapper.

I made some fondant covered Aleph- Bet decorated cookies that I scattered around the train cars. The faces were drawn with edible markers. I made a fondant covered train cake with bunting that said happy birthday.

For fun candy trees, I skewered sour belts onto toothpicks and stuck them into Styrofoam balls. I added the flower lollipops for you know, a little more sugar ;)

The kids loaded their suitcases with candy!  They also painted wooden trains that we glued onto their lunchbox suitcases, and they decorated the boxes with foam letters and shapes.

I’ll soon be posting on my blog free printables that you can download and print for yourself, like the juice box wrappers, the luggage tags, the book nametags…

Hope you enjoyed these pictures and that you’re inspired for your own children’s birthday parties!

check out my store Blowout Party!

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How to Make the Best Dressed Salad in the City

kosher recipes, kosher salad recipes, rosh hashanah pasta, salads, and lunch ideas

How to Make the Best Dressed Salad in the City

No Comments 09 February 2011

You’ve never made a salad until you’ve taken some tips from Chef Adam Mimram.

Slicing veggies is an art, and the secret to whisking your dressing lies here!
My kids got to eat this gourmet kosher salad, and even the picky eaters demolished it!!!
Press play now!
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How to Make Chocolate Dipped Pretzels For Purim

kosher dessert recipes, kosher recipes, parties, purim recipes, baskets, and decor

How to Make Chocolate Dipped Pretzels For Purim

8 Comments 06 February 2011


Believe it or not Purim is March 20 this year- the clock is ticking!!!

Please send in your inspirations and ideas to share with other Jewish Hostesses!

These pretzels by Shirley are a gorgeous add-in for Mishloach Manot. Just place them in food cello  bags from HERE or  HERE and tie them with fringe cord ribbons from HERE. Of course as a second item to include in a gift basket you can simply add a bottle of grape juice or if you want to shmancy it up use a nice bottle of wine.

Shirley actually made these pretzels for an engagement party and when I saw how everyone was grabbing them to take home as a goodie for their kids -(ahem) I knew that I had to get the recipe for my Jewish Hostess readers.


I found these personalized ribbons from HERE to decorate Purim baskets.  Just order the ribbons with “Happy Purim! Love the Cohens…” written on them. It takes 2 weeks to order, so do it soon!

Pretzel photos by Morris Gindi Photography.

Happy Purim!

Marlene M.

“Hi its Shirley from Homebaked…I’d like to share with you one of my most well received recipes, which also happens to be one of the easiest to prepare. People (old and young alike) just go crazy for the salty/crunchy/chocolaty goodness of a chocolate covered pretzel.  These little treats are the perfect way to end a meal, and the flavor combinations and toppings for the pretzels are quite limitless. Here I have posted a few of my personal favorite ideas for decorating, however, feel free to get creative…you certainly can’tt go wrong.

What You’ll Need:

  • Pretzel Rods (If the rods are big, I like to cut them in half with an knife to make a smaller pretzel. )
  • Semisweet, Milk, or white Chocolate for dipping and drizzling
  • Sprinkles such as chopped oreos, chopped nuts, mini m&ms, toffee bits, nonpareils, peanut butter chips…

To Assemble:

  1. Line a cookie sheet with wax paper.
  2. Melt the chocolate that you will be using to dip the pretzels in the microwave, in 10-second intervals (as to not burn the chocolate).
  3. Transfer the melted chocolate into a deep bowl or cup, and proceed to dip the pretzels into the chocolate, leaving just the tip of the pretzel bare. Shake of any excess chocolate back into the bowl. (If the chocolate seems to be too thick for dipping, simply use a knife to spread it evenly around the pretzel. Don’t worry about imperfections- they’ll be covered up by the sprinkles.)
  4. Immediately roll or sprinkle the pretzel with the desired topping while the chocolate is still melted, and place onto the cookie sheet.
  5. When all of the pretzels have been dipped and decorated, melt some chocolate (of a different shade) in the microwave.
  6. Transfer the melted chocolate into a sturdy ziplock bag and squeeze down until all the chocolate is in one corner of the bag.
  7. With sharp scissors, snip a tiny hole into the corner of the bag, begin to drizzle the chocolate-covered, decorated pretzels that are on the cookie sheet.
  8. Freeze the pretzels for up to a month in an airtight container.
  9. Enjoy!!


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Healthy Eating Tips for Passover 2011

healthy body, healthy living, healthy mind, kosher passover recipes,seder table Ideas

Healthy Eating Tips for Passover 2011

2 Comments 06 February 2011

 

Pray. Drink. Eat: The Reality of Passover

Eat. Pray. Love. A famous book and movie. Pray. Drink. Eat. A typical Passover seder. The holiday season brings with it bigger, later meals, junk food, socialized eating and less physical activity. Rest assured, there are ways to not let the food restrictions defined by Passover define poor food choices. Understanding the reality will help you calmly take control of what and how you are eating. Recalling the splitting of the red sea does not have to result in the splitting of your pants. Here are realistic and easy to follow weight management tips for this Passover season:

Choose whole grains.  Whole grains are the optimal choice for health compared to refined carbohydrates for benefits including more fiber and vitamins. They are the key to making you feel fuller and satisfied longer and relieve feelings of bloating and constipation that typically accompany Passover eating habits. Lucky for us, there are a variety of products on the market today to make this step easier. No more excuses. From farfel to matzo meal, regular matzo to shemura you finally have more choices.

Eat Breakfast. This step is essential to curb your appetite throughout the day and achieve a healthy weight. Get creative with your choice of breakfast options so you are not eating 5 pieces of matzo with cream cheese every Passover morning. Choose plain yogurt (there are many varieties kosher for Passover) and mix with your own fresh fruit. Add a few small pieces of whole wheat matzo for added crunch. Another great choice can come right off leftovers of your Seder table: the hardboiled egg. You can also make an omelet and add vegetables to make it more nutritious. Even a salad with an egg or tuna fish and a piece of whole wheat matzo is a well-rounded, balanced breakfast.

Eat Regularly. Sounds simple, right? You wake up and tell yourself you are going to start with breakfast and not go more than three hours without eating a small portion of something. Well, with the kids at home, cleaning, cooking the meals, socializing with family and forget about the demands of Seder nights where you feel forced to adhere to the meal schedule dependant on the synagogue one, remembering to eat is not on the top of your mind. The seemingly easy step, if not kept, can be your biggest downfall. Your body is a living, breathing being. It runs on a timer, one that was set based on your eating patterns. If you skip meals and snacks your body will be out of sync, not knowing when you will give it the nutrients it needs to function next. In turn, the body will respond by hanging on to every last bite you eat. This in turn will slow your metabolism and contribute to bloating and future weight gain. It will take reregulating your eating pattern and being consistent to get your body back into motion, a process that takes a lot longer than you simply remembering to eat in the first place! Keep in mind that there is no way to avoid eating the late night feast during Seders, but ensuring you are eating small, frequent meals or snacks throughout the day will help you to not overeat. Try to skip the night dessert and plan it for lunch instead, which leads to the next tip…

Go Dark. Let’s face it: dessert is part of the Passover experience. You need to be geared up to make the best choices. If you must have the piece of chocolate, always go dark versus milk. Dark chocolate has flavonoids, an antioxidant, with less sugar and calories. If you need to satisfy that sweet tooth and the fresh fruit is not cutting it, best choice is the simple square piece of a dark chocolate bar, a small dark chocolate covered lollipop or a handful of dark chocolate covered nuts. Stay away from chocolate combined with other added sugars like caramel.

More importantly than the choice of snack, is planning when you want to have it. Studies show you eat less when snacks are planned versus an impromptu urge where you may overindulge. If you choose to have your dessert at lunchtime, for example, it is better to have that piece of cake in your mind than to eat multiple portions of every dessert at each meal without thinking twice.

Planning the unplanned meals. Eating more per meal than usual can do harm. Your body sorts through the rapid influx of food you consumed in a short amount of time resulting in a digestion and metabolism slow down. When venturing to meals as a guest, use your plate as ammunition against the unknown battlefield of food. Take a 9-inch plate and divide into quarters: one quarter for a protein, one for a starch and two for vegetables (potatoes, peas, beans and corn count as a starch). With this strategy you are assured to eat a balanced, portion controlled meal no matter what the exact dishes turn out to be.

Remember to eat slowly. Taking your time while eating will allow the food to digest into your gut and release hormones telling your mind that you are full and satisfied. Eat too fast and you will over consume as your mind is not getting these signals fast enough for you to stop eating.

Take a Hike. Just like our brethren walked through the dessert, relive the Passover story by taking a walk around your block. Although not quite as dramatic, keeping your body moving during the holiday will aid in weight management and allow you to feel better and more in control of your body.

The best part about these tips is they apply to everyday life. Passover or just another day, these guidelines will help you stay on track and take control of your health.

Beth Warren holds a Master’s of Science degree in Nutrition from Brooklyn College. She is a freelance foods writer, nutrition consultant and runs a private practice specializing in pediatric and adult weight management, diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease in Brooklyn, NY. She also writes her own blog at www.myfoodthoughts.com

 

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Shirley’s Low Fat Apple Crisp

kosher dessert recipes, kosher recipes, rosh hashanah desserts

Shirley’s Low Fat Apple Crisp

2 Comments 06 February 2011

My daughter Shirley has been experimenting with new recipes as a newlywed and she is determined to buy lots of low fat healthy ingredients. She used to complain that I was the only mother who sent in organic apples for third grade snack  and she still recalls the sound of the thud that the whole apple made as it hit the bottom of the classroom garbage can. I never understood how she ended up with all those Laffy Taffy wrappers in her jacket pockets…

“Hi Mom

I made this Low Carb Apple Crisp recipe for you for Shabbat. Enjoy!

Love,

Shirley”

Ingredients:

  • 4  Organic Baking Apples (honey crisp apples are delicious)
  • 1/4 cup quick cooking oatmeal
  • 1/4 cup whole grain pastry flour
  • 1/3 cup firmly packed light brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 4 Tbsp Earth Balance Buttery Spread (if mixture seems dry- add a little more)
  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.
  2. spray an 8×8-inch baking pan with cooking spray.
  3. In a bowl, thoroughly combine the oatmeal, flour, brown sugar, cinnamon, and  Earth Balance margarine.
  4. Peel, core, and thinly slice the apples.
  5. Spread the apple slices evenly over the surface of the baking pan.
  6. Sprinkle the oatmeal-flour mixture over the apples.
  7. Bake in the preheated over for 30 minutes or until the apples are tender and the topping is golden brown.
  8. Serve warm, topping each serving with 1/4 cup frozen parve ice cream.

Makes 8 servings. Double or triple the recipe for a big crowd.

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Sweet and Spicy Butternut Squash Soup

kosher pareve recipes, kosher recipes, kosher soup recipes, kosher vegetable recipes, rosh hashanah pasta, salads, and lunch ideas

Sweet and Spicy Butternut Squash Soup

2 Comments 04 February 2011

by Ayelelet R.

We all know an apple a day keeps the doctor away, but there are other fruits out there that help keep us healthy. Butternut squash is actually a fruit; it is actually linked closely with the pumpkin! It is full of heart-healthy vitamins, a lot of fiber, and is a natural way to get folate. Folate is important for women in their child-bearing years, as it prevents birth defects. You will find it added to many baked goods in the supermarket, but natural accumulation of vitamins is always recommended. Luckily, this soup has butternut squash AND apples, so you can feel good about taking seconds (or thirds!) of this soup.

With immersion blenders a staple in everyone’s kitchen these days, it’s become really easy to whip up your favorite pureed vegetable soup. I got the idea to add apples to butternut squash soup from Ina Garten, but decided that her soup was too sweet and needed something to pack some extra punch. Halve the pepper if you are going to serve this soup to kids. Either way, this soup will take your taste buds for a ride!

Ingredients:

  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 large spanish onions (or 4 smaller yellow onions)
  • 1 carrot
  • 2 celery sticks
  • 1 large butternut squash
  • 2 Macintosh apples
  • 1 cup vegetable stock
  • 1.5 cups water
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 5 clicks of freshly ground pepper (or 1/4 tsp)
  • 1/8 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 tsp dried thyme
  1. Heat up a large stockpot on medium low flame with the olive oil.
  2. Meanwhile coarsely chop the onion and add it to the stockpot. Let it sit and caramelize on a low flame for about twenty minutes.
  3. Add the carrot and celery (both coarsely chopped) to the pot and let sit another ten minutes. meanwhile, peel the butternut squash and apples, remove all seeds, and cut up into chunks.
  4. Add them to the pot and mix around with the other vegetables.
  5. Add the stock, water, and spices. Bring to a boil and then cover, letting it simmer for about an hour.
  6. At this point, all of the fruits and vegetables should be soft. Turn off the flame, let it cool for a little bit, and then immersion blend everything together. If you don’t have an immersion blender, you can pour the soup into a regular blender or food processor and puree in that. However, you must cool down the soup for a longer period of time if you are going to transfer to a blender otherwise you run the risk of burning yourself!
  7. At this point, I return everything to the pot and taste it. I usually add salt, pepper and thyme until it tastes right to me. I usually add more cayenne pepper until there is enough heat to my liking.  If you like your soup creamier, you can also add 1/2 cup skim milk or soy milk and gently reheat the soup.
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Going Vegan- The New Trend

kosher recipes

Going Vegan- The New Trend

No Comments 02 February 2011

Have you heard? The whole world is going vegan! Well, not quite. But more and more, people are turning to veganism as a healthy way of life.

Veganism in a nutshell, is a diet without any animal products or bi-products– no meats, no dairy, no eggs. Some “black belt vegans” don’t even consume honey or wear leather, wool, or silk.

This might sound limiting, but if you’re a foodie, you can really get creative and put together delicious, satisfying and health-boosting meals.  In fact, your repertoire might actually grow!

The video above is great snack for a beginner  -Easy Roasted Chickpeas!

Nowadays we are lucky to live in an age where there is a tasty substitute for every animal based product. Now, some people love fake meats (me!), while others despise them with a fiery passion and stick with the basics — making the most of grains, fruits and vegetables. That, of course, is okay too.

The benefits of giving up animal products are many. Veganism has been proven to help combat high cholesterol and high blood pressure, diabetes and various cancers!

Vegan foods are, by nature, cholesterol free, and a diet based on grains, roots, fruits, vegetables, nuts and beans make you smarter, more attractive and immortal. Okay maybe that last part was a bit of hyperbole, but if you do it right you will feel noticeable better (if a bit gassy at first. Be forewarned, this can be a side effect of changes in diet.), Get enough protein from tofu, seitan and other meat substitutes, and animals everywhere will be extra nice to you (They can smell it, I swear).

Wondering what the difference is between vegan and vegetarian? Check Dr. Weil’s daily blog for answers.

Whether you’re just interested in sampling veganism or are committing to it forever, there are a loads of books to peruse,

kosher vegan foods to taste , and kosher vegan restaurants to try.

There are a ton of delicious vegan and vegetarian recipes HERE on The New York Times website.

For great breakfast ideas check out the kitchn’s 10 Vegan Breakfast Ideas.

And last but not least, if you are seriously contemplating never eating meat again, then read this.

What do you think of the vegan trend? Comment below!

Andrea Wachner

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Allergy-Free Challah- Mom With a Mission

kosher bread recipes, kosher recipes

Allergy-Free Challah- Mom With a Mission

11 Comments 01 February 2011

Enjoy this Kosher Recipe for Allergy Free Challah

Challah with a Mission

By Rachel Ornstein Packer

When my son was diagnosed with severe food allergies, (eggs, nuts and citrus), I realized that I, along with so many others, was now faced with a mission…to keep my son safe, and educate others in the process.   Food allergies are terrifying and daunting, and for the first few months, I was a deer in the headlights.  Slowly, I started to get a handle on things as I researched, experimented, failed and succeeded.

It took a while for a virtual non-baker like me to get the hang of baking without eggs, but I did.  One of my first projects was to learn how to bake challah because I wanted my son to continue to enjoy his favorite Friday night ritual, safely.   I found that it was easier, safer and tastier to make it myself, rather, than to relentlessly ask questions at the bakery which only yielded non-chalant responses that could result in a potentially life threatening episode.

Often, my guests ask me for this kosher recipe and as part of my mission, I now pass it on to you.  Another benefit of this challah (aside from the fact that it is ridiculously simple) is that it is cholesterol free for those family members or guests who are on restricted diets.  Enjoy!

Kosher Recipe : Challah with a Mission

Ingredients for this Kosher Recipe

  • 1-cup warm water (approx. 105-115 degrees)
  • 4 ¼ cups flour (I use 3 cups unbleached flour and 1 ¼ whole-wheat pastry flour
  • 2 ½ tsp. rapid rise yeast
  • 1/3- cup sugar (I use Florida Crystals because they are less processed)
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 2 TBSP. canola oil

Egg Replacer-Whisk these together briskly with a whisk or fork

(These three recipe ingredients work as a binding agent.  The “fizzing” that occurs when whisked together provides the “lift” to the finished product).  Make sure you add the egg replacer right before the flour-see Notes for Great Challah below).

Kosher Recipe Directions

  • Pour yeast into warm water along with a pinch of sugar in a large bowl and mix until combined.
  • Let the mixture to rest for 5 minutes or so until bubbly and creamy (I usually measure out the flour while waiting for the yeast)
  • Add the sugar, salt, and additional 2 TBSP. of canola oil and mix.
  • Beat the egg replacer with a whisk (it will fizz) and pour into the yeast mixture.
  • Add the flour, a cup at a time until it is difficult to stir the mixture.
  • Transfer the dough to a lightly floured surface and knead it until it is smooth and elastic (approximately 7-10 minutes).  It should be springy.
  • Transfer dough to a lightly oiled bowl. Cover with a slightly damp cloth or plastic wrap and set in a warm place for 90 minutes.  It should double in size.
  • Transfer to a lightly floured surface and cut dough into two equal halves.
  • Divide each piece into three pieces and roll out into 10-12 inch ropes.
  • Pinch the ends together and proceed to braid the dough.
  • Place on parchment lined baking sheet and let rise for additional 30 minutes.
  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees
  • Bake for approximately 25-30 minutes depending on your oven.
  • Kosher Recipe for ' No-Egg' Challah

    Kosher Recipe for ' No-Egg' Challah

  • Kosher Recipe for ' No-Egg' Challah

Notes for Great Challah:

  • Add the egg replacer right before adding the flour. The reaction between the ingredients is what will give your challah lift (in lieu of eggs).  If you put it in first, you will not have as much of a reaction when you add the flour.
  • If you are looking for a healthier option, try using a cup or two (I use 1¼ cup) of Whole Wheat Pastry Flour.  It has all the nutrition of its whole-wheat flour counterpart, (4 grams of fiber, and 3 grams of protein per ¼ cup) though because it is ground from the wheat berry, it yields a far more delicate consistency.
  • Make sure you preheat your oven.
  • Baking powder needs to be relatively fresh.  Old baking powder will yield a hard, flat challah.
  • If you put the dough in the oven to rise, make sure the oven isn’t hot.  Turn it to 200 degrees for 20 seconds and then turn it off, otherwise it will bake the dough prematurely and it won’t rise well.
  • You can shape these challahs into rounds or rolls.
  • You can also add raisins, chocolate chips.  Use your creativity.  My kids love it when I brush a little oil to the top of the challah and then sprinkle with a dusting of Florida Crystal sugar before baking.

Enjoy this Kosher Recipe for Allergy Free Challah

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How to Make Authentic Italian Potato Gnocchi

kosher recipes, kosher rice and pasta recipes

How to Make Authentic Italian Potato Gnocchi

2 Comments 01 February 2011

By Lisa C.

Gnocchi are delicious little Italian potato dumplings that make for a very elegant and impressive meal or side dish.  They are on the menu at pretty much any Italian restaurant, but Gnocchi are surprisingly simple to make at home.  They do require some time and effort, but it is well worth it for some authentic Italian dining right from your own kitchen.

I tried this Gnocchi recipe with both white and whole wheat flour. It worked great both ways, but I will say that the white version tasted much more authentic.  Personally, I happen to love the flavor of whole wheat things (plus, all of the added health benefits), so I loved both versions, but there was definitely a big difference between the two.  Try it out and see which one you like best!

Anyway, here is what you will need to make your own Gnocchi:

  • About 2 lbs. russet potatoes
  • 1.5-2 cups flour
  • ¼ tsp. salt
  • 1 egg

Start by washing and baking your potatoes at 350°F until they can be easily pierced with a fork, about 1 hour.  Once they are baked, let them cool until they are easy enough to handle and peel off the skins (after they are cooked, the skins should come right off).

Next, you need to mash your potatoes.  It is really important that they be light and fluffy with no lumps – the best way to do this is with a ricer or potato mill.  I don’t have one, so I put them through a cheese grater.  You could probably also just mash them by hand – just make sure there are no lumps.

See how light and fluffy they look?  Now, mix in the egg and salt.

Now, you will start to add your flour.  You want to keep adding it, little by little, until the dough comes together in a ball that doesn’t stick too much to your hands – you should need about 1.5-2 cups, but use more or less than that if you need to.  Remember: the more flour you add, the heavier your gnocchi will be – so you want to add as little as possible.

Your dough should look something like this.

Now, on a floured surface, take a ball of dough about the size of your fist and roll it into a log.  With a sharp knife, cut the log into little “pillows.”  Aren’t they cute?  Once you have all of your pillows cut, drop them into boiling water in batches – if you put too many in at once, they will stick together.

The gnocchi are finished cooking about one minute after they float.  This is a pretty fast process – they should only take 3-5 minutes to cook.  When they are done, drain them and put them in a bowl.

Now, you can top them with whatever sauce you want.  I went with tomato sauce and parmesan cheese (yum!), but the sky’s the limit – try pesto, butter and sage, olive oil and garlic, or whatever you like.

Enjoy!

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