Leek and Swiss Chard “Edjeh” “Latkes”-Syrian Jewish Simanim Recipes

kosher recipes, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes, rosh hashanah simanim, rosh hashanah vegetables

Leek and Swiss Chard “Edjeh” “Latkes”-Syrian Jewish Simanim Recipes

No Comments 30 August 2012

Leek Edjeh Simanim Recipe #1 :

by my mother in law- Shirley Mamiye:

Leek is one of the “simanim “(or symbols) that we use on our Rosh Hashanah (the Jewish New Year) table that symbolizes the fact that we would like to get rid of our enemies.

Swiss chard is another symbol which means “to remove” or “throw out’ as translated by the Arabic word “sillek”.

No better way to express that sentiment  on Rosh Hashanah than with yummy sautéed “edjehs”.

Edjeh sandwiches typically made their way into all of our parent’s brown bagged lunches when they attended the public school system  in the 30’s and 40’s. It was a delicious easy “pack and go in a pita” (which was then called Syrian bread). Little did their Aleppo born mothers realize that their kids would be so terribly embarrassed to eat their very un-American looking parsley-potato variations of “edjeh” that were snuggled in a foreign round white pocket bread.

LOL- Fast forward 80 years later- I google “Edjeh” and find the top “edjeh” search on America’s very own Martha Stewart!!(Sent in to Martha by my friend Suzanne Sasson of Kitchen Caboodles).

Since Syrian Jews have adopted so many Ashkenaz foods over the years, (like challah and matzo ball soup), maybe the web will finally allow us to return the favor, and share our Syrian simanim versions with the rest of the Jewish community. My mother in law is so creative with all of her dishes, and I am always amazed that she whips up her leek and swiss chard versions of edjeh by the end of the summer each year.

Her swiss chard edjeh contains chopped meat so as not to confuse her guests with the leek edjeh version which is meatless.

Remember that you can eat these edjeh sandwiches way after Rosh Hashanah! Delicious on Sukkot  or as a Shabbat lunch.

 

Edjeh Leek Simanim Recipe #1 for Rosh Hashanah:

by my mother in law- Shirley Mamiye:

  • 1 bunch of leek- cleaned and diced, discard heavy green leaves ( I saute the leek for 2 minutes before mixing with other ingredients).
  • 4 eggs
  • 1/4 c matzo meal
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp allspice
  • 1 lb chop meat
  1. Mix all together in a bowl with a fork.
  2. Spoon latkes sized circles into a heated  fry in a pan that has a coating of  oil.
  3. When underside of edjeh is brown, turn over and fry other side.
  4. When done, place on paper towel to drain.
  5. Place on a tray with wax paper, freeze and when frozen place in a food storage bag.
  6. Before serving warm on a tray at 350 degrees.

Swiss Chard Edjeh:

  1. 2 bunches, wash very well
  2. boil in water for 2 minutes
  3. drain and chop
  4. add 4 eggs, matzo meal, salt allspice cinnamon, and a chopped onion.
  5. Fry latkes sized edjehs as above.

Leek Edjeh Simanim recipe #2:

From The Kosher Foodies-  By identical kosher gourmand twins-Jessica and Stephanie.

“We actually make our leeks into small latkes, quite similar to the tasty Chanukah treat. They’re delicious this way – crispy, tasty, and small. Not breaded like onion rings, but with the same flavor.”

Ingredients:

  • 2-3 large leeks, or 4-5 small leeks, washed well and chopped (don’t try to grate them on a box grater. They will get stringy)
  • 1/2 cup breadcrumbs or matzah meal
  • 2 eggs
  • Egg white from one egg
  • Salt and pepper
  • Vegetable oil, for frying

Directions:

1. Prepare oil for frying: pour about 1/2 inch of oil into a high-walled pan. Place on burner over medium heat.

2. Combine leeks, eggs, and breadcrumbs. Mix to combine. Check consistency. If it’s too dry, add the egg white. If too wet, add more bread crumbs. The batter should be loose but be able to come together into a ball if squeezed. Add salt and pepper.

3. Using a tablespoon measure, scoop out batter into balls.

4. Test the frying oil with a tiny amount of batter. Make sure it sizzles but doesn’t burn. Prepare a plate or tray to drain the patties after frying. I used a paper towel-lined plate. My grandmother used to use brown paper bags (yes, the ones from the grocery store). Alton brown uses a cooling rack on top of a towel-lined cookie sheet. That’s probably the best idea if you can do it.

5. Using a slotted spoon, drop the batter, one at a time, into the oil, flattening into patties as you drop them. Only put 5-4 in the oil at a time, because you don’t want the temperature to drop too much and the patties to get soggy.

6. After one minute, they should be brown. Flip the patties. Fry on the other side for a minute. Remove from oil with slotted spoon and place on draining plate. Repeat until all are fried.

7. Sprinkle with salt when still warm.

8. Serve along with the bracha: “that those who hate us be cut away”

Shana tova!

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At Least 10 Hamud Soup Versions for the Syrian Jewish Shabbat Meal

kosher meat recipes, kosher recipes, kosher soup recipes, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes, shabbat recipes, Sukkot Recipes

At Least 10 Hamud Soup Versions for the Syrian Jewish Shabbat Meal

2 Comments 28 August 2012

You can typically smell the aromas of the lemony-minty hamud that has been cooking for hours on the stove of a Syrian Jewish household on a Friday afternoon.

Hamud is the Syrian version of the Ashkenaz chicken soup. It includes a  medley of usually 3 vegetables- carrots, potatoes, and celery, treasured kibbe balls are thrown in midway-and is served over white or brown rice.

The kibbe ball was always an art form and a source of pride for every Syrian Jewish mom, and rightfully so. It represented the love and time spent on each dish prepared for the family, especially on a Friday night. I’m sure that 99 percent of my generation’s Syrian women do remember that their mothers and grandmother used to sit at the dinette table rolling their kibbe homda balls to perfection, nowadays, the time to make the kibbe balls has eroded as the women run out to work, exercise, or run on daily errands. These errands usually incude a trip to the local kosher butcher in Brooklyn, NY who hire ladies to roll and pack the kibbe ball for us. You can even find turkey kibbe balls on the market today.

As a side note, I remember the day that I asked my husband’s grandmother to teach me how to make kibbe balls. She told me where to buy the 2 kinds of meat that we needed for the kibbes. I must have purchased the meat on a Monday, left it in the fridge, and gotten involved with shopping and manicures for 4 or 5 days. On Friday, I proudly brought over the meat. It had turned brown and slightly smelly by then, but as a new bride, I hardly noticed. Well. needless to say, she sent me right home with that meat! I don’t think she ever got around to teaching me how to roll the kibbes, but I did learn that you shouldn’t leave raw meat sitting in the fridge for a week.

I would love to see our families preserve as much of our Syrian Jewish heritage, especially with all of the horrible news reports about the destruction in Aleppo and Damascus which was the home for our Syrian Jewish community for thousands of years.  For interesting info about what’s happened to our communities’ rich cultural structures and heritage in Aleppo and Damascus click over to this article by Tablet Magazine written by fellow community member Joseph Dana over in Israel.

Here are some kibbe homda variations sent in by some ladies of our community.  Below is the Instagram thread that started this whole post! Please send in your kibbe homda variations to marlene (at) thejewishhostess.com and I will add them in.

By the way- you can always see what The Jewish Hostess Hostess is up to- just follow me on Instagram!

Share and enjoy!

Deal Delights Cookbook Adaptation for Hamud:

1- This is the version the I use from the red Deal Delights cookbook. I’ve added 1/2 cup of tamarind sauce (ourt) and a whole potato that boils with the mixture and gets mashed at the end to add to the thickness of the sauce.

Hamud Ingredients:

  • 1 qt water
  • 1 large potato – cubed
  • 1 large whole potato
  • 2 stalks celery cubed
  • 2 carots peeled and diced
  • 2-4 cloves garlic
  • juice of 2 lemons
  • 1/2 tsp kosher salt
  • palmful of crushed mint leaves

Bring vegetables to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes.

Crush garlic with the back of a pyrex cup and mash with kosher salt. Add to vegetables.

Add lemon juice and mint leaves. Simmer for 10 minutes. Add 1/2 cup of tamarind sauce (I love Mrs Maslaton’s ourt sold at Kosher Corner in Brooklyn).

Cook for about 1 hour covered.

Add kibbe – simmer uncovered about 1/2 hour- 45 minutes.

Mash the whole potato when soft to add to thicker consistency.

2- Kibbe Homda Recipe by Odette Tebele Rishty:

“Probably the toughest recipe ever …to give exact measurements and directions for. All grandmas give it over like this… Then you put the lemon juice and we say how much sito? And they say ‘just put!’. Then you put the salt and we say how much and they say ‘just put!’ haha. The point is to know exactly what you want it to taste like and a cook who is comfortable in their kitchen and is experienced with food will get it.

This is a Halab recipe. (Alleppo syria) My grandma left there and went to Mexico and married at 16 in Mexico. This recipe’s end result is an orange to red looking Hamud.   Its salty lemony sauce has sugar added but only a drop enough to enhance .. The sweetness is not tasted —I’ve tasted within my own grandmas daughters a slightly sweeter version and my grandmas was even less sweet – my mom’s Adela (Chayo )Tebele. ah’ was in deed the best! This is how I make it and she loved my Hamud!

I don’t have time to give directions-  I think anyone can figure it out if they make Hamud ! All mom’s son in laws and grandchildren loved this Hamud the best! Egyptian son in law included! She’d get visits for leftovers from son in laws and older grandchildren and grandchildren bringing her great grandchildren for another taste even on a Monday for leftovers!

  • Lots Celery
  • Lots Carrots
  • 1 lg onion onion small slithers cook til just clear not more(that is the first thing in the pot with a little oil )
  • Water fill till half of pot (med to large pot)
  • 1 marrow bone this adds tons of flavor
  • 1Can of tomato sauce (small can for med pot , large can for a really big pot)
  • Lemon juice (at least two cups maybe more will be needed as you go along)
  • 2-3 tablespoons of sugar
  • 1 peeled potato cut up in small chunks
  • Crushed garlic 3-4 cloves ,dry mint leaves crushed kosher salt and oil 1-2 tbsp to make paste and add to Hamood soup as cooking
  • Probably will need to add salt a few times.

Taste and add ingredients if needed after a good 15 minute boil. Then add kibbes when ur happy with the taste (so your not meat for the day- If you need to still have coffee & the like :)  )Then allow it to cook for at least 45 min covered slightly ajar .. .Bubbling slightly then lower the flameMy sister variated to this and I honed in on it – and asked her secret -she added a fresh lemon and a fresh lime (either or can be used but i use both including the juicy inside

pieces ) squeezed into the soup — along with the usual store bought lemon juice — it definitely enhances the flavor to be more Middle Eastern as it creates a stronger more delicacy-like robust flavor.
(for a really big Hamud pot I would say not to double the ingredients- a little less than double)
Anyone can email me for questions if anything is unclear or they need help with it.  Itsallagift1@aol.com.
When I was finally able to make Hamud good everytime it was my proudest moment to be able to carry on the tradition!
My mom’s magic is working– to keep a family coming back for visits– now my married daughter makes sure to come back for Hamood and tries to even take some home after shabbat for my granddaughter who just started eating regular food — she loves it too!!!Happy hamud perfecting! May the tradition-carrying force be with you! “
Odette (Tebele )Rishty

 

3-  Kibbe Homda by Lisa Ades:

Sour Spearmint Sauce/Soup with Meatballs (Hamud) by Lisa Ades

  • 5 medium boiling potatoes, peeled and cut in
  • 1 lb ground beef
  • salt
  • 1 1/2-inch pieces
  • 3 stalks celery, diced
  • 1 lb. veal stew meat, cut into 1 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1-2 cups fresh lemon juice
  • 1 head garlic, clves peeled and minced
  • 1/2 cup dried spearmint
  • 1/2 cup sugar

Place ground beef in a large bowl. Season with salt, mix well, then
shape into 1″ meatballs. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside.

Place potatoes, celery, veal, lemon juice, garlic, spearmint, and sugar
in a large pot. Add 8 cups water and bring to a boil over high heat.
Reduce heat to low, add meatballs, cover, and simmer, stirring
occasionally, for 1 hour. Using a long-handled spoon, stir soup,
mashing potatoes just enough to slightly thicken soup. Cover and
continue cooking until veal is tender, about 2 hours more.

Adjust seasoning with additional salt, sugar and lemon juice, if
necessary. Ladle into bowls or serve over rice.

 

4- Jen Ashkenazi- from my grandma’s cookbook:

“Cooking with Grandma” was made by the Children & Grandchildren of Marjorie Ashkenazie A”H.  We were all able to pick our favorite recipe from our Grandmother & write a small story from the memories that brought us back to that recipe . This cookbook is my favorite tool in the kitchen because I know my grandmother is watching over me & guiding me in the correct direction .

“Cooking With Grandma” can be purchased online from the below Link ;

http://www.blurb.com/bookstore/detail/2430715?alt=Cooking+with+Grandma+-+revised+edition%2C+as+listed+under+Cooking

 

5- Kibbe Homda by Sara Ash

  • Water
  • Crushed garlic
  • Lemon juice real lemon
  • Kosher salt
  • Fresh mint
  • Chopped celery carrots potatoes
  • Jerusalem glatt kibbe balls bought from the kosher butcher on East 8 in Brooklyn, NY.
“Kibbe meat is the best if u make your own …
Fill medium size pot 3/4 full w/ water crushed garlic and salt bring to boil . Add 1 bunch of fresh mint chopped ..bring to boil add lemon juice from bottle count to 12 .
Bring to boil add carrots and celery boil for 10 add kibbe balls and potatoes .
Boil until potatoes get soft .. Consistency will be thicker .. Flame should be low …
My families favorite I never make enough!”

 

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Rosh Hashanah Tropical Brights! Thank You Lorene Sasson!!

holiday table settings, rosh hashanah table setting ideas, rosh hashanah table settings

Rosh Hashanah Tropical Brights! Thank You Lorene Sasson!!

No Comments 27 August 2012

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Enjoy this Rosh Hashanah 2011 inspiration…

Thanks Lorene for another stunning holiday table setting! I love your tropical greens, reds and oranges! Those colors make me so happy and in the mood yet to eat ANOTHER holiday meal!!!

These festive colors and easy runner idea is also great for a Sukkot table!

Shana Tova!! Marlene

Hey Marlene,

Shana Tova!

I did the first night by me and it was just a few of us. My kids colored little Shofar name cards, and because I love the colors of the dates,apples and poms I had to make a centerpiece with them. Here’s my table! Enjoy!
from Lorene Sasson
p.s. The green runner is actually a sheer window panel from Ikea.  And the plates are from Amazing Savings!
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Easy and Delicious Marshmallow Baked Alaska  by Marie Tourgueman

hanukka recipes and tablesettings, kosher dessert recipes, kosher pareve recipes, kosher recipes, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes, rosh hashanah desserts, Sukkot Recipes

Easy and Delicious Marshmallow Baked Alaska by Marie Tourgueman

2 Comments 26 August 2012

 

image courtesy of homedesign.marthastewart.com

Jewish Hostesses have no fear! The goal of being a Jewish Hostess is NOT to feel like we are slaves again in Egypt!!!!

Rather the goal is to create delicious holiday meals plus yummy desserts that get onto the table beautifully, in one piece, and not want to kill ourselves in the proccess!!!!

Thank you Marie Tourgeman for this delicious recipe. Marie knows how to entertain in style PLUS has her thriving business organizing closets, kitchens and offices to perfection in the New York area. Contact her at mtorgueman@yahoo.com for more info!

Baked Alaska

by  Marie Torgueman

  1. Line sides and bottom of Pyrex with chocolate chip cookies.
  2. Fill Pyrex with softened ice cream flavor of your choice.
  3. Sprinkle and cover with mini marshmallows and chocolate chips.
  4. Freeze to harden the ice cream.
  5. Before serving place in oven and Broil a few minutes until marshmallows are toasted but not burnt.
  6. Serve immediately and watch it disappear!
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Easy Shabbat Cornish Hens with Roasted Potatoes by Sarah Harari

kosher chicken recipes, kosher main dish recipes, kosher passover recipes,seder table Ideas, kosher recipes, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes, rosh hashanah chicken recipes

Easy Shabbat Cornish Hens with Roasted Potatoes by Sarah Harari

No Comments 25 August 2012

Sarah Harari is know to be a gourmet kosher cook within the Syrian Jewish Community.

I know that any Shabbat recipe from Sarah will go straight onto my Shabbat and Jewish holiday menus!!!

Shabbat Cornish Hens with Roasted Potatoes by Sarah Harari

  • 2 cornish hens, cleaned
  • 3/4 c honey
  • 3/4 cup orange juice
  • 4 cloves of garlic, chopped
  •  1 red onion, chopped .
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • salt and pepper.
  1. Place 2 cornish hens in a roaster.
  2. Mix  all ingredients in a measuring cup and mix well with a fork or emulsion blender.
  3. Pour mixture on top of cornish hens.
  4. Marinating overnight is preferable.
  5. Cook uncovered at 350 for an hour or until top is lacquered and juices run clear.
  6. Roast 2 lbs. of peeled and cubed pototoes in a tray with salt, pepper, paprika, garlic salt, and  oil.
  7. Add the roasted potatoes on bottom of the roaster and heat roasted potatoes together with the  roasted cornish hens for about 45 minutes before serving.
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Whole Wheat Honey Challah- Plus a 6 Braid Challah How-to Video

kosher challah recipes, kosher recipes, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes

Whole Wheat Honey Challah- Plus a 6 Braid Challah How-to Video

4 Comments 25 August 2012

please “like” this post!!!

Challah is truly a labor of love that I had the opportunity to experience when I told myself that if I actually ever won a Bosch mixer at a Chinese Auction, I would attempt this grand feat. Miraculously I did win, and I’ve been making my own ever since. I’m so glad that I found this video of Hadassah Sabo Milner braiding a six strand challah which really comes out so much prettier than the traditional three braided challah. This video wins every other one on the ‘net- I watched them all and picked the best one for us all to share. Thanks Hadassah!

There is really nothing better than the feeling of actually making your own dough, watching it rise, punching it down, braiding, brushing egg on top, separating some dough for the prayer, saying the hafrashat challah prayer, baking,cooling, warming it  before kiddush,  setting the challah on the table with a challah cover, saying hamotzie, dipping in salt (or sugar on the Rosh Hashanah table) and finally  watching the head of the rip off pieces (Syrian tradition) and throwing them in age order to each family member to FINALLY watch everyone gobble it  up. (WHEW!)

I’ve been making this Whole Wheat Honey Challah with  Zaatar  lately from the Magen David Yeshivah Chef At Home cookbook.

Contact Yvonne if you would like to purchase one. Perfect hostess gift for the upcoming Jewish holidays! The gourmet kosher cookbook also has some great recipes for your Rosh Hashanah and Sukkot menus!

Magen David Yeshivah's Brand New Gourmet Cookbook

Whole Wheat Honey Challah Ingredients:

  •  2 strips of yeast
  • 4 cups of warm water
  • 1 cup plus 1 tbsp sugar, divided
  • 3 heaping tbsp coarse salt
  • 8 cups white flour
  • 8 cups whole wheat flour (note- I believe that the MDY cookbook has a misprint here- the book says 4 cups)
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 cup cold pressed safflower oil
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • grease for the bowl
  • egg white to brush
  • sesame seeds, zaatar or everything spice for topping
  1. Mix yeast with warm water ( first mix the 2 cups of boiling water with 2 cups of ice cold water in the bowl, then add 1 tablespoon of sugar and then yeast)
  2. In a Kitchen Aid combine 1 cup sugar, salt, flours, eggs, honey, and oil. Mix and then add yeast mixture for 10- 12 minutes.
  3. Transfer to a large greased bowl and cover. Set aside for an hour.
  4. Remove dough and braid in 3 or braid a 6 braid challah for a prettier and more evenly cooked challah. If you family likes a doughier challah then stick with the 3 braid.
  5.  If you are adding raisins for Rosh Hashanah then rollout your braids in a long, flat shape, add raisins and  then roll into a log. Soaking the raisins in warm water first helps to make them softer and fluffier.
    photo from chabad.org
  6. Brush challah with egg white, add topping.
  7. Bake in a preheated oven for 10 minutes, turn the tray or switch racks for another 10 minutes.
    Variation: Braided Round Challah:An easy way to make nice, round, braided challahs  for Rosh Hashanah is by taking three long strands and braiding them into a very long braid shaped log.After this has been braided, carefully tie it up as if you are making one large knot out of it, and leave it to rise.Related articles
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Sweet Maple Chicken for  Rosh Hashanah

kosher chicken recipes, kosher meat recipes, kosher recipes, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes, rosh hashanah chicken recipes

Sweet Maple Chicken for Rosh Hashanah

2 Comments 25 August 2012

Start Planning your  sweet  Jewish New Year menu  now with this Maple sweetened  holiday chicken- a proven winner on the dinner table!

  • 1 cup apple cider or juice
  • ¼ cup maple syrup
  • 2 tbs veg oil
  • 2 tbs soy sauce
  • 2 star anise
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 6 unpeeled garlic cloves
  • ½ tsp red hot pepper flakes (optional)
  • 6 chicken thighs
  1. -       In a pitcher or bowl, whisk together apple cider, maple syrup, oil, and soy sauce. Add star anise, cinnamon stick, garlic and hot pepper.
  2. -       In a large freezer bag or bowl, add chicken. Pour the cider mixture over and seal bag or cover bowl. Refrigerate overnight or up to 2 days.
  3. -       Remove marinated mixture from fridge and heat oven to 400 deg. Pour contents of bag or bowl (including liquid) into a large roasting pan. Turn chicken skin side up.
  4. -       Roast chicken  about 1 hour  leaving chicken skin side up until cooked.

by Marie Torgueman

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Sicilian Eggplant Meat Rollups for the Jewish Holidays

kosher main dish recipes, kosher meat recipes, kosher recipes, kosher thanksgiving recipes, kosher vegetable recipes, rosh hashanah roast , lamb, and brisket recipes

Sicilian Eggplant Meat Rollups for the Jewish Holidays

No Comments 24 August 2012

Use Eggplants to create Sicilian Eggplant - Chopped Meat Casserole

by Vivien Hidary

Sicilian eggplants are sweeter and creamier than any other variety of eggplant. My friend Vivien, a gourmet cook, makes sure that this stuffed eggplant dish is on most of her Jewish holiday menus because its a family favorite! It can be prepared in advance, frozen, and baked before serving.

How to Create this Kosher Dish:

- Peel and slice about 4 sicilian eggplants and place on a tray sprayed with Pam.

- Brush a little olive oil on top of the slices.

- Bake on  350 degrees for approximately 20 minutes.

- Meanwhile, mix equal parts of chopped meat and cooked rice with allspice and salt to make filling.

- When eggplant is done roll each slice around a small mound of filling.

- Arrange in a roaster or Pyrex in rows. Cover with a mixture of water, salt (or chicken consommé) allspice and a drizzle of oil.

- Bake at 350.Bake covered. .

These eggplants are soft and the perfect comfort food . You can also bake them whole and eat with a spoon! Enjoy!

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How to Check The Simanim for Insects

kosher recipes, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes, rosh hashanah simanim

How to Check The Simanim for Insects

No Comments 24 August 2012

 

 

by : Linda Dayan

Most of us are familiar with the minhag (custom) of eating the different fruits and vegetables (simanim/signs) on Rosh HaShana, which are meant to represent what kind of year we really desire. For example: we dip the apple in the honey to symbolize a sweet year. There is the old joke of a Jew who put raisins on a stalk of celery… he was hoping that H-Shem would bless him with a “raise in salary…”

Yes, it is important for us to keep our minhagim, but would it be right to do something that is not permitted from the Torah – so we can eat that symbolic date or leek?

(The following info is reprinted from

The Torah prohibits us from  eating worms or any other bug. As Jewish women its our responsibility to make sure our family doesn’t ingest those miniscule critters, so therefore, as a service to our readers, we are providing information on how to check some of the simanim which we will serve on our tables in few days. Wishing you a Happy, Healthy and Kosher Year!

Given the strict Torah prohibitions against eating insects – there are five Torah commandments against eating crawling insects and six against consuming flying insects – and the tendency of bugs to find fruits and vegetables as much a part of their lifestyle as people do, it has become extremely important to check veggies and fruits for insect infestation to be certain they are kosher.

As with any agricultural product, dried fruits are subject to insect infestation concerns. The consumer should look carefully at the fruit for signs of damage, webbing, or other indicators of insect presence. Certain fruits – notably whole dried figs and dates – sometimes harbor insects in their cavities and it is advisable to split these open and scan for insects prior to eating.

Leek (Carti):

Leek must be cut at the bottom, in the area of the root, and then sliced the length of the green, separating each layer. Each layer should be held under a strong stream of running water while rubbing with one’s fingers. Alternatively, one may soak in soapy water for 2-3 minutes and rinse well.

Dry Dates (Tamar Yasvesh):

One cuts open the date lengthwise, removes the pit, and holds the date against a light source, like a window or lamp and inspects it from both sides, looking for a dark insect. A dry date may exhibit white clusters, formed from sugar and these are not bug related and not problematic.

Swiss Chard:

IN ISRAEL:

When grown regularly, the leaves are simply infested. Small worms are imbedded deep in the leaves and they are not removed by washing the leaves. Therefore, it is strongly recommended that one only use the bug-free type leaves, of course only those with a reliable hechsher (kashrut supervision). They too should be washed, in soapy water and then thoroughly rinsed.

When not using the bug-free:

Soak in cold water; add several drops of concentrated non-scented liquid detergent or vegetable wash; agitate leaves in water to wash their surface; use a heavy stream of water to remove all foreign matter and soap from surface of the leaf; check leaves under direct light.

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More Elegant  Unique Table Settings and Ideas for Rosh Hashanah

holiday table settings, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes, rosh hashanah table setting ideas, rosh hashanah table settings

More Elegant Unique Table Settings and Ideas for Rosh Hashanah

1 Comment 24 August 2012

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Rosh Hashanah Greetings to all of my Jewish Hostesses!

I’ve been really enjoying some great internet table decor inspirations and ideas for the Rosh Hashanah holiday and I’m so happy to be sharing them with you.  Please remember to snap a pic of your Rosh Hashanah table!

Always remember that when setting a holiday table, its the extra energy that you put into your creative table settings, and unique centerpieces, whether it be a formal table setting, or a casual one, plus  the energy that goes into your kosher holiday menu, that your family will keep in their hearts forever. Hopefully these easy table scape ideas for Rosh Hashanah should  give you some creative design ideas for your festive holiday table!

Wishing you all a healthy and happy holiday!!!

     

 

photo above from: Creative Jewish Mom

3 photos below from :Kineret  Specter’s Facebook page:

Rosh Hashanah Challah by Guess Who Is Coming to Dinner:

 

Honey Bee Centerpiece from HERE

 

Gorgeous Caramel Apples from HERE:

Love this apple centerpiece from Better Homes and Gardens!!!

How pretty are these apple votives???

How to Rosh Hashanah table decor from HERE :

and HERE

p.s. Subscribe Now to get the best kosher recipes, Jewish holiday table decor ideas, and discounts from your favorite shops!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Whole Wheat Panko-Encrusted Fish Tacos with Ezekial Tortillas

kosher fish recipes, kosher main dish recipes, kosher recipes, Sukkot Recipes

Whole Wheat Panko-Encrusted Fish Tacos with Ezekial Tortillas

No Comments 23 August 2012

I had my first delectable fish taco experience at  the kosher Fish Grill in LA., and ever since, then I have been wanting to  add  fish tacos to my dinner menu. There are many fish taco recipes out there, and I have modified this one by adding whole wheat Panko crumbs and the Ezekiel Tortilla wraps. Fun to serve at dinnertime allowing the family to slop on all of their ingredients, or wrap them up prettily and slide on a tooth pick for dinner guests.

Either way- its a sure fire winner recipe! Enjoy!

Whole Wheat Panko-Encrusted Fish Tacos with Ezekial Tortillas

 
  • 1 cup reduced-fat mayonnaise or Hellman’s olive oil mayonnaise
  • 3 tbsp fresh lime juice
  • 1 jalapeno, seeded and diced (1 tsp)
  • 2 tsp Dijon mustard
  • 4 eggs beaten
  • 2-3 cups panko breadcrumbs
  • 2 lb white fish fillets, cut into thin strips
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 package flour tortillas Ezekial Brand
  • 1 cup shredded cabbage
  • 1 avocado chopped
Preparation:

1. For the sauce, combine mayonnaise, lime juice,jalapeno and Dijon; refrigerate until serving.

2. Beat egg with a fork in a  shallow dish. Pour whole wheat panko on another plate and season with salt, pepper and garlic salt. Dredge each fish strip in egg mixture then in panko, pressing crumbs to adhere.

3. Heat oil to medium heat in a large sauté pan 4 minutes on each side, turning once until until golden brown or fish flakes with a fork.

4. Warm tortillas in oven for one minute. Place sauce and then sautéed fish atop tortilla. Top with shredded cabbage (coleslaw mix in a bag), avocado and salsa, if desired. Watch the video above to see how the pros wrap their tortillas!

 

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Rosh Hashanah  Cubed Fruit Salad with Pomegranate and Crystalized Sugar

kosher dessert recipes, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes, rosh hashanah desserts

Rosh Hashanah Cubed Fruit Salad with Pomegranate and Crystalized Sugar

2 Comments 22 August 2012

please “Like” this post! This is an elegant and  easy fruit salad idea that my talented and creative friend  Joanie Mann incorporated into a family party menu a while ago.  Cubed mango, pomegranate, and blueberries will be a tropical hit on your Rosh Hashanah dessert menu!

  1. Take 3 – 10 mango , depending on the amount of company you are having, and cut into fine cubes.
  2. Mix with 1-2 cups of pomegranate seeds.
  3. Add blueberries
  4. Turn martini glass edges into a bowl of water and dip to wet about 1/2 inch of the edge.
  5. Dip into coarse crystalized sugar. We used clear, but in comes in many colors.(We found crystalized sugar in Pomegranate Supermarket in Brooklyn.)
  6. Fill with cubed fruit. Serve on a linen napkin lined tray.
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Rich with Vibrant Color and Tradition- A Rosh Hashanah Table by Rosette Rutman

holiday table settings, rosh hashanah table setting ideas, rosh hashanah table settings

Rich with Vibrant Color and Tradition- A Rosh Hashanah Table by Rosette Rutman

3 Comments 22 August 2012

 (ROSH HASHANAH 2011…)

Thank you Rosette for sharing your Rosh Hashanah table all the way from Canada! The holidays really are bringing us Jewish women together! I really love when women from all over the world connect on The Jewish Hostess! Make sure you  subscribe now so you don’t miss a single kosher holiday recipe or holiday table setting idea!

Shana Tova! Marlene

 

G’mar Hatima Tova!

 I love your website!  It is so inspiring!  Half the fun of the holidays is decorating the table to get the WOW reaction! I have sent along some pictures of my Erev Rosh Hashana Table.   I had individual square white plates with little flower cups of honey and alternating red and green apple slices with pomegranate seeds sprinkled over them. Everyone had a white and gold cocktail napkin underneath at counter angles to the plate so just the corners peaked out. I also had 2 honeycombs on a typical apple platter and sprinkled them with pomegranate seeds, apple slices, real flowers and sugar bees. So they didn’t get lost on the colourful tablecloth, I put them on a white platter. 

 The table cloth is a black background with swirling rich autumn colours of gold, reds, yellows, greens and oranges in apple clusters and vine motifs. I have it in two sizes so both tables were the same.  Since I only had 16 napkins and 17 guests that night, I had to go to white and gold paper napkins.  On both tables,  I had small vases with mixed miniature roses of yellow, red and orange which I bought the day before so they all had opened up already. 

 I have several silver-plated pomegranates that I use in different ways each year – this time I displayed them on a low white platter with mixed small and large realistic-looking plastic fruit (Pottery Barn).  Not pictured here is the Lemon Poppy Seed cake that I make each year in the shape of a beehive, decorated with sugar bees – I had a line-up for seconds for it!  I got the sugar bees from a local bakery (50 of them)!

Also not pictured, but really cute were the one-bite lemon poppy seed cupcakes that I took to a first day luncheon.  I decorated the tops with a little swirl of icing and every third one had a sugar bee.  I served them on a distressed 2 tier rectangular serving platter and it was quite the hit both in presentation and taste!

Thanks for letting me share! I look forward to seeing other table settings too.

Rosette Rutman

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Pistachio Stuffed Dates for Rosh Hashanah

kosher passover recipes,seder table Ideas, kosher recipes, Passover Recipes, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes, rosh hashanah desserts, rosh hashanah simanim

Pistachio Stuffed Dates for Rosh Hashanah

No Comments 20 August 2012

recipe and photo provided courtesy of elanaspantry.com 

Use this yummy healthy and gluten free recipe as a symbolic Rosh Hashanah dessert, but more importantly, you can also use it on the dinner table as one of the simanim. On Rosh Hashanah we eat dates because it sounds like  the word “sheyitamu,” “that they be consumed.” Hence, we repeat the blessing”may… our enemies be consumed.”

Display these pretty dates on a dish that is on a pedestal, and if you are having a lot of company, buy two or three pedestal dishes and spread them along the table so that they are within reach.

Dates Stuffed with Pistachios:

  • 1 cup pistachio nuts, shelled
  • ¼ cup orange juice, freshly squeezed
  • 1 teaspoon orange zest
  • 1 pinch celtic sea salt
  • 20 large dates
  1.  In a food processor, pulse pistachios, orange juice, orange zest and salt
  2. With a sharp knife, make a slit on one side of each date and remove the pit. (Make sure you check the dates for worms and yucky crawly bugs.)
  3. Push a teaspoon of pistachio paste into each date; gently squeeze closed so that filling spills over
  4. Serve
Makes 20 stuffed dates

 

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Joan Nathan’s Juicy Brisket Braised in Pomegranate Juice

kosher meat recipes, kosher passover recipes,seder table Ideas, kosher recipes, Passover Recipes, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes, rosh hashanah roast , lamb, and brisket recipes

Joan Nathan’s Juicy Brisket Braised in Pomegranate Juice

1 Comment 20 August 2012

 

Many   brisket recipes are so deliciously sweet and sticky due to the fact that its too easy to pour sugar based sauces on top and slide it into the oven for a quick and scrumtious meal. I have to admit that very often I fall into the same sweet roast trap, but lately I’ve been on the hunt for a  “healthier” version of a kosher roast recipe that wont make my family’s blood sugar levels shoot up. I think I’ve found the right flavors here with Joan Nathan‘s recipe. Pomegranate juice adds just the right amount of sweetness, and the vegetables and herbs bring out the flavor of the meat instead of disguising it. Enjoy- and let me know how you like it! I’m planning to make it for one of the Rosh Hahanah dinners. Marlene.

 


Brisket Braised in Pomegranate Juice by Joan Nathan
reprinted with permission from Tablet Magazine.

  • One  4 ½-pound brisket
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 medium onions, peeled and coarsely chopped
  • 2 leeks, cleaned, and chopped, using the white and light green only
  • 6 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 2 large carrots, peeled and coarsely chopped
  • 1 celery stalk, peeled and coarsely chopped
  • 2 ½ to 3 cups pomegranate juice
  • 3 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 2 sprigs fresh rosemary
  • 2 bay leaves

1. Season the brisket with salt and pepper. Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a heavy pan or Dutch oven, brown the brisket on all sides, and set aside.

2. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Add the onions and leeks in the pan in which you browned the brisket, and cook until soft. Add the garlic, carrots and the celery. Continue cooking for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

3. Add 1 1/2 cups of the pomegranate juice to the pan and bring the mixture to the boil, making sure to scrape the bottom of the pan as you stir. Add another cup of pomegranate juice, the thyme, rosemary and bay leaves to the pan and allow to simmer. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

4. Return the brisket to the pan, fat-side up, spooning the vegetables and juices over the meat. Cover the pan tightly (use foil if the pan doesn’t have a lid), and braise the brisket in the oven, basting every half hour or so until the meat is tender, for about 3 hours.

5. Allow the brisket to rest before slicing and serving. (I leave it overnight in the refrigerator. The next day I cut it thin, against the grain, on the bias.) Lay the brisket over the onions and leeks and the gravy, reheat, and serve with the onion confit (see below.)

Yield: about 8 servings

Onion Confit

  • 3 large onions, peeled and cut in slivers
  • 4 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 cup red wine
  • 1 cup chicken broth

1. Sauté the onions in the oil for about 10 to 15 minutes or until they start to turn golden.

2. Add salt and pepper to taste, the sugar, the wine, and the chicken broth. Cook them, uncovered, for another 10 minutes or until the onions are very soft. Taste, adding more sugar or salt, if necessary, and serve.

 

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Rosh Hashanah Pomegranate Sangria

kosher drink recipes, kosher recipes, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes

Rosh Hashanah Pomegranate Sangria

7 Comments 20 August 2012

 

 

 

Persian Pomegranate Sangria by Joy Betesh

Every Fall I buy a case or two of Pomegranates and what we don’t get to eat I freeze. We made fresh lemonade and squeezed the pomegranate seeds into the lemonade…..it turns a gorgeous color.I used my Grandma Abadi’s manual orange juicer….works great! Add some fresh mint leaves for a refreshing drink!

 

For Syrup:
8 cups cold water
2 cups sugar
8 whole cloves
2 large cinnamon sticks
4 star anise
1 vanilla pod, split in halfFor Sangria:
1 1/2 to 2 bottles red wine, chilled in refrigerator
8 cups pomegranate juice, chilled in refrigerator
1/4 cup freshly squeezed lime juice
1 whole pomegranate, seeded1 orange, sliced into thin rounds,
then cut in half into semi-circles

1 lemon, sliced into thin rounds,
then cut in half into semi-circles

For serving:
Ice
Fresh mint leaves

1.In a heavy saucepan, combine water, sugar, cloves, cinnamon stick, star anise and split vanilla pod.2.Bring to a rapid boil over medium-high heat, then reduce to a low heat and simmer, uncovered, about 15 minutes to dissolve sugar and create a thin syrup.

3.Turn off heat and let sit 20 minutes to cool to room temperature and to allow the ingredients to marinate.

4. Strain over fine mesh strainer into a large
punch bowl or pitcher.

5. Pour in chilled wine, pomegranate juice, and lime juice. Mix well.

6. Add pomegranate seeds, orange, and lemon slices and mix again.

7. Serve in glasses with a sprig of fresh mint and 1 or 2 cubes of ice in each.

Yield: Serves 13 to 15
(makes approximately
13 eight-ounce cups of sangria)

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