Tag archive for "Aleppo"

Low-Fat Grilled Turkey Kibbeh for Thanksgiving

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Low-Fat Grilled Turkey Kibbeh for Thanksgiving

1 Comment 22 November 2013

“Who knew kibbeh could be grilled? This Turkish recipe is a healthy alternative to fried kibbeh torpedoes and is really delicious. These are easy to make – all of the ingredients are mixed together and formed into a torpedo shape. I like using a medium or coarse grain bulgur for a crunchy exterior. These are also excellent made with ground beef or lamb. Serve with pita bread, Israeli salad or fatoush, and lemon wedges. I love this as an appetizer for a holiday lunch! Perfect  for your Thanksgiving menu! Lisa Ades”

TURKEY KIBBEH KEBABS

Adapted from Food and Wine magazine

  • 1 pound ground turkey (*see note below)
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup medium or coarse grain bulgur, rinsed
  • 1/2 med. onion, finely chopped
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon Aleppo pepper (flakes, not ground)
  • lemons, cut into wedges

‘How to’ Create kibbeh

In a mixing bowl, combine the 2 tablespoons of olive oil, rinsed bulgur, onion, flour, salt, allspice, cumin and Aleppo pepper. Add ground turkey and mix well. Form the mixture into 1-by-3-inch “torpedoes”.

Grill for 5 minutes over moderately high heat, turning frequently on all sides until they are golden brown and cooked through.  You can also broil them.

Serve the turkey kebabs with pita bread warmed on the grill, salad and lemon wedges. Makes about 16. Serves 4.

* note:  This is not great with all white meat turkey – it will be very dry.

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“Thanksgivukkah” Table and Decor-Syrian Style!

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“Thanksgivukkah” Table and Decor-Syrian Style!

4 Comments 19 June 2013

 

Thanksgivukkah, Tahanksgiing, Hanukka Table Decor, 1

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Dear Hostesses,

In case you haven’t heard, the new code word for the next huge family get together is “Thanksgivukkah”. This year, in a rare alignment of calendars, Hanukka and Thanksgiving fall on November 28, 2013. Astronomers say that we won’t see this occurrence again till the year 79,811 so  I decided  to make a big deal out of this menorah/pumpkin  shidduch (or buzzrah  as they say in Arabic) by re-creating  a Syrian Jewish Hanukka table with a twist  of Thanksgiving thrown in.  Some may say that this American/Jewish holiday connection is pure coincidence, but I’m thinking that there is a greater cosmic connection that’s just waiting to be blogged about.

As Jews in America,  we are very grateful to be able to celebrate our holidays publicly without fear of being persecuted. Just the fact that we can honor the mitzvah of lighting the menorah at the front window to shout out the 8 day miracle of Hanukka is reason enough to bring out our finest china and table decor to honor our peaceful place in Jewish history. For that reason alone, we should all proudly acknowledge and celebrate Thanksgiving.   As a Sephardic Jew living in America I now understand that we are a minority of Jews residing within a minority of the larger Ashkenazi Jewish population. When our community first arrived on these shores in the 1900’s, they were quickly swept up in the wave of fellow immigrants that had also fled for a better life in the U.S.A.. Fast forward one hundred years,  the Syrian Jewish culture readily absorbed many delicious flavors from their surrounding American and Ashkenazi Jewish neighbors while still retaining the pride of their homeland. It’s no wonder I received this email from Rina Kassab who wrote,

“Hi Marlene, in Syria we had no idea what Sufganiyot is! We made Atayef with Ricotta (lebeh) and Walnuts (joz). My Atayef are ready to freeze fresh for Hanukka!
Hope u like!”

I then decided to skip the Sufganiyot and  create a Syrian style Hanukka table sweetened with a tray of sweet chopped nut filled Atayef and drizzled with shirah- a thick rose water syrup freshly made by Rina. Rina told me that on Hanukka in Syria, the Jewish women prepared 8 small glass cups that were filled with half water/half oil and then inserted a handmade wick within each one. (Whaaaat? No Jonathan Adler Menorot?)

And guess what? In Syrian, NO GIFTS were given on HANUKKA!  Gift giving was reserved for Purim!  I wonder if the Ashkenaz Jews had the tradition of eight surprise filled nights way back in the old country. Comment below if anyone you know has the answer! (Hmmm…. why do I suspect that gift giving during December in our great U.S of A evolved into a fabricated American marketing spending scheme…)

I also added in an extra candle that is lit every year by Syrian Jews whose ancestors fled Spain during the expulsion by King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella in 1492. Expelled on Tisha B’Av over 500 years ago, several Jewish families wandered for months until they stumbled upon the Syrian community of Aleppo, Syria some months later on  Hanukka eve. So grateful were this group of exiles to finally find a homeland that they lit an extra candle to commemorate this miracle. To this day many Syrian Jewish families still light an extra candle on Hanukka, some knowing the story of their wandering ancestors, and some just  following this custom by tradition without really understanding why the extra candle is illuminated.

Enjoy my “Thanksgivukkah” table! Flowers and pumpkin menorah designed by Marzan Flowers.

Photos by the talented Morris Gindi of morrisgindiphotography. Call Morris for weddings and special events! Product and architectural shoots. Check out his website HERE and Instagram feed HERE.

Thanksgivukkah 19{‘

Modern Silver Hanukka Menorah by Parci Parla in Brooklyn. Call Sherri at ((347) 587-5179 for pricing.

Orange roses  by Marzan Flowers (917)406-6259.

Thanksgivukkah, menorah,  Sephardic,Hanukkah 20

Note the extra candle lit! (Want to know why? Read it above)

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Dreidels filled with a scooped out and silver sprayed pumpkin by Marzan Flowers. Silver tray by Christofle.

Personalized napkins by ipersonalize.(Call or text Joy  718-490-7063 for more options)

 

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Custom Hanukka Straws by personalize. Call or text Joy (718)490-7063 for all of your tabletop personalizationClick here for more personalization ideas!

Blue trimmed linen napkin and blue and white Ikat tablecloth by Tabletoppers- Call or text Michelle at (646)258-0929

Custom Hanukka Place cards  with exotic blue feathers by Karens Invitations. Call Karen at (718) 339-1929

Thanksgiving Rooster Cupcake Topper by Kitchen Caboodles. Call Helen at (917)691-4599

 

Thanksgivukkah, Sephardic Hanukkah, Atayef, 17

Although I was really doing great on my diet, I didn’t even flinch when the photo shoot was over and I was able to eat an entire Atayef without a drop of guilt. My grandmother used to make these sweet crunchy treasures and each bite was worth every single calorie. Thanks Rina!!!

Thanksgivukkah 6

Thanksgivukkah 3

This fantastic silver sprayed pumpkin  menorah was designed and hand crafted by Yuval and Ina Marzan of Marzan Flowers.

Call them for your festive events, holiday tables and hostess gift arrangements at (917)406-6259.

Love this IKAT blue and white table topper by Tabletoppers- Call or text Michelle at (646)258-0929

Thanksgivukkah 4 Thanksgivukkah 5    Thanksgivukkah 8

 

 

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Delicious Hanukka cake  with Pumkins on top(!!!) designed by Rachel Benun of Flour Power. Call Rachel for your next special event! (917)881-2428

Lucite cake knife by Parci Parla (347)587-5179

 

Thanksgivukkah 12 Thanksgivukkah 14

Gorgeous multi layered wrapped gift cake by callmecookie1! Call Latifah at (347)536-9361

Wine Decanter by Pampaloni

Thanksgivukkah 16

Cake detail by  by callmecookie1! Call Latifah at (347)536-9361

Thanksgivukkah, Hanukka Cake, 15

Hope u enjoyed! XoXo

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Eggplant Rollups with Hashu (Meat) and Rice Filling

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Eggplant Rollups with Hashu (Meat) and Rice Filling

2 Comments 05 May 2013

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hashu meat, syrian style,

hashu, veal stuffing,meat stuffing, stuffing for vegetables,

Way back in the days when my grandparents resided in Syria, there was no such thing as  a huge slab of meat for the entire family,  so the women had to stretch a pound of meat by grinding and mixing it with short grain rice (faster cooking time), salt, allspice, and cinnamon.  They would stuff this “hashu” filling into the  vegetables that were bought in the local souk in the city. Of course the vegetables were laboriously  scooped upon arrival home. Fruits, vegetables and poultry from the Aleppo region were know to be organic and  extra tasty, and the former residents will passionately attest to it. I will never forget the pride of one of the women that we interviewed for the Sephardic Heritage Museum project when she said, “You haven’t even tasted a CHERRY until you’ve tasted one from Aleppo!” Fortunately, our grandparents brought the memories of the flavors of their native land, and adapted them to our American menu. I’m not actually sure if they made eggplant rollups back in Syria, but I’m sure that they stuffed their  baby eggplants with “hashu”. For a more detailed post on how to make hashu click HERE.

I really enjoy making eggplant rollups for the holidays when one meal rolls into the next because you can just pull it out of the freezer to defrost in the morning and pop into the oven a couple of hours before serving.

If you do freeze in advance, then just remember to defrost and add a little water to the edges of the pyrex before cooking!

 

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Eggplant Rollups with Hashu (Meat) and Rice Filling

Eggplant Rollups with Hashu (Meat) and Rice Filling

Ingredients

  • 1-2 lbs chop meat
  • 1/3 cup short grain rice(per lb of chop meat)
  • 1 tbsp salt
  • 1 tbsp cinnamon
  • 1 tbsp allspice
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 can of tomato sauce
  • garlic salt
  • oregano
  • 2 uniform long eggplants/sliced into long thin slices

Instructions

    Eggplant:
  1. Brush each eggplant slice with safflower oil and place on a baking tray.
  2. Bake at 350 degrees for 15-20 minutes
  3. Hashu meat filling:
  4. Mix chop meat, rice, spices and water together with cooking gloves till consistency of wet play dough.
  5. Take each long slice of eggplact and place 2-3 tablespoons of meat at the edge.
  6. Roll up each eggplant slice into a finger sized rollup and place on a pyrex one by one.
  7. Pour a can of tomato sauce over the legnth of each row of rollups.
  8. Sprinkle with garlic salt and oregano.
  9. Bake at 350 for an hour or more (cover for and hour- then uncover for about 20 minutes) till bubbly.
  10. Lefortover "hashu" can be made into torpedo shaped balls and frozen on a cookie sheet for later use.
  11. Can be thrown on top of chicken or any roast, or cholent before cooking.

Notes

May be frozen in advance. Make sure to defrost before cooking- add some water to the edges before cooking.

http://www.thejewishhostess.com/eggplant-rollups-with-hashu-meat-and-rice-filling/

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Fool, Falafel, and Tehina (Ful Medemas)- The Syrian Way!

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Fool, Falafel, and Tehina (Ful Medemas)- The Syrian Way!

7 Comments 06 February 2013

 

 

Falafel, Hummos, Falafel, The Jewish Hostess

 

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When Nina Mustacchi tagged me on Instagram with her Fool Medemas recipe, I was intrigued to know more about her, and the exact details involving this Allepian flavor infused side dish. (click HERE to see it on Insta- and if you are not on Instagram yet, then please do so because you are missing out on a lot of Jewish Hostess fun!)

Of course, an authentic dish always tastes so much better when you get the background the the food and the real chef behind it, so Nina happily shared her story with me for all of my Jewish Hostesses to enjoy.

Born in Aleppo, Syria in 1970, 15 year old Nina Maleh knew that Syria was not a welcoming  place for her her and the Syrian Jewish community that had lived there for 3,000 years. Travel restrictions, business limitations, jail time, and Nazi-type beatings inflicted by the Syrian government were commonplace among all innocent fellow community members. One by one, the Syrian Jewish community began to escape the country. Most of them trudged perilously by foot to Israel, Turkey, and Lebanon. Nina’s parents had decided to escape Syria the year before so that they could set up a home in Brooklyn for when Nina and her two brothers would be able to escape to Brooklyn.  In 1985, Nina and her two young brothers fled the country by walking 12 hours through mountainous roads to get to freedom in Turkey. Soon after, they finally  reunited with their parents in Brooklyn, N.Y. The day that 17 year old Nina stepped into her new Brooklyn home, she met her future husband, who coincidentally happened to be visiting her parents. Nina told me that the minute that he set eyes upon her, he proposed on the spot! (phew-what a trip!!)

Nina told me that every Shabbat lunch she now serves at least 15 salads- Halaby style. (Halab-meaning milk, is the Arabic word for Aleppo, known as the place where Abraham our forefather rested and fed  his camels on his journey). The Halaby Jews are known for the abundant variety of salads and mazza that they serve with every Shabbat meal. Here is the Halaby version of fool, hummos, and falafel, which is also made Egyptian style by Egyptian Jews and Arabs alike. Pita bread is usually used to scoop up this flavorful concoction.

There are 3 components to this dish:

2-The tehina- The Syrian style tehina is thicker and more lemony than the traditional more watery Israeli style of tehina. The tehina is the bottom layer.

2-  The fool- (fava beans)- The Halaby or Allepian version of fool is much more lemony than the Egyptian method. Here Nina recommends using canned fava beans as opposed to the more time consuming task of boiling dried fava beans. This is the second layer.

3- The falafel patties- made with dried chick peas, soaked overnight. The falafel patties top this dish.

Falafel, Fool,and Hummos- The Syrian Way!

Falafel, Fool,and Hummos- The Syrian Way!

Ingredients

    Tehine-
  • A jar of raw tahina
  • water
  • salt
  • lemon
  • garlic,
  • cumin to sprinkle on top.
  • Fava Bean or Fool Mixture:
  • 1 can of Fava beans
  • 2-3 heads of garlic, mashed
  • salt
  • lemon
  • cumin
  • paprika
  • olive oil
  • chopped tomatoes
  • parsley
  • Next:Top dish with falafel patties:
  • 1 bag of dried chick peas
  • 1 bunch of parsley
  • 1 bunch cilantro
  • 2 tbsp flour
  • salt, pepper

Instructions

    Tehina (bottom layer)
  1. Mix all ingredients together to taste. Should be thick like yogurt consistency.
  2. Fool (fava bean salad mixture- goes on top of tehina layer)
  3. Boil can of Fava beans for 10 minutes only.
  4. Mix with 2- 3 mashed fresh garlic,
  5. salt,
  6. lemon
  7. cumin,
  8. paprika
  9. olive oil
  10. chopped tomatoes
  11. top with chopped parsley.
  12. Add olive oil and a sprinkle of chopped parsley on top.
  13. Make the falafel patties:
  14. Soak the dried chick peas overnight.(You can't use canned chick peas)
  15. Should be soft enough to break with your nail- not soft enough to smash.
  16. Grind chick peas in Cuisinart with parsley and cilantro.
  17. Grind with 2-3 cloves of garlic with each pulse using total 1 head of garlic. Add 2 tbsp flour or a little more till you can press into firm patties.
  18. Pan fry with vegetable oil or:
  19. bake it by rolling each ball in flour, dip in olive oil, fry it lightly to keep its' shape, and then spray with Pam and bake in a cookie pan.
http://www.thejewishhostess.com/fool-falafel-and-tehina-ful-medemas-the-syrian-way/

 

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At Least 10 Hamud Soup Versions for the Syrian Jewish Shabbat Meal

kosher meat recipes, kosher recipes, kosher soup recipes, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes, shabbat recipes, Sukkot Recipes

At Least 10 Hamud Soup Versions for the Syrian Jewish Shabbat Meal

1 Comment 28 August 2012

You can typically smell the aromas of the lemony-minty hamud that has been cooking for hours on the stove of a Syrian Jewish household on a Friday afternoon.

Hamud is the Syrian version of the Ashkenaz chicken soup. It includes a  medley of usually 3 vegetables- carrots, potatoes, and celery, treasured kibbe balls are thrown in midway-and is served over white or brown rice.

The kibbe ball was always an art form and a source of pride for every Syrian Jewish mom, and rightfully so. It represented the love and time spent on each dish prepared for the family, especially on a Friday night. I’m sure that 99 percent of my generation’s Syrian women do remember that their mothers and grandmother used to sit at the dinette table rolling their kibbe homda balls to perfection, nowadays, the time to make the kibbe balls has eroded as the women run out to work, exercise, or run on daily errands. These errands usually incude a trip to the local kosher butcher in Brooklyn, NY who hire ladies to roll and pack the kibbe ball for us. You can even find turkey kibbe balls on the market today.

As a side note, I remember the day that I asked my husband’s grandmother to teach me how to make kibbe balls. She told me where to buy the 2 kinds of meat that we needed for the kibbes. I must have purchased the meat on a Monday, left it in the fridge, and gotten involved with shopping and manicures for 4 or 5 days. On Friday, I proudly brought over the meat. It had turned brown and slightly smelly by then, but as a new bride, I hardly noticed. Well. needless to say, she sent me right home with that meat! I don’t think she ever got around to teaching me how to roll the kibbes, but I did learn that you shouldn’t leave raw meat sitting in the fridge for a week.

I would love to see our families preserve as much of our Syrian Jewish heritage, especially with all of the horrible news reports about the destruction in Aleppo and Damascus which was the home for our Syrian Jewish community for thousands of years.  For interesting info about what’s happened to our communities’ rich cultural structures and heritage in Aleppo and Damascus click over to this article by Tablet Magazine written by fellow community member Joseph Dana over in Israel.

Here are some kibbe homda variations sent in by some ladies of our community.  Below is the Instagram thread that started this whole post! Please send in your kibbe homda variations to marlene (at) thejewishhostess.com and I will add them in.

By the way- you can always see what The Jewish Hostess Hostess is up to- just follow me on Instagram!

Share and enjoy!

Deal Delights Cookbook Adaptation for Hamud:

1- This is the version the I use from the red Deal Delights cookbook. I’ve added 1/2 cup of tamarind sauce (ourt) and a whole potato that boils with the mixture and gets mashed at the end to add to the thickness of the sauce.

Hamud Ingredients:

  • 1 qt water
  • 1 large potato – cubed
  • 1 large whole potato
  • 2 stalks celery cubed
  • 2 carots peeled and diced
  • 2-4 cloves garlic
  • juice of 2 lemons
  • 1/2 tsp kosher salt
  • palmful of crushed mint leaves

Bring vegetables to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes.

Crush garlic with the back of a pyrex cup and mash with kosher salt. Add to vegetables.

Add lemon juice and mint leaves. Simmer for 10 minutes. Add 1/2 cup of tamarind sauce (I love Mrs Maslaton’s ourt sold at Kosher Corner in Brooklyn).

Cook for about 1 hour covered.

Add kibbe – simmer uncovered about 1/2 hour- 45 minutes.

Mash the whole potato when soft to add to thicker consistency.

2- Kibbe Homda Recipe by Odette Tebele Rishty:

“Probably the toughest recipe ever …to give exact measurements and directions for. All grandmas give it over like this… Then you put the lemon juice and we say how much sito? And they say ‘just put!’. Then you put the salt and we say how much and they say ‘just put!’ haha. The point is to know exactly what you want it to taste like and a cook who is comfortable in their kitchen and is experienced with food will get it.

This is a Halab recipe. (Alleppo syria) My grandma left there and went to Mexico and married at 16 in Mexico. This recipe’s end result is an orange to red looking Hamud.   Its salty lemony sauce has sugar added but only a drop enough to enhance .. The sweetness is not tasted —I’ve tasted within my own grandmas daughters a slightly sweeter version and my grandmas was even less sweet – my mom’s Adela (Chayo )Tebele. ah’ was in deed the best! This is how I make it and she loved my Hamud!

I don’t have time to give directions-  I think anyone can figure it out if they make Hamud ! All mom’s son in laws and grandchildren loved this Hamud the best! Egyptian son in law included! She’d get visits for leftovers from son in laws and older grandchildren and grandchildren bringing her great grandchildren for another taste even on a Monday for leftovers!

  • Lots Celery
  • Lots Carrots
  • 1 lg onion onion small slithers cook til just clear not more(that is the first thing in the pot with a little oil )
  • Water fill till half of pot (med to large pot)
  • 1 marrow bone this adds tons of flavor
  • 1Can of tomato sauce (small can for med pot , large can for a really big pot)
  • Lemon juice (at least two cups maybe more will be needed as you go along)
  • 2-3 tablespoons of sugar
  • 1 peeled potato cut up in small chunks
  • Crushed garlic 3-4 cloves ,dry mint leaves crushed kosher salt and oil 1-2 tbsp to make paste and add to Hamood soup as cooking
  • Probably will need to add salt a few times.

Taste and add ingredients if needed after a good 15 minute boil. Then add kibbes when ur happy with the taste (so your not meat for the day- If you need to still have coffee & the like :)  )Then allow it to cook for at least 45 min covered slightly ajar .. .Bubbling slightly then lower the flameMy sister variated to this and I honed in on it – and asked her secret -she added a fresh lemon and a fresh lime (either or can be used but i use both including the juicy inside

pieces ) squeezed into the soup — along with the usual store bought lemon juice — it definitely enhances the flavor to be more Middle Eastern as it creates a stronger more delicacy-like robust flavor.
(for a really big Hamud pot I would say not to double the ingredients- a little less than double)
Anyone can email me for questions if anything is unclear or they need help with it.  Itsallagift1@aol.com.
When I was finally able to make Hamud good everytime it was my proudest moment to be able to carry on the tradition!
My mom’s magic is working– to keep a family coming back for visits– now my married daughter makes sure to come back for Hamood and tries to even take some home after shabbat for my granddaughter who just started eating regular food — she loves it too!!!Happy hamud perfecting! May the tradition-carrying force be with you! “
Odette (Tebele )Rishty

 

3-  Kibbe Homda by Lisa Ades:

Sour Spearmint Sauce/Soup with Meatballs (Hamud) by Lisa Ades

  • 5 medium boiling potatoes, peeled and cut in
  • 1 lb ground beef
  • salt
  • 1 1/2-inch pieces
  • 3 stalks celery, diced
  • 1 lb. veal stew meat, cut into 1 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1-2 cups fresh lemon juice
  • 1 head garlic, clves peeled and minced
  • 1/2 cup dried spearmint
  • 1/2 cup sugar

Place ground beef in a large bowl. Season with salt, mix well, then
shape into 1″ meatballs. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside.

Place potatoes, celery, veal, lemon juice, garlic, spearmint, and sugar
in a large pot. Add 8 cups water and bring to a boil over high heat.
Reduce heat to low, add meatballs, cover, and simmer, stirring
occasionally, for 1 hour. Using a long-handled spoon, stir soup,
mashing potatoes just enough to slightly thicken soup. Cover and
continue cooking until veal is tender, about 2 hours more.

Adjust seasoning with additional salt, sugar and lemon juice, if
necessary. Ladle into bowls or serve over rice.

 

4- Jen Ashkenazi- from my grandma’s cookbook:

“Cooking with Grandma” was made by the Children & Grandchildren of Marjorie Ashkenazie A”H.  We were all able to pick our favorite recipe from our Grandmother & write a small story from the memories that brought us back to that recipe . This cookbook is my favorite tool in the kitchen because I know my grandmother is watching over me & guiding me in the correct direction .

“Cooking With Grandma” can be purchased online from the below Link ;

http://www.blurb.com/bookstore/detail/2430715?alt=Cooking+with+Grandma+-+revised+edition%2C+as+listed+under+Cooking

 

5- Kibbe Homda by Sara Ash

  • Water
  • Crushed garlic
  • Lemon juice real lemon
  • Kosher salt
  • Fresh mint
  • Chopped celery carrots potatoes
  • Jerusalem glatt kibbe balls bought from the kosher butcher on East 8 in Brooklyn, NY.
“Kibbe meat is the best if u make your own …
Fill medium size pot 3/4 full w/ water crushed garlic and salt bring to boil . Add 1 bunch of fresh mint chopped ..bring to boil add lemon juice from bottle count to 12 .
Bring to boil add carrots and celery boil for 10 add kibbe balls and potatoes .
Boil until potatoes get soft .. Consistency will be thicker .. Flame should be low …
My families favorite I never make enough!”

 

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