Tag archive for "Mark Bittman"

Lamb Kebobs with Rosemary Skewers

kosher meat recipes, kosher recipes, rosh hashanah roast , lamb, and brisket recipes

Lamb Kebobs with Rosemary Skewers

No Comments 14 September 2013

This dish was a great hit on my Rosh Hashanah table  last year. Its great to throw these on the grill just after the men and kids come home from synagogue Rosh Hashanah or  Sukkot night.

The grilled lamb kebobs threaded with rosemary can be served along side grilled figs.

Don’t over cook them as they get tough and chewy.

Try it!  you will get rave reviews!

Serves 20 people.

Inspired by Mark Bittman.

  • 5 pounds boneless lamb shoulder, cut into chunks
  • 12 fresh figs
  • Rosemary branches
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil, more or less
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • One and 1/4 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 6 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 4 tablespoons minced fresh rosemary.
  1. Marinate lamb chunks with lemon juice, olive oil, salt and pepper,and chopped rosemary.
  2. Start a charcoal or wood fire or heat a gas grill; fire should be moderately hot.
  3. Thread lamb chunks with a wood skewer in order to make a hole for the rosemary to slide in easily.
  4. Make  lamb rosemary skewers – using 3 chunks per rosemary skewer.
  5. Thread several rosemary skewers with 3 figs each, that have also beem marinated in lemon oil marinade. You will find that most of the men and kids will go for the lamb and not the figs- but the figs add an elegance to the dish.
  6. Grill, turning skewers as each side browns; total cooking time should be from 6 to 10 minutes for medium-rare meat, and 4 or 5 minutes for the figs. Meat will become slightly more done after you remove it from grill, so take this into account.

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Asparagus Pesto by Mark Bittman

kosher recipes, kosher rice and pasta recipes, kosher thanksgiving recipes, kosher vegetable recipes, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes

Asparagus Pesto by Mark Bittman

No Comments 09 August 2012











Summer entertaining means pulling out pre-made gourmet extras from the freezer, and pesto is usually one of them. Pesto- (meaning paste) is  a no-brainer for pasta, or is great drizzled on sliced  mozarella cheese.  This recipe for asparagus pesto is a fresh twist on pasta-in-tupperware on the beach,  served on veggies as a side dish for barbeque (omit the cheese if serving meat), and as Mark Bittman suggests, you can even spread it on fish.

This recipe is quick in preparation.

Make and freeze in ice cube trays or flatten in baggies in the freezer.

watch the video Here

adapted from the New York Times


Asparagus Pesto

Published: May 7, 2010

Time: 20 minutes

  • Salt
  • 1 pound asparagus, peeled, trimmed, and cut into 2-inch segments
  • 1 clove garlic, or more to taste
  • 1/4 cup pine nuts
  • 1/4 cup olive oil, or more as desired
  • 3/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Juice of 1/2 lemon, or to taste.

1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and salt it. Add the asparagus and cook until fully tender but not mushy, 8 to 10 minutes. Drain well, reserving some of the cooking liquid, and let the asparagus cool slightly.

2. Transfer the asparagus to a food processor and add the garlic, pine nuts, 2 tablespoons of the oil, Parmesan, a pinch of salt and a couple of tablespoons of the cooking liquid. Process the mixture, stopping to scrape down the sides of the container if necessary, and gradually add the remaining oil and a bit more of the reserved cooking liquid to moisten if necessary. Add the lemon juice and season with salt and pepper to taste, pulse one last time, and serve over pasta, fish or chicken (or cover and refrigerate for up to a day).

Yield: 4 to 6 servings (about 1 1/2 cups).

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Warm Chickpea Salad with Arugula for Passover

kosher pareve recipes, kosher passover recipes,seder table Ideas, kosher recipes, kosher salad recipes, kosher vegetable recipes, mothers day recipes, rosh hashanah pasta, salads, and lunch ideas

Warm Chickpea Salad with Arugula for Passover

No Comments 15 January 2012

Many Sepahrdic Jews eat chick peas on Passover, and I am lucky to be one of them. If you do buy chick peas in a can for Passover, make sure it is Kosher certified for Passover.

If you are of  Ashkenaz descent, then start using up your chametz chickpeas by trying this savory recipe ASAP!

To read more about  kitniyot on Passover, click HERE.

This recipe is too good to pass up.  It took 10 minutes to prepare, and took another 10 minutes for the family to devour it. Use more olive oil, salt, pepper,vinegar  and honey if you have  a lot of arugula. Serve as a weeknight tasty side dish, or as a midday main course with friends.

Check out this REVIEW of this great Mark Bittman cook book.

From : How to Cook Everything, Completely Revised 10th Anniversary Edition: 2,000 Simple Recipes for Great Food

Makes: 4 side- or 2 main-dish servings

Time: 20 minutes with precooked beans

  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon minced peeled fresh ginger
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 1/2 cups cooked or drained canned chickpeas
  • 1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • 4 cups arugula leaves
  • 1 small red onion, halved and thinly sliced
  • 4 hard-cooked eggs, quartered (optional)

Kosher Sephardic Passover Recipe Directions

1. Put the olive oil in a deep skillet over medium heat. When hot, add the ginger, garlic, and cumin and cook, stirring constantly, until fragrant and the ginger and garlic are soft, 1 to 2 minutes. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, then stir in the chickpeas until hot and coated in the oil and seasonings, about 3 minutes more.

2. Remove from heat and with a fork, stir in the vinegar, honey, and 1 tablespoon water. Mash a few of the chickpeas as you stir to add texture to the dressing. Put the arugula and red onion in a large bowl and toss with the warm chickpea dressing. Taste and adjust the seasoning. Serve immediately, garnished with hard-cooked eggs if you like.
Recipe from Mark Bittman‘s BLOG.

More books from Mark Bittman


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Delete the Flour in Your Pantry- Sweet Potato or Coconut Muffins

kosher dessert recipes, kosher recipes

Delete the Flour in Your Pantry- Sweet Potato or Coconut Muffins

1 Comment 27 March 2011

Kosher Recipes

Sprinkled with Coconut

Chocolate Chunk

Nothing is more satisfying than an empty crumpled bag of whole wheat flour sitting on my kitchen counter. Especially a month before Passover.


So when I saw Mark Bittman’s   “Whole Wheat Muffin, The Remix” recipe in the New York Times, I decided it was worth a try.

The only problem was, it called for “preferably whole wheat pastry flour”, and I only had a bag of regular  whole wheat flour. I also decided to see if anyone would notice if I substituted agave nectar for sugar.

I ran out and bought buttermilk, (you can also make your own easy buttermilk HERE) and on Sunday morning the muffins were mixed, baked, and out of the oven within the hour. Cleanup was a cinch. I made a double batch. The first bunch was filled with a baked and mashed sweet potato. I topped those with leftover shredded coconut from my freezer. The second batch was mixed with 3 really ripe bananas that would have otherwise gone in the garbage.  I topped them with chocolate chunks just to make sure that they didnt look too healthy.

Well, I left them all in a plate, and ran out to exercise.

Conclusion: The all time  favorite was the banana chocolate. Not such a hit was the sweet potato topped with coconut.

They never even guessed that agave nectar was the sweet culprit.

This is a really great  grab- and- go breakfast item for the older members of the family. I have a feeling that kids under eighth grade wouldnt go for it so early in the morning but its worth a try. This is also not a recipe for a sugar lover like my sister-in-law who would rather have a Snickers for breakfast. Give it a try!

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Mark Bittman’s Chicken with Coconut and Lime

kosher chicken recipes, kosher recipes, purim recipes, baskets, and decor

Mark Bittman’s Chicken with Coconut and Lime

No Comments 01 March 2011

By Lucy Cohen Blatter

I have a confession to make: I’m not crazy about chicken breasts. Okay, I realize this isn’t a major revelation, but for a cook/blogger who’s trying to stay healthy, it’s a bit of a challenge. Sure, I love breaded and fried chicken schnitzels — who doesn’t? But I much prefer dark meat, and often find skinless, boneless chicken breast recipes to be dry and boring.

That said, I have a lot of faith in Mark Bittman . The former author of the Minimalist column for The New York Times (and current op-ed writer) is all about simplicity. Like me, he often embraces substitutions, too.

And his recipe for Chicken with Coconut and Lime does not disappoint.

The recipe includes an optional addition of nam pla, or fish sauce. To keep this recipe strictly kosher, I omitted that. To up the healthiness of the dish I went with light coconut milk (canned, of course :)).

As an added plus, if your are looking for some new kosher recipes for your Purim Seuda, then this one is a great choice as a main dish!

You’ll see in the recipe below how I changed things up a bit (I discovered I was out of cayenne pepper right before I started cooking). Next time I might sprinkle some peanuts on top to add a little bit of crunch.

All in all, it was a great dish. Served with coconut rice (made with leftover coconut milk and water), and steamed broccoli, I felt transported to Thailand. And that’s a good thing.

This recipe had seven ingredients including salt. That’s my kind of dish.

The coconut milk, lime zest and salt just kinda hang out on the stove for a while.

Bittman advises against flipping the chicken breasts over in the broiler. The tip must have worked because the chicken was moist, but brown and crispy on top.

Pouring the creamy sauce on the chicken. YUM!

The final product. Paired with coconut rice and broccoli, it was perfect.

Mark Bittman‘s Broiled or Grilled Chicken with Coconut and Lime* (with Lucy’s edits)

Time: 20 minutes (I’d say it’s more like 25-30 minutes when you take into account reading along with the recipe)

  • 2 limes
  • 1 to 1 1/2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts in 4 pieces
  • 1/2 cup canned or fresh coconut milk (I went with canned because on weeknights I’m looking for time savers)
  • Salt and ground cayenne pepper (I didn’t have any ground cayenne, so I substituted red pepper flakes. Totally  fine.)
  • 1 teaspoon nam pla, fish sauce (optional) (It’s difficult to find kosher fish sauce, and if you’re making chicken, forget about it. If you substitute fish for the chicken, though, and decide to use fish sauce, I’d hold off on adding salt. Nam pla is very salty)
  • 4 minced scallions
  • 1/4 cup minced cilantro.

1. Remove the zest from the limes, with either a zester or a vegetable peeler (if you use a peeler, scrape off the white inside of the zest with a paring knife). Mince the zest, and juice the limes. Marinate chicken in half the lime juice while heating broiler; adjust rack to about 4 inches from heat source. (Or grill the chicken if you prefer.)

2. Warm the coconut milk over low heat; season it with salt (hold off on this if you are using nam pla) and a pinch of cayenne. Add the lime zest.

3. Put chicken, smooth side up, on ungreased baking sheet lined with foil, and place the sheet in broiler. Add about half the remaining lime juice to coconut milk mixture.

4. When the chicken is nicely browned on top, in about 6 minutes more, it is done (if you want to be sure, make a small cut in the thickest part and peek inside). Transfer chicken to a warm platter. Add the nam pla, if you are using it, to the coconut milk; taste, and adjust seasoning as necessary. Spoon a little of the sauce over and around the breasts; then, garnish with the scallions and cilantro, and sprinkle with the remaining lime juice. Serve with white rice, passing the remaining sauce.

Yield: 4 servings

*Recipe from the New York Times

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Joy’s Amazing No Knead Olive Bread

kosher bread recipes, kosher pareve recipes, kosher recipes

Joy’s Amazing No Knead Olive Bread

3 Comments 06 January 2011

Thank you Joy!! This looks like a great recipe for busy women!! (that means all of us!!!) No need to complete it all in one shot….. mix and let rise…. cover and let rise….

“Hi Marlene,

I thought the readers of The Jewish Hostess might enjoy this No Knead Bread Recipe from The Sullivan Street Bakery. Since I have discovered this recipe I have made it many times with different variations, wholewheat, semolina, olives, & roasted garlic with rosemary. It is delicious rustic bread crusty on the outside and chewy and soft with tunnels on the inside…..so easy my 12 year old grandson made it!  The trick is to let the dough rest for 12-18 hours….the longer it rests the more complex the flavors get…Jim Lahey of the Sullivan Street Bakery developed this formula: “- Joy Betesh

Items Needed for this Kosher Recipe

  • 3 cups (430g) flour
  • 1½ cups (345g or 12oz) water
  • ¼ teaspoon (1g) yeast
  • 1¼ teaspoon (8g) salt
  • olive oil (for coating)
  • extra flour, wheat bran, or cornmeal (for dusting)
  • Two medium mixing bowls
  • 6 to 8 quart pot with lid (Pyrex glass, Le Creuset cast iron, or ceramic)
  • Wooden Spoon or spatula (optional)
  • Plastic wrap
  • Two or three cotton dish towels (not terrycloth)

Directions for this Kosher Recipe

Mix all of the dry ingredients in a medium bowl. Add water and incorporate by hand or with a wooden spoon or spatula for 30 seconds to 1 minute. Lightly coat the inside of a second medium bowl with olive oil and place the dough in the bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let the dough rest 12 hours at room temperature (approx. 65-72°F).

Remove the dough from the bowl and fold once or twice. Let the dough rest 15 minutes in the bowl or on the work surface. Next, shape the dough into ball. Generously coat a cotton towel with flour, wheat bran, or cornmeal; place the dough seam side down on the towel and dust with flour. Cover the dough with a cotton towel and let rise 1-2 hours at room temperature, until more than doubled in size.

Preheat oven to 450-500°F. Place the pot in the oven at least 30 minutes prior to baking to preheat. Once the dough has more than doubled in volume, remove the pot from the oven and place the dough in the pot seam side up. Cover with the lid and bake 30 minutes Then remove the lid and bake 15-30 minutes uncovered, until the loaf is nicely browned.

For the whole wheat version, I substituted 2 cups of whole wheat flour for the white flour

For the semolina, I substituted 1 cup of semolina flour (smead) for 1 cup of white flour

For the olive bread, I added 1/2 cup pitted & chopped Alphonso or kalamata olives to the dough mixture just before I let it rise in the towel.

For the garlic & rosemary bread, I sauteed 4 garlic cloves cut in slivers in a teaspoon of olive oil and then mixed the garlic pieces (without the oil) with 2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary and added to the dough mixture just before it rises in the towel

Mark Bittman, of the NY Times has a You Tube video on making this bread.

Click above to watch it!

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Shabbat Roasted Chicken-Six Ways

kosher chicken recipes, kosher meat recipes, kosher passover recipes,seder table Ideas, kosher recipes, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes

Shabbat Roasted Chicken-Six Ways

No Comments 01 September 2010

We dug up these recipes from our archives- perfect for the holidays…..

These unbelievable roasted chicken recipes are from  Mark Bittman’s blog ….Of course I recommend using organic kosher chicken.

All of these recipes are perfect for Shabbat and can be modified for the  Passover Seder.

PLEASE let me know if your family likes these new dishes!

Which one is your favorite?

Simplest Whole Roast Chicken, Six Ways:
Makes 4 servings
Time: About 1 hour
This method works because the high heat provided by the heated skillet cooks the thighs faster than the breasts, which are exposed only to the heat of the oven. It gives you nice browning without drying out the breast meat, and it’s easily varied. If at any point during the cooking the pan juices begin to smoke, just add a little water or wine (white or red, your choice) to the pan. This will reduce browning, however, so don’t do it unless you must. I suggest serving the pan juices with the chicken (you can call it sauce naturel if you like).
1 whole chicken, 3 to 4 pounds, trimmed of excess fat
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
A few sprigs fresh tarragon, rosemary, or thyme (optional)
5 or 6 cloves garlic, peeled (optional)
Chopped fresh herbs for garnish

Directions for Creating this Kosher Recipe
1. Heat the oven to 450°F. Five minutes after turning on the oven, put a cast-iron or other heavy ovenproof skillet on a rack set low in the oven. Rub the chicken with the olive oil, sprinkle it with salt and pepper, and put the herb sprigs on it if you’re using them.
2. When both oven and pan are hot, 10 or 15 minutes later, carefully put the chicken, breast side up, in the hot skillet; if you’re using garlic, scatter it around the bird. Roast, undisturbed, for 40 to 50 minutes or until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the meaty part of the thigh registers 155–165°F. 3. Tip the pan to let the juices from the bird’s cavity flow into the pan (if they are red, cook for another 5 minutes). Transfer the bird to a platter and let it rest; if you like, pour the pan juices into a clear measuring cup, then pour or spoon off some of the fat. Reheat the juices if necessary, quarter the bird (see the illustrations on page 685), garnish, and serve with the pan juices.
Herb-Roasted Chicken:
A little more elegant: Start the cooking without the olive oil. About halfway through, spoon a mixture of 1/4 cup olive oil and 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley, chervil, basil, or dill over the chicken. Garnish with more chopped herbs.
Lemon-Roasted Chicken.
Brush the chicken with olive oil before roasting; cut a lemon in half and put it in the chicken’s cavity. Roast, more or less undisturbed, until done; squeeze the juice from the cooked lemon over the chicken and carve.
Roast Chicken with Paprika:
With good paprika, quite delicious: Combine the olive oil with about 1 tablespoon sweet paprika or smoked pimentón. Roast Chicken with Soy Sauce(for Passover, use soy sauce substitute). Chinese-style roast chicken, made easy: Replace the olive oil with peanut or neutral oil, like grapeseed or corn. Halfway through the cooking, spoon or brush over the chicken a mixture of 1/4 cup soy sauce( for Passover, use a soy sauce substitute), 2 tablespoons honey, 1 teaspoon minced garlic, 1 teaspoon grated or minced fresh ginger (or 1 teaspoon ground ginger), and 1/4 cup minced scallion.
Roast Chicken with Cumin, Honey, and Orange Juice.
Sweet and exotic: Halfway through the cooking, spoon or brush over the chicken a mixture of 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed orange juice, 2 tablespoons honey, 1 teaspoon minced garlic, 2 teaspoons ground cumin, and salt and pepper to taste.
5 More Ways to Flavor Simplest Whole Roast Chicken:
There are many ways to flavor a roast chicken; here are some simple ideas to get you started:
1. Lemon: Use 3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice in addition to or in place of olive oil.
2. Lime: Use 3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice in a soy sauce mix (as in the Roast Chicken with Soy Sauce variation) or with some minced jalapeño or serrano chiles or hot red pepper flakes, chopped fresh cilantro leaves to taste, and a tablespoon or two of peanut oil (use Passover substitutes).
3. Honey-Mustard: Combine 2 tablespoons to 1/3 cup mustard with 2 tablespoons honey and rub the chicken with this mixture during the final stages of roasting.(use mustard substitute for Passover cooking).
4. Wine: Put 1/2 cup white wine and 2 cloves crushed garlic in the bottom of the roasting pan; baste with this in addition to or in place of the olive oil mixture.
5. Curry: In place of the olive oil, use neutral oil, like grapeseed or corn-or butter. Combine 1/2 cup coconut milk and 2 tablespoons curry powder and baste the chicken with this mixture during the final stages of roasting.(please use caution with recipe #5 for kosher Passover ingredients).


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22 Summer Fast and Kosher Grilling Recipes by Mark Bittman

kosher fish recipes, kosher meat recipes, kosher recipes, kosher vegetable recipes

22 Summer Fast and Kosher Grilling Recipes by Mark Bittman

1 Comment 08 July 2010

Recently, Mark Bittman featured a great article featuring 101 Fast Grilling Recipes.
We’ve edited out the un-kosher ingredients and pared it down to the top 22 summer grilling ideas for all of our kosher cooks!
Which ones are your favorites?  Comment below and let us all know!
1. A winter dish, summer style: Brush thick slices of fennel bulbs with olive oil and grill over not-too-high heat. Cut oranges in half and grill, cut-side down. Put fennel on a bed of arugula or watercress, squeeze grilled oranges over top. Garnish with fennel fronds.
2. Best grilled artichokes: Cut artichokes in half, scoop out the choke, parboil until tender. Grill, cut-side down, until lightly browned; grill a couple of halved lemons, too. Combine the juice from the grilled lemons with melted butter, or margarine, or Earth Balance, and spoon over the artichokes. Finish with parsley.
3. Tahini tofu steaks. Thin tahini with lots of lemon juice and some minced garlic. Cut a brick of firm tofu into four slabs and brush with sesame oil. Grill over a moderate fire, turning a few times, until marked and crisp outside and custardy inside. On the last turn, baste with the tahini sauce. Serve on thick tomato slices with a drizzle of soy sauce and chopped basil, Thai if possible.
4. Spice-rubbed carrots: Roll peeled carrots in cumin, salt, pepper and brown sugar. Char, then move them away from direct heat and cover the grill until carrots are tender.
5. Grill bread; grind in a food processor to make coarse bread crumbs. (You can add garlic and/or parsley and/or Parmesan, or not.) Grill asparagus until tender. Top with bread crumbs and olive oil.
6. Brush slices of beet with olive oil and grill slowly until tender and lightly browned. Top each slice with a little goatcheese and some salad greens.
7. For perfectly ripe tomatoes only: Grill tomatoes, any size, until hot and lightly charred but not bursting. Drizzle with olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and serve with fresh mozzarella (or, even better, burrata) and grilled bread.
8. Halve and grill radicchio (or Belgian endives); drizzle cut sides with honey or plain vinaigrette, pesto or parsley pesto. Or just brush with oil .
9. Grilled guacamole: Halve and pit avocados; lightly char them, then scoop out the flesh. Grill halved red onion, too. Chop, combine, add tomatoes, lime, garlic and spices if you like
10. Root vegetable of your choice: Slice celeriac — or jicama, big potatoes, daikon or yams — and grill slowly, until very tender and browned. Drizzle with olive oil or melted butter and sprinkle with chopped rosemary or sage and olive oil.

11. Choose another root. Slice it, but this time char lightly and leave it crunchy. Chop and toss with chopped cilantro, a pinch of cayenne and juice of grilled lime.
12. Rub thick zucchini slices with a mixture of fresh or dried dill, yogurt, olive oil and lemon. (Or use pesto or parsley pesto.) Grill slowly.
13. More shopping than cooking: Grill an array of radishes on little skewers, four to six each. Serve with butter, salt and bread.
14. Halve Belgian endives. Brush with olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper and grill over moderate-to-low heat, turning once or twice, until soft and browned. Finish cut-side up and sprinkle with grated Parmesan; close the grill to melt cheese.
15. Lightly char whole or halved heads of baby bok choy; drizzle with soy sauce and top with chopped scallions.
16. Peel and thickly slice a not overly ripe mango. Brush very lightly with neutral oil and grill just until softened; sprinkle with cilantro and/or mint and lime juice (you might as well grill the lime first, too).
17. Grill pineapple (or anything, really, from tofu to eggplant). Make a sauce of half-cup peanut butter, a tablespoon (or more) soy sauce, a dash (or more) sriracha chili sauce, a handful of basil or mint and enough warm water to thin. (I’m tempted to say, “Throw away the pineapple and eat the sauce,” but the combination is sensational.)
18. An idea whose time has come: Halve and grill peaches, nectarines or apricots. Brush with barbecue sauce or, if you want to be sophisticated, a mixture of bourbon, sugar and mint, or simple syrup laced with basil.
19. An idea whose time will come in September: Halve and grill pears or apples. When they’re done, drizzle with yogurt, honey and a pinch of cardamom.
20. Grilled fruit salad, and why not? Toss grilled watermelon (really good), peaches, plums, pineapple and kiwi with honey, a little salt, lemon juice and tarragon (not much), chervil, basil or mint (or a combo).
21. Cut grapefruit in half. Sprinkle with brown sugar; grill, cut-side down. You might top this with chopped pistachios or a little honey.
22. Grilled poundcake (store-bought is totally fine) topped with grilled fruit sauce, strawberries in sugar, yogurt, ice cream, whatever.

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Easy Gourmet Stuffed Chicken Cutlets-Video

kosher chicken recipes, kosher meat recipes, kosher recipes

Easy Gourmet Stuffed Chicken Cutlets-Video

1 Comment 27 April 2010

By Mark Bittman

This kosher recipe is elegant enough for a kosher dinner party and  gourmet enough to show your family that they are worth it on weeknight!

No one will guess how easy it really is to pull off a kosher recipe for “Gourmet Stuffed Kosher Chicken Cutlets“, by Mark Bittman, (New York Times)!

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Make Your Own Greek Yogurt-Video

kosher dairy recipes, kosher recipes

Make Your Own Greek Yogurt-Video

2 Comments 01 April 2010

Mark Bittman has done it again.

This DIY greek yogurt is yummy with the Syrian spice zaatar, olive oil, lemon, and salt sprinkled in.

Serve with Matzoh crackers  (or pita chips after  Passover), of course with a dairy lunch.  Spending many summers by my in-laws home in New Jersey, I can still see the blob of yogurt  inside the tied handkerchief  that was dangling over the sink. Its always considered a delicacy for the family, and my mother-in-law still drops off a batch of home-made yogurt every so often. The time has come for me to start making it myself!!  Watch the video and PLEASE send in pictures if you decide to make it yourself!!

Reprint from the New York Times

THE so-called Greek yogurt that has become popular in recent years is neither a special kind of yogurt nor uniquely Greek. It’s simply yogurt from which much of the water has been removed, a concoction that in its thickest form can be called yogurt cheese. You can find yogurt cheese in every country that has a history of yogurt making. In addition to being thicker and richer when eaten straight, it makes superior spreads and dips.It can be made at home from ordinary yogurt, and its consistency can be varied: it can be similar to sour cream, crème fraîche, or mayonnaise, for which it’s a good substitute, or it can be thick enough to cut with a knife.

Producing yogurt cheese is quite simple. It takes a couple of hours, but your presence is required only for minutes. All you do is strain some of the water out of yogurt, until it reaches the thickness you want. For straining, I recommend a colander or coarse strainer lined with a clean cotton dish towel of fairly fine weave, what used to be called flour sack. (Many recipes suggest the use of cheesecloth, but you’d have to use about 10 layers for the same results.) Dump a quart (or whatever quantity you like) of yogurt in there, set the colander over a bowl in the refrigerator, twist or tie the top of the towel, and wait.

To speed the process, squeeze every now and then, or don’t bother. When the yogurt has reached the consistency of sour cream, twist and squeeze once more and scoop out the yogurt, which will have been reduced in volume by about half. (I suppose you could save and drink the yogurt-water, or cook with it, but I don’t.) Store the thickened yogurt in a covered container and use it within a week or so for best quality.

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Chicken with Roasted Fennel by Mark Bittman of the NYT

kosher chicken recipes, kosher meat recipes, kosher recipes

Chicken with Roasted Fennel by Mark Bittman of the NYT

No Comments 25 March 2010

I love Mark Bittmans recipes. When I saw this chicken and fennel recipe featured in his column, I knew it would be a perfect for the holiday , since all of the ingredients are easy to find, and kosher for Passover. Its also doesn’t require too many complicated steps, which is exacty what we DONT need on Passover . Roasted fennel is also one of my favorites. I can’t wait to try it.

reprint from the New York Times :

Roast Chicken With Fennel

Yield 4 servings

Time 40 minutes
Given chicken‘s tendency to become dry during cooking, I’d suggest one of two options: Use all drumsticks and thighs; these will flavor the fennel brilliantly, remain moist even if you overcook them slightly, and give you the crunchiest skin. (If you separate drumstick from thigh at the joint, a simple cut, you’ll also reduce cooking time by about 10 minutes.) Or cut up a whole chicken. If you do this, cut apart the drumsticks and thighs so they cook almost as quickly as the breast pieces. Even then, you may want to remove the breasts early to keep them from drying out.

Ingredients for this Kosher Recipe
  • 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil, or as needed
  • 2 bulbs fennel, trimmed and cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 whole (about 3-pound) chicken, cut up, or about 3 pounds drumsticks and thighs
  • Chopped fresh parsley leaves for garnish
  • Lemon wedges
Directions for this Kosher Recipe
  • 1. Heat oven to 450 degrees. Drizzle bottom of shallow roasting pan or baking sheet with about half the olive oil and cover it with a layer of the fennel. Overlap pieces if necessary but use whole pan. Drizzle remaining oil over fennel and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast about 10 minutes. Meanwhile, cut up chicken if necessary and sprinkle the pieces with salt and pepper.
  • 2. Top fennel with the chicken parts, skin side up. Ideally, you’ll have a layer of fennel pretty much covered by a layer of chicken, but it’s fine if some of the fennel roasts uncovered. Spoon some of the oil from bottom of pan over chicken. Roast about 15 minutes, then baste chicken with pan drippings and rotate the pan. If necessary, adjust oven temperature so chicken browns but does not burn.
  • 3. The chicken will be done in about 30 minutes. Serve each piece with some fennel and a little of the pan juices spooned over, garnished with parsley and a lemon wedge.
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