Tag archive for "Middle East"

Thanksgiving Bulgur Pilaf with Butternut Squash, Chestnuts, and Cinnamon by Jennifer Abadi

kosher recipes, kosher thanksgiving recipes, kosher vegetable recipes, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes, rosh hashanah vegetables, shavuot recipes and ideas

Thanksgiving Bulgur Pilaf with Butternut Squash, Chestnuts, and Cinnamon by Jennifer Abadi

No Comments 26 November 2013

Thank you Jennifer Abadi for this fabulous savory bulgur pilaf- perfect for a Thanksgiving menu!

Check out Jennifer’s website www.FistfulofLentils.com.

Bulgur is a healthy ingredient common in foods from Turkey, the Mediterranean and the Middle East. I was really surprised to find out how healthy bulgur really is!

Some of the benefits of eating bulgur include:

  • Lowering the risk of Type 2 diabetes because it contains Magnesium which helps out the insulin in your body.
  • Bulgur’s high fiber content helps against breast cancer.
  • Fiber in bulgur helps protect against gallstones (trust me- gallstones are not a fun thing to have)
  • Bulgur contains an ingredient called Betaine which helps protect against creaky joints and inflammation that some of us may be starting to feel…..
  • Bulgur contains Folate which  helps with mental clarity and memory!!! Now, who wouldn’t want a couple extra crystal clear brain cells that can help us find our keys when we are running out that door….

 

Enjoy this  hearty and healthy new kosher recipe!

Thanksgiving Bulgur Pilaf with Butternut Squash, Chestnuts, and Cinnamon

(Yield: Serves 4 to 6 / Makes about 5 cups)
Preparation Time: 1 Hour 15 Minutes
Ingredients:
For Pilaf:
  • 2 cups whole grain bulgur wheat (ground bulgur will become too mushy)
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil or salted butter
  • 1 cup coarsely chopped yellow onions
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 3/4 cup vegetable or chicken stock
  • 1/2 cup ¼-inch cubed butternut squash pieces (cut to about the size of the chickpeas)
  • ¼ cup pre-cooked chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • ¼ cup sliced chestnuts (pre-roasted and packaged in a jar or can)
For Serving:
  • 1 tablespoon fresh dill, finely chopped
  • 2 teaspoons melted salted margarine or salted butter (optional)
Recipe Procedure:
1. Pour bulgur into a medium sized bowl and cover with cold water. Soak for 30 minutes to 1 hour, then drain. (May also be soaked, drained, and stored in a tight-sealed container in the refrigerator overnight).
2. Heat the oil (or butter) in a heavy large pot for 30 seconds over medium heat. Cook the onions until golden and soft, but not brown, 4 to 5 minutes.
3. Add the garlic and stir. Continue to cook until the onions are brown, about another 10 minutes (be careful not to burn the garlic).
4. Stir in the salt, cinnamon, and allspice, and cook for a minute.
5. Add the drained bulgur and mix well. Gently sauté the grains, mixing constantly over medium heat, about 10 minutes.
6. Add the broth, butternut squash pieces, chickpeas, and chestnut pieces and mix well. Reduce the heat to the lowest setting, cover tightly, and cook just until the butternut squash is soft and bulgur is tender (the grains should have a slightly chewy bite to them), 25 to 30 minutes. (Mix the bulgur wheat every 10 minutes or so, mixing well to ensure that the bottom is not burning and sticking to the pot.)
7. Just before serving, taste and add more salt, if necessary. Serve warm in a glass or ceramic bowl sprinkled with the chopped dill, and melted butter (if desired). Toss at the table, just before serving.
 www.FistfulofLentils.com
©Jennifer Abadi / www.FistfulofLentils.com

 

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Yom Ha’atzmaut Special! Barbara Streisand Sings Hatikvah to Golda Meir – 1978 Video

kosher recipes

Yom Ha’atzmaut Special! Barbara Streisand Sings Hatikvah to Golda Meir – 1978 Video

No Comments 15 April 2013

Screenshot of Barbra Streisand from the traile...
Image via Wikipedia

 

I have decided to celebrate Israel’s 65th birthday by presenting to you, our readers, two great Jewish women who have succeeded in life, way beyond the expected. I may be revealing my age, but I’d rather watch Barbara Streisand sing any day rather than  even look at Taylor Swift!

Do you agree? Comment Below!

1-Barabara Joan Streisand was born on April 24, 1942, in Brooklyn, New York. She is an actress, director, producer and writer. . She has won many awards including two Oscars, five Emmys, eight Golden Globes, three People’s Choice Awards, two Women in Film Crystal Awards and two ASCAP Film and Television Music Awards. Barbra has also received an American Film Institute award and a Cecil B. DeMille Award. She has also supported autism awareness, and On April 16th, 2008, Barbra Streisand endowed $5 million to Cedars-Sinai for the creation of The Barbra Streisand Women’s Cardiovascular Research and Education Program.

Inspiring Quote:

“I arrived in Hollywood without having my nose fixed, my teeth capped, or my name changed. That is very gratifying to me.”

2-Golda Meir was born the daughter of Moshe and Bluma Mabovitch in Kiev, Ukraine, on May 3, 1898. She moved with her family to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1906. The Mabovitch family had fled their home in part to escape pogroms (mob attacks) that had been carried out against Jews in Russia at the time. Meir later recalled that her childhood terror of anti-Semitic (anti-Jewish) violence strongly influenced her later commitment to establish Israel as a safe, secure Jewish state.

In 1956, Israeli prime minister David Ben-Gurion (1886–1976) called Meir “the best man” in his cabinet and named her to replace Shertok-Sharett as foreign minister, among the most important government jobs in the nation. It was now, as a result of Ben-Gurion’s desire to have all Israelis bear Hebrew names, that she reluctantly altered her name to Meir, while keeping it as close as possible to Myerson.

Golda Meir served as Israel’s foreign minister from 1956 to 1966 and became its fourth prime minister in 1969.

Even in retirement, Meir remained an important political presence in Israel. Her autobiography, My Life, helped assure her place in the public’s imagination as the kindly grandmother who had risen to greatness in her nation’s hour of need. Meir died in Jerusalem on December 8, 1978.

Inspiring Quotes:

“Not being beautiful was the true blessing. Not being beautiful forced me to develop my inner resources. The pretty girl has a handicap to overcome.”

“To be successful, a woman has to be much better at her job than a man.”

“Trust yourself. Create the kind of self that you will be happy to live with all your life. Make the most of yourself by fanning the tiny, inner sparks of possibility into flames of achievement.”

“We Jews have a secret weapon in our struggle with the Arabs; we have no place to go.”

Read more: Golda Meir Biography – life, family, childhood, children, parents, name, story, death, school, information, born, college, husband, house, time, year, sister http://www.notablebiographies.com/Ma-Mo/Meir-Golda.html#ixzz0lVvUjzNB

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Spiced Israeli Stuffed Peppers

kosher pareve recipes, kosher recipes, kosher rice and pasta recipes, kosher vegetable recipes, purim recipes, baskets, and decor

Spiced Israeli Stuffed Peppers

2 Comments 14 February 2012

 

Meet Margo Sugarman- one of my favorite Jewish Hostess bloggers residing in the beautiful land of Israel! We are so lucky to be able to get a glimpse of life as a Jewish wife and mom as she cooks and writes about the wonderful herbs, spices, local fruits and vegetables of  the flavorful Israeli cuisine. Check out The Kosher Blogger  for more great kosher recipes for all of the Jewish Holidays, Shabbat, and week nights!

“Stuffed vegetables are prevalent in many Middle Eastern and European countries, each with their own twist and their own flavor profiles. The Greek “gemista” stuffed veggies will use pine nuts, cinnamon and mint; Italian “verdure ripieni” include Parmesan cheese and bread crumbs; “filfil rumi mahsi”, Egyptian stuffed peppers, use allspice, currants and tumeric; Balakan stuffed peppers (names vary by country, but are called “punjena paprika” in Serbia, Bosnia and Montenegro) are characterized by their use of paprika; and Ashkenazi stuffed cabbage, naturally, has a sweet sauce.

My favorite are Israeli stuffed vegetables. I think that the version we make in my house (my husband is the stuffed vegetables master) is a combination of the best of all the recipes, with all the exciting and palate tickling flavors that define Israeli cuisine. The addition of hot paprika, cumin, chili and coriander give this recipe its distinctive Israeli character.

Israeli Stuffed Peppers

Admittedly, making stuffed vegetables is a bit of a project, but the results are mouthwatering. The combination of meat, vegetables and rice all in one dish also means that once you’ve made this, you don’t need a whole lot more to round out a full meal, so it may take some time, but it really is a meal in a pot.

The Israeli version doesn’t discriminate when it comes to the vegetables. Any vegetable that can be scooped out or can wrap around the filling can be used in this dish. Wegenerally use peppers, zucchini and onions, but you can also use tomatoes, cabbage, eggplant, or any other vegetable that can be stuffed. This recipe can also be made as vegetarian by simple omitting the meat. It’s just as delicious without it and is a great vegetarian main course.” Margo Sugarman

ISRAELI STUFFED VEGETABLES

Ingredients

Vegetables to stuff: About 6 red peppers; 4 thick zucchinis halved; 1 large onion. (Quantities will vary depending on the size of the veggies)

Vegetables to stuff

½ kg (1lb) minced beef

1 cup raw long grained rice (Basmati is best)

3 tablespoons olive oil

2 large onions finely chopped

4-6 cloves of garlic crushed

100 g (4 oz) tomato paste

1 grated carrot

½ small chili chopped

¼ teaspoon turmeric

½ teaspoon cumin

½ teaspoon sweet paprika

¼ hot paprika

Salt and pepper

4 tablespoons chopped fresh coriander

2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

½ cup chicken stock

For tomato broth

1 800g (28 oz) can chopped tomatoes

200 g (8 oz) tomato paste

About 4 cups of chicken stock (or as much as required to cover the vegetables once they’re in the pot)

¼ teaspoon cumin

¼ teaspoon sweet paprika

2 cloves of garlic crushed

Remove the tops of the peppers, seeds and white bits

1 teaspoon sugar

Salt and pepper

How to do it

1. Prepare the vegetables: For the peppers, slice around the top of the pepper, near the stem and remove the “lid”, setting aside. Remove the seeds and pulp. For the zucchini, from the cut side, using a very small teaspoon or an apple corer, remove the seeds making sure you don’t pierce the bottom. For the onion, place the peeled onion in a pot of boiling water and cook for about 5 minutes. Then make a cut from the top to the bottom of the onion and carefully remove as many of the large outer layers of the onion as you can and set aside.

Remove seeds from the zucchini

2. In a large wok or skillet, heat up the olive oil. Saute the chopped onion until soft. Add the garlic and saute for less than a minute, making sure it doesn’t burn. Add the mince and cook until there is no longer any pink meat. (For vegetarian, omit the meat) Add the 100g tomato paste and mix. Add the rest of the herbs and spices and saute for another few minutes until it’s all releasing lots of wonderful aromas. Add the stock and mix.

3. Remove from the heat and add the rice, mixing well till combined. Add some of this mixture to each vegetable – fill to no higher than 1 cm from the top of the vegetable and fill it loosely as the rice will expand when cooking. For the onion, place one or two sheets of onion on a clean surface and put about 1 tablespoon of filling in the middle and loosely wrap the onion around the filling so that there is a double layer of onion around the filling. You can do the same for cabbage leaves that you have also boiled in water for a few minutes.

Loosely add filling no higher than 1 cm from the top

4. Place the peppers bottom side down in a large, wide pot, and place the “lids” of the peppers back on top (this is just for show). Add the rest of the vegetables in the spaces, making sure the openings are facing upward.

5. Mix together the ingredients for the tomato broth and pour over the vegetables, making sure the liquid covers all the vegetables. This is essential to ensure that all the rice cooks.

6. Cover the pot. Bring to a boil and reduce the heat. Simmer for 30-40 minutes or until the rice begins to overflow from the peppers and the vegetables are all cooked.

Serves about 6-8.

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Purim Table Decor That’s Fit For a King

purim recipes, baskets, and decor, purim table settings

Purim Table Decor That’s Fit For a King

6 Comments 20 November 2011

This Purim create a table setting that’s fit for a king… King Ahashverosh- Maybe?

I know the original Purim feast took place in Persia, but I imbibed this table setting with Middle Eastern flair from around the region including elements from India to Morocco.

They key to this super saturated and princely look is textures like bone in lay and pressed tin, with layers of handmade textiles and mixing colors with names that make your mouth water!

Happy Purim Everyone!


1. Ikat Placemats $45

2. Gold Banded Glass $48

3. Capiz Placemat $88

4. Tangerine Banded China

5. Colorful Glasses

6. Gold Bowls $26 – $365

7. Floor Cushions $45 – $65

1. $485

2. Peacock Mirror

3. $340

4. Round Lantern $450

5. Fountain $500

6. Hammered Metal Pitcher $29

7. Footed Bowl $29

8. Perforated Metal Hurricanes $29-$59

9. Hammered Metal Stool $775

1. Blue Tray $199

2. Striped Box $199

3. Horn Calligraphy Brushes $89

4. Bone Inlay Chair

5. Horn Cups $18-$22

6. Syrian Side Table $1490

7. Medina Boxes $82-$98

8. Horn Carving Set $379

9. Mother of Pearl Cheese set $26/ea

10. Lavender Tray $199

11. Horn Tiered Server $150

1. Pillows $45 – $65

2. William Yeoward Pink China

3. Pink Glasses

4. Rug $325

5. Fuchsia Pouf $270

6. Colored Glasses $22

7. Peacock Placemat $4.95

Happy Purim!

by: Nicole Cohen

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4 Perfect Flan or Creme Brulee Recipes- Try One or All!

hanukka recipes and tablesettings, kosher dairy recipes, kosher dessert recipes, kosher recipes, mothers day recipes, shavuot recipes and ideas, Sukkot Recipes

4 Perfect Flan or Creme Brulee Recipes- Try One or All!

1 Comment 06 May 2011

Creme Brûlée Ramekins and Accessories at Amazon.com

Product DetailsServed all over Europe and the Middle East, flan is the ultimate dairy comfort dessert food that is traditionally baked in a rich caramel sauce.  In Mexico and Spain it is titled Flan, and in France it sounds much more gourmet as Creme Caramel. To see the French technique of making Creme Brûlée, just watch the video above by French chef Mark Bauer.

When I tasted this delectable dessert at Debbie Gindi’s birthday party luncheon, I knew I had to get the recipe for this  fantastic creamy treat.

Mrs. Renee Gindi, Debbie’s mother in law, was so thoughtful and sweet to write up three of her favorite flan recipes, and here they are to share with all of my Jewish hostesses. Serve your flan at your dairy holiday lunch, Shavuot, Mother’s Day, or Father’s Day.

(These dairy versions are the best, and I don’t even recommend trying to make it pareve because the calories are just not worth it.)

Just remember that there are 2 necessary steps to making the perfect flan:

1- Caramelizing the sugar (below)

2-Hot water bath (below)

Three Dairy Recipes for Flan:
First Step- Caramel as the base for your Flan:

  • To make caramel: Melt 3/4 to 1 cup sugar directly in “flan” pan over medium heat, stirring constantly to melt evenly until lit liquefies and turns golden. Don’t let it get too dark watch it without taking your eyes off the pan!
  •  Turn pan to spread caramel over bottom and sides to about 1 inch from top edge. Set aside to cool while preparing “flan”.

Hot Water Bath:

Set your flan pan inside  a larger pan and pour water into the pan into the larger pan until the water level comes to 1/2 inch to the top of the cake pan. Remove your cake pan and place water bath into a preheating 350 degree oven while you mix your flan. Pan should be in the exact center of the oven. Remove all extra oven racks in the oven. When flan is mixed and poured into ramekins or your pan, place gently into the water bath and bake.

Decorate your flan with sugar corkscrews- check out the video HERE.

 

Flan Recipe 1:

  • Boil and scald 1 quart of milk cool. Add 1 tbsp. of vanilla.
  • Beat 6 eggs very lightly and add ¾ cup of sugar. Add milk.
  • Pour over caramelized pan and cook in oven 350 over a baking tray filled with water for about 1 hour.

 

Flan Recipe  2:

  • 2 cans of evaporated milk- add 1 tbsp. of vanilla
  • 6 eggs
  • ¾ cup of sugar
  • Beat lightly
  • Pour over into a caramelized pan and bake as above in a 350 degree oven for one hour.

Flan Recipe 3:

  • 1 ½ qts. regular milk- Boil and cool. Add 2 tbsp. vanilla
  • 2 cans evaporated milk 12 oz.
  • 1 can of condensed milk 14 oz.
  • 10 eggs
  • ¾ cup of sugar
  • Beat and pour in a caramelized pan.
  • Cook in oven 1 ½ hours 300 degrees as above in a hot water bath as above.
Coolest Modern Judaica

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Coolest Modern Judaica

2 Comments 08 June 2010


“The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of things, but their inward significance. “- Aristotle

The simplicity of these designs will enhance your home, but more importantly, refine the mitzvot of Hanukah, havdalah, mezuzah, tefillin and kiddush.

For the  Jewish dad who appreciates fine design.

Check out these extra special Judaica pieces designed by Jewish artists. Though some of these items may be pricey, you will never tire of these timeless creations.

1- The ever changing menorah -A signed and numbered limited edition of 199 pieces by Yaakov Greenvurcel.  The Ever-Changing Hanukah Menorah is a dynamic sculpture, that one can rearrange in virtually endless configurations. Separate units of the Menorah can be used for Shabbat and for other occasions.It was awarded the first prize by the Bezalel Academy of Art, Jerusalem, 1980.

2-http://www.jerusalem-art.org/Embroidery by Adina Gat Artist-

These Tefillin bags, Challah covers, Chuppahs etc. are all hand embroidered to perfection. My brother in law had a koracha made up with Adina and it is absolutely magnificent. Contact Adina for more photos and custom orders.

3Modern Award Winning Havdalah Set by Silversmith DesignerSrulovitch Sari .Born and raised in Jerusalem. Graduated with distinction from  the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design, Jerusalem (BFA), and the Royal College of Art, London (MA). Her works of art have received many prizes and awards. Contact the artist for more info.

4-Sterling Silver and Gold Mezuzah Case $325

5-Sterling Silver Kiddush Cup by Piet Coen $585 for Jewish Museum members. Regular price $650.

6-Set of Kiddush Cups by Yaacov Greenvurcel- magnificent and modern sterling siver  kiddush cups. Contact the artist for prices.

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Whole Wheat  Zaatar Bread for Shavuot

kosher bread recipes, kosher pareve recipes

Whole Wheat Zaatar Bread for Shavuot

No Comments 09 May 2010

Zaatar Bread

It was 1980, and I remember visiting my Grandma Molly Sutton in her two-family home on Ocean Parkway in Brooklyn. Gathering all of her strenth, she proceeded to pull out a familiar piece of pita bread (or Syrian bread as we call it), and slice it legnthwise  into two large rounds.

She then carefully mixed some olive oil  into the home-made zaatar, spooned the mixture onto the pita circles, and slid the two rounds into her toaster oven.

This was a typical mid-day meal of hers.

She began to tell me how, as a 15 year old girl, she arrived in this country with her older sister Selma on a freighter vessel from Syria.

They did not have much food , but the one thing that they were able to find, was the comforting “Zet ou Zaatar” sold in the Arab quarters on the lower East Side. The zaatar spice was dark in color, so passer- bys who could not comprehend this middle eastern spice, called it  “dirty bread”. Nevertheless, it brought them back to memories of home.

Now, 30 years later, memories of my grandmother toasting her zet ou zaatar come to mind as I attempt to gather ingredients for my own whole wheat version of zaatar bread this Shavuot, 2010.

Even if you are lucky enough to live near a middle Eastern supermarket and can buy this delicacy

any weekday morning, there is nothing like the taste or aroma of your own home baked bread .

Perfect with a slice of cheese and tomato, or dipped into greek yogurt or lebne.

Recipe adapted from HERE.

How To Make Pita Bread- The Video

Ingredients:

  • 2 1/2 cups warm water (110 degrees)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon active dry yeast
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 2 cups whole wheat wheat flour
  • 3 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon vegetable oil

Preparation:

Dissolve yeast in warm water. Add honey and stir until dissolved. Let sit for 10-15 minutes until water is frothy.

Combine white flour, wheat flour, and salt in large bowl.

Make a small depression in the middle of flour and pour yeast water in depression.

Slowly add warm yeast water, and stir with wooden spoon or rubber spatula until dough becomes elastic.

Place dough on floured surface and knead for 10-15 minutes. When the dough is no longer sticky and is smooth and elastic, it has been successfully kneaded.

Coat large bowl with vegetable oil and place dough in bowl. Turn dough upside down so all of the dough is coated with oil. Allow to sit, covered, in a warm place for about 3 hours, or until it has doubled in size.

Once doubled, roll out in a rope, and pinch off 10-12 small pieces. Place balls on floured surface. Let sit covered for 10 minutes. Preheat oven to 500 deg F. and make sure rack is at the very bottom of oven. Be sure to preheat your baking sheet also.

Roll out each ball of dough with a rolling pin into circles. Each should be about 5-6 inches across and 1/4 inch thick.

Lightly brush the rounds with some olive oil and sorinkle generously with the zaatar spice.

Bake each circle for 4 minutes until the bread puffs up. Turn over and bake for 2 minutes.

Remove each pita with a spatula from the baking sheet and add additional pitas for baking.

Take spatula and gently push down puff. Immediately place in storage bags.

Storing Pita Bread:

Pita bread can be stored for up to a week in a pantry or bread box, and up to a month in the freezer. Be sure to use freezer bags when storing in the freezer.

Pita bread dough can also be refrigerated for up to one week in the refrigerator.

Buy Kosher Zaatar Here:

Or You Can Make it from scratch:

Two Zaatar spice mix recipes to choose from:

Combine salt,thyme , marjoram, oregano leaves, sumac and sesame seeds in a medium mixing bowl. Sumac is a dark red berry that grows on bushes throughout the Middle East and some parts of Italy. Sumac is sold ground or in dried seed form and can be found at most Middle Eastern markets, or can be ordered from an online specialty company. Store in a dry container until use.

When ready to serve, add the olive oil to the mixture to form a paste. This paste is the zaatar mixture.

1-

  • 1/4 cup sumac
  • 2 tablespoons thyme
  • 1 tablespoon roasted sesame seeds
  • 2 tablespoons marjoram
  • 2 tablespoons oregano
  • 1 teaspoon coarse salt

or:

2-

  • 3 parts toasted sesame seeds
  • - some recipes call for one part  toasted sesame seeds. -it really depends on your tastebuds!
  • 2 parts dried thyme
  • 2 part dried marjoram
  • 2 part oregano
  • 1/2 – 1 part powdered sumac salt, optional
  • coarse salt to taste

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In Memory of Our Fallen Soldiers

kosher recipes

In Memory of Our Fallen Soldiers

No Comments 18 April 2010

Today, Sundy April 18 is Yom Hazikaron.

Yom HaZikaron is Israel’s memorial day for its fallen soldiers.

On the evening preceding Yom HaZikaron and again, in the morning, a siren wails throughout Israel and everyone pauses for the one minute duration of the siren. Traffic grinds to a halt, and both pedestrians and drivers stand at attention silently, contemplating the sacrifices made for this country still struggling for survival.

Throughout the country, special services are held in honor of the fallen soldiers. The military cemeteries overflow with grieving families and friends, and others wishing to pay their respects to heroes who gave their lives defending the State of Israel. It is a day commemorating the loss of all men and women who died for Israel, whether they served in the IDF, Israel’s armed services, or were victims of acts of terror.

Jews outside of Israel feel Israel’s loss too – as it says in the Talmud, “Kol Yehudim areivim zeh lezeh” (“All Jews are responsible for one another”). Many light memorial candles, give tzedaka (charity) or learn Torah on behalf of the fallen soldiers.

On July 17, 2008, Karnit Goldwasser, buried her husband  Ehud, captured two years earlier by the terrorist group Hezbollah.

This video is presented in honor of all of the wives and mothers who mourn Israeli soldiers today, and forever.

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Rolling Yebrat the Easy Way

kosher recipes

Rolling Yebrat the Easy Way

No Comments 19 March 2010

Price $25. If you order before Passover, $20.

Every week I look forward to the sweet , tangy, gooey flavors of Yebrat on the Friday night table. The meat and rice filling is infused with spices and rolled  tightly to perfection inside a grape leaf .  This task is easier said than done.  I always dreaded rolling yebrat because I could never get them all to look like “soldiers in a tray” (to quote my mother). Now, a new gadget imported directly from the bazaars in Turkey has arrived in the heart of Brooklyn.

This gadget was almost impossible to find. I searched for months and months by calling all of these Middle Eastern specialty stores around the country.

It finally arrived! After a few minutes of trying to understand the Turkish instructions and diagrams it comes with, I figured out how to roll the yebra. It was amazing!!!! In seconds it rolled the grape leaf as tight as it can be. I am a perfectionist and the best part is they all came out the same width and length.

This yebra roller has 3 levels of thicknesses to chose from depending on the type of food you are rolling. It also works with
stuffed cabbage, spring rolls, meat filled cigars or anything else that rolls into that shape. Unless you’re planning a visit to the Turkish Bazaar, call to get this gadget today. Price $25. If you order before Passover, $20. Call
Donna Anzaroot at (917) 439 9917 or e-mail at mailto:donna9970@aol.com.

Watch the Video of the gadget roller in action!  http://thejewishhostess.com/2010/03/watch-the-yebra-roller-gadget-in-action/

Yebra roller has 3 levels of thicknesses to chose from

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Not Your Grandmother’s Lace….

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Not Your Grandmother’s Lace….

No Comments 17 March 2010

Metalaceart Holiday Lace Bowls

These Lace Holiday bowls can be found at Modern Tribe

Not Your Grandmother’s Lace….

By: Anna Katsnelson

Have you mislaid that beautiful lace that your grandmother brought from Hungary, Romania or Spain? Did you want to use it on your table during the upcoming holidays? Are you longing to start a new tradition this Passover or to continue an old one? What better way to celebrate tradition than by introducing into your home beautiful objects made by a female Jewish artist.

These works of art are exquisite holiday gifts, and will be treasured forever.

Israeli artist, Talila Abraham, has just what you’re looking for. Reclaiming lace for the 21st century, she creates antique lace designs on a variety of metals. Weaving metal like fabric, Abraham produces rare details on the everyday objects of a Jewish home. Elaborate mezuzahs, delicate coasters, dazzling serving bowls and platters are adorned with fine ornamentation.

Abraham uses stainless steel and brass to create intricate patterns that merge into flowers, leaves, petals, and snowflakes. From bobbin lace to ethnic embroidery: Abraham’s influences are the lace-making traditions of Belgium, Holland, Italy, Romania, and even the Beduin nomads. Abraham acknowledges these cultures while reasserting that handmade textiles can have a new life in metals.

Abraham was born in 1965 and graduated from two of Israel’s Technological institutes. She has devoted herself to researching and following in the footsteps of European and Middle Eastern lace-makers while creating an art work that is as relevant today as it was 100 years ago.

The Jewish Museum Shop in Manhattan has an exquisite selection of  Talila Abraham‘s works for sale.

Lace Matzoh Holder

Wild Lace Challah Basket

The Jewish Museum

1109 5th Ave at 92nd St

New York NY 10128

ADMISSION
Adults $12
Seniors (65 and over with ID) $10
Students (full-time with valid ID) $7.50
Children (eleven & under) Free

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