Tag archive for "New York Times"

Italian Plum Torte  – A  Rosh Hashanah “New Fruit” Dessert

kosher dessert recipes, kosher pareve recipes, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes, rosh hashanah desserts

Italian Plum Torte – A Rosh Hashanah “New Fruit” Dessert

10 Comments 26 January 2013

Italian prune plums are in season this month, and are a juicy “new” fruit for the Rosh Hashanah new year. They look like an extra large purple olive. In the 80’s, The New York Times printed this Italian plum recipe, and its been in my mother in law’s Rosh Hashanah recipe archive ever since. Its a moist cake recipe that can be made two weeks in advance and frozen with plastic wrap. When you pull it out of the freezer and warm it up, it will taste oven fresh.

This dessert is easy to make and gorgeous on your breakfast or Rosh Hashanah dessert table.

  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup margarine (we use Earth Balance these days)
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • Pinch of salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 12 Italian prune plums
  • Sugar & lemon juice – for topping
  • Teaspoon of cinnamon

Oven – 350 degrees

  1. Cream the sugar & margarine in bowl
  2. Add flour , baking powder, salt & eggs
  3. Beat well
  4. Spoon the batter into 8-10 inch spring form
  5. Split and pit the plums and place the halves on top of batter – skin side up
  6. Sprinkle lightly with sugar and lemon juice and cinammon.
  7. Bake about 1 hour
  8. Remove and cool
  9. Refrigerate or freeze if desired.
  10. Serve plain or with whipped cream, dust with confectioner’s sugar.

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Asparagus Pesto by Mark Bittman

kosher recipes, kosher rice and pasta recipes, kosher thanksgiving recipes, kosher vegetable recipes, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes

Asparagus Pesto by Mark Bittman

No Comments 09 August 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summer entertaining means pulling out pre-made gourmet extras from the freezer, and pesto is usually one of them. Pesto- (meaning paste) is  a no-brainer for pasta, or is great drizzled on sliced  mozarella cheese.  This recipe for asparagus pesto is a fresh twist on pasta-in-tupperware on the beach,  served on veggies as a side dish for barbeque (omit the cheese if serving meat), and as Mark Bittman suggests, you can even spread it on fish.

This recipe is quick in preparation.

Make and freeze in ice cube trays or flatten in baggies in the freezer.

watch the video Here

adapted from the New York Times

RECIPE

Asparagus Pesto

Published: May 7, 2010

Time: 20 minutes

  • Salt
  • 1 pound asparagus, peeled, trimmed, and cut into 2-inch segments
  • 1 clove garlic, or more to taste
  • 1/4 cup pine nuts
  • 1/4 cup olive oil, or more as desired
  • 3/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Juice of 1/2 lemon, or to taste.

1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and salt it. Add the asparagus and cook until fully tender but not mushy, 8 to 10 minutes. Drain well, reserving some of the cooking liquid, and let the asparagus cool slightly.

2. Transfer the asparagus to a food processor and add the garlic, pine nuts, 2 tablespoons of the oil, Parmesan, a pinch of salt and a couple of tablespoons of the cooking liquid. Process the mixture, stopping to scrape down the sides of the container if necessary, and gradually add the remaining oil and a bit more of the reserved cooking liquid to moisten if necessary. Add the lemon juice and season with salt and pepper to taste, pulse one last time, and serve over pasta, fish or chicken (or cover and refrigerate for up to a day).

Yield: 4 to 6 servings (about 1 1/2 cups).

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SYRIAN MEAT KEBABS FOR ENTERTAINING

kosher meat recipes, kosher passover recipes,seder table Ideas, kosher recipes, Passover Recipes, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes, rosh hashanah roast , lamb, and brisket recipes

SYRIAN MEAT KEBABS FOR ENTERTAINING

4 Comments 25 May 2011

Re-post by : Lisa Ades

This is a recipe I developed, featured in the New York Times dining section, as part of a piece by Julia Moskin called Burgers Without Borders.  These kebabs are savory and delicious and even good cold the next day (if there are any left over). (Year-round you can tuck them into a pita with salad, but during Passover, when you can’t eat any more matzah, why not go Atkins-style and just have them with a crunchy refreshing salad?)

SYRIAN BEEF KEBABS
Adapted by Lisa Ades
Time: 30 minutes, plus 1 hour for chilling

2 pounds ground beef (not extra lean)
4 tablespoons tomato paste
2/3 cup minced onion
2 teaspoons salt
Juice of 1 lemon
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 dashes cayenne
1 tablespoon ground allspice
1/3. cup pine nuts
Oil to brush on grill rack
Lemon wedges  for serving
Lemony cucumber salad, for serving (recipe follows).

1. Combine all ingredients but oil, lemon wedges, and salad in a bowl, and mix to combine.

2. You can make these on skewers, but it is much easier to form them and turn them on the grill without.  So just form mixture into torpedo shaped kebabs about 1 inch by 3 inches or into small patties.

3. Lay finished kebabs on a sheet pan and refrigerate at least 1 hour.

4. Prepare charcoal grill, or turn gas grill to medium-low. Spray or brush oil on clean grill rack, and set within a few inches of the fire. Fire should not be too hot, and rack should be at least several inches from heat source.

5. When rack is heated through, place kebabs on grill. Meat should start sizzling gently; it should not spit and turn black. Cook undisturbed until deep brown, several minutes. When meat lifts easily from grill, slide a spatula under kebabs and turn over. Continue grilling until browned on all sides and juicy, but cooked through. Serve hot with lemon wedges and lemony cucumber salad (when it’s not passover, serve also with pita bread that’s been warmed on the grill).

Yield: 4 to 6 servings.

LEMONY CUCUMBER SALAD
Time: 5 minutes

6 cups romaine lettuce (about 2 hearts)

1 long seedless cucumber or 3 Kirbys, peeled, halved lengthwise, and sliced crosswise 1/4-inch thick

3 tablespoons olive oil

2 teaspoons lemon juice

1/4 cup chopped fresh mint

1 clove finely minced garlic (optional)

Salt and black pepper to taste.

Toss all ingredients. Serve chilled.

Yield: 4 to 6 servings.

SubsrcibeHERE for great Passover recipes!

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Mark Bittman’s Chicken with Coconut and Lime

kosher chicken recipes, kosher recipes, purim recipes, baskets, and decor

Mark Bittman’s Chicken with Coconut and Lime

No Comments 01 March 2011

By Lucy Cohen Blatter

I have a confession to make: I’m not crazy about chicken breasts. Okay, I realize this isn’t a major revelation, but for a cook/blogger who’s trying to stay healthy, it’s a bit of a challenge. Sure, I love breaded and fried chicken schnitzels — who doesn’t? But I much prefer dark meat, and often find skinless, boneless chicken breast recipes to be dry and boring.

That said, I have a lot of faith in Mark Bittman . The former author of the Minimalist column for The New York Times (and current op-ed writer) is all about simplicity. Like me, he often embraces substitutions, too.

And his recipe for Chicken with Coconut and Lime does not disappoint.

The recipe includes an optional addition of nam pla, or fish sauce. To keep this recipe strictly kosher, I omitted that. To up the healthiness of the dish I went with light coconut milk (canned, of course :)).

As an added plus, if your are looking for some new kosher recipes for your Purim Seuda, then this one is a great choice as a main dish!

You’ll see in the recipe below how I changed things up a bit (I discovered I was out of cayenne pepper right before I started cooking). Next time I might sprinkle some peanuts on top to add a little bit of crunch.

All in all, it was a great dish. Served with coconut rice (made with leftover coconut milk and water), and steamed broccoli, I felt transported to Thailand. And that’s a good thing.

This recipe had seven ingredients including salt. That’s my kind of dish.

The coconut milk, lime zest and salt just kinda hang out on the stove for a while.

Bittman advises against flipping the chicken breasts over in the broiler. The tip must have worked because the chicken was moist, but brown and crispy on top.

Pouring the creamy sauce on the chicken. YUM!

The final product. Paired with coconut rice and broccoli, it was perfect.

Mark Bittman‘s Broiled or Grilled Chicken with Coconut and Lime* (with Lucy’s edits)

Time: 20 minutes (I’d say it’s more like 25-30 minutes when you take into account reading along with the recipe)

  • 2 limes
  • 1 to 1 1/2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts in 4 pieces
  • 1/2 cup canned or fresh coconut milk (I went with canned because on weeknights I’m looking for time savers)
  • Salt and ground cayenne pepper (I didn’t have any ground cayenne, so I substituted red pepper flakes. Totally  fine.)
  • 1 teaspoon nam pla, fish sauce (optional) (It’s difficult to find kosher fish sauce, and if you’re making chicken, forget about it. If you substitute fish for the chicken, though, and decide to use fish sauce, I’d hold off on adding salt. Nam pla is very salty)
  • 4 minced scallions
  • 1/4 cup minced cilantro.

1. Remove the zest from the limes, with either a zester or a vegetable peeler (if you use a peeler, scrape off the white inside of the zest with a paring knife). Mince the zest, and juice the limes. Marinate chicken in half the lime juice while heating broiler; adjust rack to about 4 inches from heat source. (Or grill the chicken if you prefer.)

2. Warm the coconut milk over low heat; season it with salt (hold off on this if you are using nam pla) and a pinch of cayenne. Add the lime zest.

3. Put chicken, smooth side up, on ungreased baking sheet lined with foil, and place the sheet in broiler. Add about half the remaining lime juice to coconut milk mixture.

4. When the chicken is nicely browned on top, in about 6 minutes more, it is done (if you want to be sure, make a small cut in the thickest part and peek inside). Transfer chicken to a warm platter. Add the nam pla, if you are using it, to the coconut milk; taste, and adjust seasoning as necessary. Spoon a little of the sauce over and around the breasts; then, garnish with the scallions and cilantro, and sprinkle with the remaining lime juice. Serve with white rice, passing the remaining sauce.

Yield: 4 servings

*Recipe from the New York Times

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Amy Atlas’s Secret Tips to Designing Your Own Dessert Bar

kosher dessert recipes, parties

Amy Atlas’s Secret Tips to Designing Your Own Dessert Bar

3 Comments 18 February 2011

Check out these gorgeous kosher dessert bars designed by the  famous NYC entertaining diva Amy Atlas.

Thank you Amy  for sharing your sweet kosher dessert design tips with Jewish Hostesses all over the globe!

A note to all our readers- Amy designs kosher dessert bars for all occasions including brit milahs, bar and bat mitzvahs, bridal showers, weddings, and any other happy occasion that you can dream up!

Amy’s tips for designing your own Kosher Dessert bar:

 

  • Take something that inspires you and create your dessert table around it. The design can be inspired from something as personal as a family heirloom to as simple as the pattern on the host’s invitation. Let the dessert table tell a story about the event so that the dessert not only becomes functional, but becomes part of the event design.

  • Create a beautiful backdrop for your dessert table. Décor elements complete the look of a dessert table and a fabulous backdrop is the perfect way to incorporate artistry to the table.

  • Pick beautiful linens and unique vessels to dress up your kosher dessert table. Since your sweets will be the star of your dessert table, the linens and vessels should have a coordinated, tailored look.

  • Always sample your dessert vendors before using them for your event. A beautiful cake is not always the best tasting cake! The key is to find the right balance. Pick kosher desserts that not only look good together, but provide a balance for your guests’ palate.

  • Incorporate some type of signage to dress up the dessert table. This will show your guests how personal your kosher dessert table is. You can have your stationer create personalized tags for you.
  • Provide goody bags for your guests as take-home desserts. It is always a treat to give your guests something to take home to remind them of how sweet the day was.

Amy’s favorite shops/online destinations for supplies:

“I love Michaels, Kate’s Paperie, and Lee’s Art Shop for supplies,

Crate and Barrel (www.crateandbarrel.com) is great for platters and vases.”

One of Amy’s favorite Kosher Dessert Recipes (something easy/fun to make): –

Chocolate chip peanut butter cookies or bars – I’m a huge chocolate peanut butter lover!

    • 2 1/2 cups graham cracker crumbs
    • 1 cup peanut butter
    • 1 cup butter, melted
    • 2 cups semisweet chocolate chips
    • 2 3/4 cups confectioners’ sugar

In a medium bowl, stir together graham cracker crumbs, confectioners’ sugar, peanut butter and melted butter. Press firmly into the bottom of a 9×13 inch pan. Melt chocolate chips over a double boiler or in the microwave, stirring occasionally. Spread melted chocolate over the crumb crust. Chill for about 5 minutes, then cut into bars before the chocolate is completely set, then chill until ready to serve.

Amy Atlas is a coveted entertaining expert, baking and crafting stylist, and is internationally recognized for creating the stylized dessert bar trend.  Amy’s work has appeared multiple times in InStyle Magazine, Parents Magazine, Better Homes & Gardens, The New York Times, Every Day with Rachael Ray, The Los Angeles Times, Food and Wine Magazine, Life & Style, Gotham, New York Magazine, Martha Stewart Weddings, Brides, and many more.  Her work has appeared on thousands of top US and international entertaining and lifestyle blogs.

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22 Summer Fast and Kosher Grilling Recipes by Mark Bittman

kosher fish recipes, kosher meat recipes, kosher recipes, kosher vegetable recipes

22 Summer Fast and Kosher Grilling Recipes by Mark Bittman

1 Comment 08 July 2010

Recently, Mark Bittman featured a great article featuring 101 Fast Grilling Recipes.
We’ve edited out the un-kosher ingredients and pared it down to the top 22 summer grilling ideas for all of our kosher cooks!
Which ones are your favorites?  Comment below and let us all know!
1. A winter dish, summer style: Brush thick slices of fennel bulbs with olive oil and grill over not-too-high heat. Cut oranges in half and grill, cut-side down. Put fennel on a bed of arugula or watercress, squeeze grilled oranges over top. Garnish with fennel fronds.
2. Best grilled artichokes: Cut artichokes in half, scoop out the choke, parboil until tender. Grill, cut-side down, until lightly browned; grill a couple of halved lemons, too. Combine the juice from the grilled lemons with melted butter, or margarine, or Earth Balance, and spoon over the artichokes. Finish with parsley.
3. Tahini tofu steaks. Thin tahini with lots of lemon juice and some minced garlic. Cut a brick of firm tofu into four slabs and brush with sesame oil. Grill over a moderate fire, turning a few times, until marked and crisp outside and custardy inside. On the last turn, baste with the tahini sauce. Serve on thick tomato slices with a drizzle of soy sauce and chopped basil, Thai if possible.
4. Spice-rubbed carrots: Roll peeled carrots in cumin, salt, pepper and brown sugar. Char, then move them away from direct heat and cover the grill until carrots are tender.
5. Grill bread; grind in a food processor to make coarse bread crumbs. (You can add garlic and/or parsley and/or Parmesan, or not.) Grill asparagus until tender. Top with bread crumbs and olive oil.
6. Brush slices of beet with olive oil and grill slowly until tender and lightly browned. Top each slice with a little goatcheese and some salad greens.
7. For perfectly ripe tomatoes only: Grill tomatoes, any size, until hot and lightly charred but not bursting. Drizzle with olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and serve with fresh mozzarella (or, even better, burrata) and grilled bread.
8. Halve and grill radicchio (or Belgian endives); drizzle cut sides with honey or plain vinaigrette, pesto or parsley pesto. Or just brush with oil .
9. Grilled guacamole: Halve and pit avocados; lightly char them, then scoop out the flesh. Grill halved red onion, too. Chop, combine, add tomatoes, lime, garlic and spices if you like
10. Root vegetable of your choice: Slice celeriac — or jicama, big potatoes, daikon or yams — and grill slowly, until very tender and browned. Drizzle with olive oil or melted butter and sprinkle with chopped rosemary or sage and olive oil.

11. Choose another root. Slice it, but this time char lightly and leave it crunchy. Chop and toss with chopped cilantro, a pinch of cayenne and juice of grilled lime.
12. Rub thick zucchini slices with a mixture of fresh or dried dill, yogurt, olive oil and lemon. (Or use pesto or parsley pesto.) Grill slowly.
13. More shopping than cooking: Grill an array of radishes on little skewers, four to six each. Serve with butter, salt and bread.
14. Halve Belgian endives. Brush with olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper and grill over moderate-to-low heat, turning once or twice, until soft and browned. Finish cut-side up and sprinkle with grated Parmesan; close the grill to melt cheese.
15. Lightly char whole or halved heads of baby bok choy; drizzle with soy sauce and top with chopped scallions.
16. Peel and thickly slice a not overly ripe mango. Brush very lightly with neutral oil and grill just until softened; sprinkle with cilantro and/or mint and lime juice (you might as well grill the lime first, too).
17. Grill pineapple (or anything, really, from tofu to eggplant). Make a sauce of half-cup peanut butter, a tablespoon (or more) soy sauce, a dash (or more) sriracha chili sauce, a handful of basil or mint and enough warm water to thin. (I’m tempted to say, “Throw away the pineapple and eat the sauce,” but the combination is sensational.)
18. An idea whose time has come: Halve and grill peaches, nectarines or apricots. Brush with barbecue sauce or, if you want to be sophisticated, a mixture of bourbon, sugar and mint, or simple syrup laced with basil.
19. An idea whose time will come in September: Halve and grill pears or apples. When they’re done, drizzle with yogurt, honey and a pinch of cardamom.
20. Grilled fruit salad, and why not? Toss grilled watermelon (really good), peaches, plums, pineapple and kiwi with honey, a little salt, lemon juice and tarragon (not much), chervil, basil or mint (or a combo).
21. Cut grapefruit in half. Sprinkle with brown sugar; grill, cut-side down. You might top this with chopped pistachios or a little honey.
22. Grilled poundcake (store-bought is totally fine) topped with grilled fruit sauce, strawberries in sugar, yogurt, ice cream, whatever.

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Green Garlic Caesar Salad with Anchovy Croutons

kosher recipes, kosher salad recipes

Green Garlic Caesar Salad with Anchovy Croutons

No Comments 11 June 2010

This week, the New York Times featured a brand new Caesar salad recipe and I can’t wait to try it. You see, I’m planning on making a Shabbat family lunch this summer in honor of my niece’s Sheva Berachot (the seven celebratory meals that happen after many Jewish weddings), and I would like to taste-test it this week. Anyone out there willing to beat me to it???  Please comment below!!

This recipe sounds like a winner!

read the article written by Melissa Clark, June 4, 2010

Ingredients:

1/2 cup of olive oil

7 anchovy fillets, finely chopped

1 large head green garlic (outer layer, stalk and root end removed) or substitute 3 large garlic cloves, finely chopped

3 ounces crusty day-old bread in 3/4-inch cubes (about 2 cups)

1/8 teaspoon kosher salt, more to taste

1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

1 1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard

1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce

2 large eggs

2 large or 3 small heads romaine lettuce, separated into leaves and torn into pieces, if desired (about 10 cups)

*3/4 cup Kosher Parmesan cheese, grated.

1. Make croutons: Heat 3 tablespoons oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add half the anchovies and cook, stirring, until they melt into oil, about 2 minutes. Stir in half the garlic and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about one minute. Add bread cubes, salt and 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Toast, tossing frequently, until croutons are golden and crisp, 3 to 5 minutes.

2. Make dressing: In medium bowl, whisk together remaining garlic and anchovies, plus lemon juice, mustard, Worcestershire and remaining pepper. Slowly whisk in remaining olive oil.

3. Bring a small saucepan of water to a boil. Lower eggs into pan. For nearly raw eggs cook for 90 seconds; for soft boiled, cook for 4 minutes. Rinse eggs under cold water until cool enough to handle.

4. Combine lettuce, cheese and croutons in a large bowl. Add vinaigrette and toss well. Crack eggs into salad, scooping out any whites clinging to shell and toss once more. Add salt to taste.

Yield: 2 to 4 servings.

*To all Sephardic cooks!! Sephardic Halacha rules that we are not allowed to serve fish and cheese in the same dish- so make sure to omit the cheese in this salad- it will still be delicious , it will then be pareve and you can serve it for a meat meal!

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White House Fruit and Oat Bars

kids, kosher dessert recipes

White House Fruit and Oat Bars

1 Comment 14 May 2010

Even if you aren’t lucky enough to have your own White House pastry chef,

your kids can still have a taste of  what the Obama girls snack on.

Try this yummy fruit bar taste tested by Michelle Obama herself, who has practically banished white sugar and white flour

from the White House kids menu.

(recipe reprint from The New York Times

read more about the White House pastry chef written by Julia Moskin)

Time: About 50 minutes, plus time for cooling

6 tablespoons grapeseed oil, or other neutral oil, plus extra for brushing pan

2 cups rolled oats

1/2 cup mixed seeds, such as pumpkin, sunflower and sesame

1/2 cup honey

1/3 cup dark brown sugar

1/3 cup maple syrup

Pinch of salt

1 1/2 cups mixed dried fruit, such as raisins, cherries, apricots, papaya, pineapple and cranberries (at least 3 kinds, cut into small pieces if large)

1 teaspoon ground cardamom or cinnamon.

1. Heat oven to 350 degrees. Line a 9-inch-square baking pan with parchment paper or foil, letting a few inches hang over side of pan. Brush with oil.

2. Spread oats and seeds on another baking pan and toast in oven just until golden and fragrant, 6 to 8 minutes, shaking pan once.

3. In a saucepan, combine oil, honey, brown sugar, maple syrup and salt. Stir over medium heat until smooth and hot. In a mixing bowl, toss together toasted oats and seeds, dried fruit and cardamom. Pour hot sugar mixture over and stir until well combined.

4. While mixture is warm, transfer to prepared pan, pressing into pan evenly with an offset spatula.

5. Bake until brown, 25 to 30 minutes. Transfer pan to a rack and let cool completely. Using the overhanging foil or paper, lift out of pan and place on a work surface. Cut into bars, about 1 1/2 inches by 3 inches.

Yield: 2 dozen bars.

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Mother’s Day Gifts for the Mom-To-Be

healthy body

Mother’s Day Gifts for the Mom-To-Be

No Comments 25 April 2010

These bestsellers are a thoughtful and inexpensive gift for the expectant mom.

Order now in time for Mother’s Day!

Gift wrap Available.

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Make Your Own Greek Yogurt-Video

kosher dairy recipes, kosher recipes

Make Your Own Greek Yogurt-Video

2 Comments 01 April 2010

Mark Bittman has done it again.

This DIY greek yogurt is yummy with the Syrian spice zaatar, olive oil, lemon, and salt sprinkled in.

Serve with Matzoh crackers  (or pita chips after  Passover), of course with a dairy lunch.  Spending many summers by my in-laws home in New Jersey, I can still see the blob of yogurt  inside the tied handkerchief  that was dangling over the sink. Its always considered a delicacy for the family, and my mother-in-law still drops off a batch of home-made yogurt every so often. The time has come for me to start making it myself!!  Watch the video and PLEASE send in pictures if you decide to make it yourself!!

Reprint from the New York Times

THE so-called Greek yogurt that has become popular in recent years is neither a special kind of yogurt nor uniquely Greek. It’s simply yogurt from which much of the water has been removed, a concoction that in its thickest form can be called yogurt cheese. You can find yogurt cheese in every country that has a history of yogurt making. In addition to being thicker and richer when eaten straight, it makes superior spreads and dips.It can be made at home from ordinary yogurt, and its consistency can be varied: it can be similar to sour cream, crème fraîche, or mayonnaise, for which it’s a good substitute, or it can be thick enough to cut with a knife.

Producing yogurt cheese is quite simple. It takes a couple of hours, but your presence is required only for minutes. All you do is strain some of the water out of yogurt, until it reaches the thickness you want. For straining, I recommend a colander or coarse strainer lined with a clean cotton dish towel of fairly fine weave, what used to be called flour sack. (Many recipes suggest the use of cheesecloth, but you’d have to use about 10 layers for the same results.) Dump a quart (or whatever quantity you like) of yogurt in there, set the colander over a bowl in the refrigerator, twist or tie the top of the towel, and wait.

To speed the process, squeeze every now and then, or don’t bother. When the yogurt has reached the consistency of sour cream, twist and squeeze once more and scoop out the yogurt, which will have been reduced in volume by about half. (I suppose you could save and drink the yogurt-water, or cook with it, but I don’t.) Store the thickened yogurt in a covered container and use it within a week or so for best quality.

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Chicken with Roasted Fennel by Mark Bittman of the NYT

kosher chicken recipes, kosher meat recipes, kosher recipes

Chicken with Roasted Fennel by Mark Bittman of the NYT

No Comments 25 March 2010

I love Mark Bittmans recipes. When I saw this chicken and fennel recipe featured in his column, I knew it would be a perfect for the holiday , since all of the ingredients are easy to find, and kosher for Passover. Its also doesn’t require too many complicated steps, which is exacty what we DONT need on Passover . Roasted fennel is also one of my favorites. I can’t wait to try it.

reprint from the New York Times :

Roast Chicken With Fennel

Yield 4 servings

Time 40 minutes
Given chicken‘s tendency to become dry during cooking, I’d suggest one of two options: Use all drumsticks and thighs; these will flavor the fennel brilliantly, remain moist even if you overcook them slightly, and give you the crunchiest skin. (If you separate drumstick from thigh at the joint, a simple cut, you’ll also reduce cooking time by about 10 minutes.) Or cut up a whole chicken. If you do this, cut apart the drumsticks and thighs so they cook almost as quickly as the breast pieces. Even then, you may want to remove the breasts early to keep them from drying out.

Ingredients for this Kosher Recipe
  • 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil, or as needed
  • 2 bulbs fennel, trimmed and cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 whole (about 3-pound) chicken, cut up, or about 3 pounds drumsticks and thighs
  • Chopped fresh parsley leaves for garnish
  • Lemon wedges
Directions for this Kosher Recipe
  • 1. Heat oven to 450 degrees. Drizzle bottom of shallow roasting pan or baking sheet with about half the olive oil and cover it with a layer of the fennel. Overlap pieces if necessary but use whole pan. Drizzle remaining oil over fennel and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast about 10 minutes. Meanwhile, cut up chicken if necessary and sprinkle the pieces with salt and pepper.
  • 2. Top fennel with the chicken parts, skin side up. Ideally, you’ll have a layer of fennel pretty much covered by a layer of chicken, but it’s fine if some of the fennel roasts uncovered. Spoon some of the oil from bottom of pan over chicken. Roast about 15 minutes, then baste chicken with pan drippings and rotate the pan. If necessary, adjust oven temperature so chicken browns but does not burn.
  • 3. The chicken will be done in about 30 minutes. Serve each piece with some fennel and a little of the pan juices spooned over, garnished with parsley and a lemon wedge.
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