Tag archive for "Orange juice"

Honey and Ginger Salmon with Grilled Orange Slices

kosher fish recipes, kosher recipes, rosh hashanah pasta, salads, and lunch ideas, shavuot recipes and ideas

Honey and Ginger Salmon with Grilled Orange Slices

2 Comments 25 April 2011

This recipe is a perfect main course for Shavuot. Kids and adults will love this version of grilled salmon. Double or triple the recipe for a large crowd.

  • 1/3 cup reduced-sodium soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup  freshly squeezed orange juice
  • 1/4 cup honey (preferably from the health food store)
  • 2 green onions, thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon kosher sherry or apple juice
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger root
  • 1 pound wild salmon fillet
  • one sliced orange
  1. In a large resealable plastic bag, combine the first seven ingredients. Add salmon. Seal bag and turn to coat; refrigerate for 1 hour, turning several times.
  2. Line an 8-in. square baking dish with parchment paper; coat the paper with nonstick cooking spray. Drain and discard marinade. Place salmon in prepared pan. Bake at 350 degrees F for 30-40 minutes or until fish flakes easily with a fork. The skin should slide off easily using a fish spatula.
  3. Place sliced oranges on a separate baking pan. Brush with orange juice and broil one or two minutes or until light brown and slightly crispy.
  4. Garnish salmon with sliced oranges. Enjoy!

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Six Charoset Recipes From all Over The World

kosher passover recipes,seder table Ideas, kosher recipes, Passover Recipes

Six Charoset Recipes From all Over The World

6 Comments 15 January 2011


When I came across this sweet medley of  Charoset recipes on My Jewish Learning I instantly appreciated the hard work that must have gone into gathering kosher recipes for The Book of Jewish Food: An Odyssey from Samarkand to New York.

The Book of Jewish Food was awarded the 1998 Jewish Quarterly/Wingate Book Prize for Non-Fiction, was the 1998 Glenfiddich Food Book of the Year and the 1997 André Simon Memorial Fund Food Book. (WOW!!!)

Claudia Rodin’s latest book is the award-winning Arabesque: Sumptuous Food from Morocco, Turkey and Lebanon. She is considered to be a leading authority of Sephardic cuisine.

I think I would try the Italian Charoset.

Which Charoset recipe would you try for your Passover Seder?


Charoset Recipes from all Over the World

The Book of Jewish Food: An Odyssey from Samarkand to New York

By Claudia Roden

Ashkenazi Haroset

On the Passover seder plate, haroset symbolizes the mortar used by slaves in Egypt. These are the classic Eastern European ingredients. Only the proportions vary.

  • 2 medium-sized tart apples
  • 1/2 cup (50 g) walnuts, chopped
  • 1/2 – 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2 – 3 tablespoons sweet red wine
  • 1 tablespoon sugar or honey or to taste

Peel, core, and finely chop or grate the apples. Mix with the rest of the ingredients.

Haroset from Turkey

  • 2 sweet apples weighing 1/2 lb (250 g), peeled and cut into small pieces
  • 1/2 lb (250 g) dates, pitted
  • 1 cup (150 g) raisins
  • Juice and grated zest of 1 orange
  • 1 cup (250 ml) sweet red Passover wine
  • 2 – 4 tablespoons sugar or to taste (optional)
  • 2 oz (60 g) walnuts, coarsely chopped

Put all the ingredients except the sugar and the walnuts together in a saucepan and cook on very low heat until the mixture is soft and mushy and the liquid is reduced, stirring occasionally. Add sugar to taste. The amount will depend on the sweetness of the other ingredients. Blend to a paste in the food processor. Pour into a bowl and sprinkle with walnuts.

Haroset from Egypt

  • 1/2 lb (250 g) pitted dates, chopped
  • 1/2 lb (250 g) large yellow raisins or sultanas
  • 1/2 cup (125 ml) sweet red Passover wine
  • 1/2 cup (60 g) walnuts coarsely chopped

Put the dates and sultanas with the wine in a pan. Add just a little water to cover. Cook on very low heat, stirring occasionally, until the dates fall apart into a mush. Cook until it thickens to a soft paste. Pour into a bowl and sprinkle with walnuts.

Haroset from Morocco

  • 1 lb (500 g) dates, pitted and chopped
  • 1-1/2 cups sweet red Passover wine
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 cup (125 g) walnuts, coarsely chopped

Put the dates into a pan with the wine, cinnamon, and cloves and simmer, stirring occasionally, until you have a soft paste. Put through the food processor if you want a smoother texture. Let it cool and stir in the walnuts.


A Libyan version is flavored with ground ginger, nutmeg, and cloves — 1/4 teaspoon of each.

Haroset from Italy

In Italy there are various regional versions of haroset. The haroset of Padua has prunes, raisins, dates, walnuts, apples, and chestnuts. In Milan they make it with apples, pears, dates, almonds, bananas, and orange juice. The following is a general version.

  • 3 apples, sweet or tart
  • 2 pears
  • 2 cups sweet wine
  • 1/3 cup (50 g) pine nuts
  • 2/3 cup (50 g) ground almonds
  • 1/2 lb (250 g) dates, pitted and chopped
  • 3/4 cup (100 g) yellow raisins or sultanas
  • 4 oz (100 g) prunes, pitted and chopped
  • 1/2 cup (100 g) sugar or honey or to taste
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger

Peel and core the apples and pears and cut them in small pieces. Put all the ingredients into a pan together and cook, stirring occasionally, for about one hour, until the fruits are very soft, adding a little water if it becomes too dry.


Other possible additions: chopped lemon or candied orange peel, walnuts, pistachios, dried figs, orange or lemon juice, ginger, nutmeg, and cloves.

Piedmontese Haroset

This recipe is adapted from one sent by Nedelia Tedeschi, of Turin. She enclosed a little picture of a squirrel eating a chestnut, from the package of dried chestnuts she uses to make the paste. It was Passover, and the Italian store near my house had closed, so when I phoned around to try to find dried chestnuts and couldn’t, I used cooked vacuum-packed ones instead. The result was very unusual and also delightful.

  • 1/2 lb (250 g) cooked chestnuts
  • 2/3 cup (125 g) blanched almonds
  • 2 hard-boiled egg yolks
  • Grated zest of 1 orange
  • Juice of 1 orange
  • About 3/4 cup (175 ms) sweet red kosher wine
  • 1/3 cup (75 g) sugar or more to taste

Boil the chestnuts for a minute or two, and drain. Grind the almonds fine in the food processor, then add the rest of the ingredients, including the chestnuts, and blend to a paste.

Claudia RodenClaudia Roden is one of England’s leading food writers. Her works include the James Beard Award winning The Book of Jewish Food and A Book of Middle Eastern Food.


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Shabbat Roasted Chicken-Six Ways

kosher chicken recipes, kosher meat recipes, kosher passover recipes,seder table Ideas, kosher recipes, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes

Shabbat Roasted Chicken-Six Ways

No Comments 01 September 2010

We dug up these recipes from our archives- perfect for the holidays…..

These unbelievable roasted chicken recipes are from  Mark Bittman’s blog ….Of course I recommend using organic kosher chicken.

All of these recipes are perfect for Shabbat and can be modified for the  Passover Seder.

PLEASE let me know if your family likes these new dishes!

Which one is your favorite?

Simplest Whole Roast Chicken, Six Ways:
Makes 4 servings
Time: About 1 hour
This method works because the high heat provided by the heated skillet cooks the thighs faster than the breasts, which are exposed only to the heat of the oven. It gives you nice browning without drying out the breast meat, and it’s easily varied. If at any point during the cooking the pan juices begin to smoke, just add a little water or wine (white or red, your choice) to the pan. This will reduce browning, however, so don’t do it unless you must. I suggest serving the pan juices with the chicken (you can call it sauce naturel if you like).
1 whole chicken, 3 to 4 pounds, trimmed of excess fat
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
A few sprigs fresh tarragon, rosemary, or thyme (optional)
5 or 6 cloves garlic, peeled (optional)
Chopped fresh herbs for garnish

Directions for Creating this Kosher Recipe
1. Heat the oven to 450°F. Five minutes after turning on the oven, put a cast-iron or other heavy ovenproof skillet on a rack set low in the oven. Rub the chicken with the olive oil, sprinkle it with salt and pepper, and put the herb sprigs on it if you’re using them.
2. When both oven and pan are hot, 10 or 15 minutes later, carefully put the chicken, breast side up, in the hot skillet; if you’re using garlic, scatter it around the bird. Roast, undisturbed, for 40 to 50 minutes or until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the meaty part of the thigh registers 155–165°F. 3. Tip the pan to let the juices from the bird’s cavity flow into the pan (if they are red, cook for another 5 minutes). Transfer the bird to a platter and let it rest; if you like, pour the pan juices into a clear measuring cup, then pour or spoon off some of the fat. Reheat the juices if necessary, quarter the bird (see the illustrations on page 685), garnish, and serve with the pan juices.
Herb-Roasted Chicken:
A little more elegant: Start the cooking without the olive oil. About halfway through, spoon a mixture of 1/4 cup olive oil and 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley, chervil, basil, or dill over the chicken. Garnish with more chopped herbs.
Lemon-Roasted Chicken.
Brush the chicken with olive oil before roasting; cut a lemon in half and put it in the chicken’s cavity. Roast, more or less undisturbed, until done; squeeze the juice from the cooked lemon over the chicken and carve.
Roast Chicken with Paprika:
With good paprika, quite delicious: Combine the olive oil with about 1 tablespoon sweet paprika or smoked pimentón. Roast Chicken with Soy Sauce(for Passover, use soy sauce substitute). Chinese-style roast chicken, made easy: Replace the olive oil with peanut or neutral oil, like grapeseed or corn. Halfway through the cooking, spoon or brush over the chicken a mixture of 1/4 cup soy sauce( for Passover, use a soy sauce substitute), 2 tablespoons honey, 1 teaspoon minced garlic, 1 teaspoon grated or minced fresh ginger (or 1 teaspoon ground ginger), and 1/4 cup minced scallion.
Roast Chicken with Cumin, Honey, and Orange Juice.
Sweet and exotic: Halfway through the cooking, spoon or brush over the chicken a mixture of 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed orange juice, 2 tablespoons honey, 1 teaspoon minced garlic, 2 teaspoons ground cumin, and salt and pepper to taste.
5 More Ways to Flavor Simplest Whole Roast Chicken:
There are many ways to flavor a roast chicken; here are some simple ideas to get you started:
1. Lemon: Use 3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice in addition to or in place of olive oil.
2. Lime: Use 3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice in a soy sauce mix (as in the Roast Chicken with Soy Sauce variation) or with some minced jalapeño or serrano chiles or hot red pepper flakes, chopped fresh cilantro leaves to taste, and a tablespoon or two of peanut oil (use Passover substitutes).
3. Honey-Mustard: Combine 2 tablespoons to 1/3 cup mustard with 2 tablespoons honey and rub the chicken with this mixture during the final stages of roasting.(use mustard substitute for Passover cooking).
4. Wine: Put 1/2 cup white wine and 2 cloves crushed garlic in the bottom of the roasting pan; baste with this in addition to or in place of the olive oil mixture.
5. Curry: In place of the olive oil, use neutral oil, like grapeseed or corn-or butter. Combine 1/2 cup coconut milk and 2 tablespoons curry powder and baste the chicken with this mixture during the final stages of roasting.(please use caution with recipe #5 for kosher Passover ingredients).


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