Tag archive for "Sukkot"

Whole Wheat Meat Hammentashen Empanadas for Your Purim Menu

purim recipes, baskets, and decor

Whole Wheat Meat Hammentashen Empanadas for Your Purim Menu

8 Comments 01 March 2015

 

Last year, as I was racking my brains for a new  Purim menu idea,  I decided  to take the easy way out and re-create my standard empanada recipe. In a pinch, I transformed it into a meat version of a Hammentashen. Usually I fold this empanada meat mixture into a wonton skin, and in the olden days (when I was young and skinny) I used to individually deep fry them as a special treat on Sukkot. Later on in life I got a great tip from my older sister, and I sprayed the meat filled-wonton skins with Pam (see*note below) and baked them till they were crunchy. For a last minute Purim appetizer, I decided to use the same delicious meat mixture and bake  it as a hammentashen. Here’s how I did it:

  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1 lb chop meat
  • 1/2 green pepper, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 tsp oregano
  • 2 tsp white vinegar (the vinegar tenderizes the meat)
  • 2 tbsp oil
  • 1 can tomato sauce
  • 10-20 stuffed green olives, sliced
  • 1/4 cup of sesame seeds
    1. Saute onions, pepper, garlic in oil adding garlic last.
    2. Mix in meat, oregano, tomato sauce, white vinegar and sauté all ingredients till meat is brown, making sure to chop the meat with a fork as it is cooking.
    3. Add sliced olives and mix with a fork.
    4. Place 1/4 cup of sesame seeds into a bowl.
    5. Take a whole wheat Mazor pizza dough and press into sesame seeds.
    6. Place pizza dough on a flat dish and mound 2-3 tablespoons of meat inside.
    7. Fold up and pinch all three edges as you would fold your hammetashen to form a triangle. You may freeze these meat hammentashen at this point.
    8. Bake at 350 degrees for about 25 minutes or until bottom of hammentash is lightly brown.
    9. Serve and enjoy!
    10. *P.S. I really wouldn’t recommend spraying Pam on my food anymore. This misto Olive Oil spray is much healthier and a cleaner way of adding some spritz to your baking and cooking.

Enhanced by Zemanta
A Glorious Sukkot Dinner Fiesta by Miriam H.

holiday table settings, sukkah and table decor, sukkot table settings

A Glorious Sukkot Dinner Fiesta by Miriam H.

1 Comment 10 October 2012

“LIKE” this post and share with your friends!

My neighbor Miriam is a beautiful woman inside and out. Her glowing personality is evident with every greeting, smile, and hug that that she gives with the utmost generosity. Miriam’s vivid and deeply hued table top Mexican themed dinner table decor instantly put her holiday dinner guests in a festive mood, and these pictures make me happy every time I look at them! These fiesta themed dinner  table top photos are truly beyond words, and I am so happy to present it to my Jewish Hostesses!

Miriam used Mexican blankets as her table runners, and scattered gloriously striped Mexican pillows among huge fruit and flower filled champagne glasses as her ingenious centerpieces. Her dining room table served as a buffet table as the huge doors behind beckoned her guests to the fabulous Sukkah that was built as an extension to her home. Thank you Miriam for sharing your fabulous Mexican themed Sukkkot dinner party with us!

p.s. If  you love this Mexican fiesta table setting theme as much as I do, then please checkout these Mexican party supply sites:

 

 

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta
Quinoa Salad with Pistachios and Pomegrantes

kosher pareve recipes, kosher recipes, kosher salad recipes, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes

Quinoa Salad with Pistachios and Pomegrantes

5 Comments 26 September 2012

This recipe is back by popular demand. Its a gourmet winner for a Rosh Hashanah lunch or Sukkot.

by Kady Harari -Kady Harari lives in Jerusalem with her husband Joey. She’s a food enthusiast, enjoys shopping at the local shuk (at times up to 3 times a day!) and teaches  “Traditional Syrian Cooking” to seminary girls studying  in Israel in a post high school program. She also owns the most magnificent upscale Jewelry and gift shop in Jerusalem. www.yigaljewelers.com

When our family visited Israel for a bar-mitzvah recently, Kady had catered a  delicious Shabbat sebet. (Did we mention that she also caters parties in Jerusalem???) We all raved over her quinoa salad . Something about the combo of pistachio nuts, lemon, and pomegrante seeds kept us eating until the whole taboule was wiped out!!! Thanks for sharing the recipe- Kady!

Quinoa Taboule

 

  • 1 cup quinoa, rinsed and drained well
  • 2 cups water
  • pinch of salt
  • 2 tsp oil
  • bunch of parsley chopped fine
  • 1/2 cup shelled raw pistachio
  • 1 red onion finely chopped
  • 1 pomegranate, peeled
  • optional- 2 tblsp.  pomegranate syrup
  • lemon
  • olive oil
  • salt
Heat the oil in a small pot, add quinoa and dry roast for 5 minutes. Add water and salt, bring to a boil, lower flame, cover and simmer for 20 minutes. Fluff with a fork and cool
Place the quinoa in a bowl and add the parsley, pistachio, onion and pomegranate seeds. Mix. Add the seasonings and mix well to incorporate the flavors. Enjoy!
Subscribe Now and win a chance to get a cool tank top and legging in your size from Jeanette at Stretch.
Enhanced by Zemanta
Update Your Holiday Table Decor on a Budget!

at home, DIY, holiday table settings, holiday tables, sukkah and table decor, sukkot table settings

Update Your Holiday Table Decor on a Budget!

No Comments 19 September 2012

This year, I decided to dump my tinsel sukkah decorations and try to find some updated sleeker last-minute looks. As most of my kids would rather get creative with a new latte in Starbucks, this year I  did not have the cute home made decorations that they used to bring home from second grade art class, and thankfully my fourth grader was really SO excited to help with the fun DIY napkin rings that we dreamed up together.

Step 1- I checked online at Jamali Gardens  and found gorgeous artificial hydrangea balls to hang from the scach or our Sukkah. Each one comes with a green ribbon loop that makes it easy to hang. You can buy them packaged in a set of 6, they come in lavender, green, and white, these gorgeous blooms can probably be passed down to your grandchildren if you keep them stored away with your Sukkah. (On the other hand, I think that they would be a great addition to a summer barbeque gracefully hung from an umbrella or awning.)

2- We shopped at IKEA and found some inexpensive botanical artwork to hang up as a modern Sukkah Decoration. It comes wrapped in plastic, which we kept it protected from the weather.

3-IKEA also had stunning $5 chandeliers in all shapes and sizes,

but unfortunately we did not make sure that they were waterproof,(we tried covering them with garbage bags) and unfortunately, they didn’t last too long…..

Ikea chandelier,REGOLIT Pendant lamp shade, white Diameter: 17 ¾ "  Diameter: 45 cm

4- We decided to make our very own crafty napkin rings. We ran over to Karen’s invitations on Avenue U in Brooklyn, and found lime green ribbon. Ran home, found a glue glun and, voila!


5- As for the dragonflies….. I bumped into Jill over at ETSY and she was able to whip up and ship 50 hemp knotted dragonflies for me to top off my DIY napkin rings. What do you think?

6- Table Runners- Craving something original, I decided to run back over to Karen’s Invitations and purchase some handmade papers that she sells by the sheet. If you are looking to buy some stunning handmade paper sheets online, you can CLICK HERE, HERE and HERE.

I decided to keep the ripped edge look of the gorgeous orange and gold handmade paper by folding each sheet down the middle lengthwise and ripping it slowly. Each sheet became a long rectangle, and I placed each edge under a lime green square table topper that I purchased from Michelle over at Table Toppers on East 4 Street in Brooklyn. Flowers, greens and ceramic containers are from Shirley Bar Nathan atop a fresh monstera leaf. The flowers and the monstera leaf lasted the whole week, and can be used over and over again! (The monstera leaf can also be used as a place mat.)

I always have simple glass votives and tea lights to scatter on my table for extra sparkle, purchased from Crate and Barrel.

 

 

7- You can also use your handmade paper to line the table for your bottles of kosher wine, and barware.
8-Don’t forget that even a brightly colored glass water bottle such as Perrier adds a splash of color to the table! Enjoy!!!!
9-What did you do to add a modern splash to your table??? I’d love to hear!!!  Questions??? Comment below!!!
Enhanced by Zemanta
Sensational Sukkah Display at Table-Set-Go Charity Event by the Seashore

holiday table settings, kosher recipes, sukkah and table decor, sukkot table settings, Table-Set-Go in Deal, New Jersey

Sensational Sukkah Display at Table-Set-Go Charity Event by the Seashore

No Comments 19 September 2012

This past summer, the Morris I. Franco Community Cancer Center hosted a fund raising event at the home of Charles and Ariella Ben Dayan in Deal, New Jersey. Ten teams of Jewish hostesses took on a different Jewish table setting theme that resulted a fierce competition. Though it was an extremely tough decision, Muriel Hidary and Barbara Franco were the table setting winners of the day.

During the festival of Sukkot ,its hard enough to get someone to put up your Sukkah decorations, but imagine how hard it is to build a Sukkah from scratch just for a charity event, for hundreds of women to check out- and then take it all down after 24 hours!! What a feat!!

When I sat down with Barbara and Muriel (a great team- I must say!!!) to discuss the mini- sukkah that they whipped up , they casually described how easy it was to:

  1. Create a faux chandelier by buying 2 bunches of branches and somehow figuring out how to suspend a bird’s nest from Michael’s Crafts with candles balanced atop the birds nest ring!
  2. Buy burlap, beautifully drape it as a table cloth using stick pins from Michael’s crafts in New Jersey.
  3. Sew a beautiful beige linen fabric onto the backs of folding chairs, and THEN wrap each chair with a darker beige gauze and tie together with a mini wreath- also from Michael’s.(how stunning???)
  4. Find real looking greens that resembled the green leaves that are found on the lulav- Hadass and Aravah.
  5.  Tie fishnet that adorned the back columns of the Sukkah.- (from A.C. Moore.)
  6. Sew fabric for back curtains- Lana fabrics in Brooklyn, N.Y.

More Gorgeous Details:

  1. Vietri dishes and Kim Seybert napkin rings were borrowed from “Aimee”.
  2. Each place setting had a name printed within a $1.99 garden daisy picture frame bought from Michael’s Crafts.
  3. The etrog box is antique and is inscribed with the owner’s initials.
  4. The centerpiece is a cylinder vase filled with lemons (etrogs weren’t available in August!)
  5. Artificial succulents- from A.C Moore

I’m sure you found some inspiration here!! Happy Holidays!!!!

Sukkah by the Sea

at home, holiday table settings, sukkah and table decor, sukkot table settings

Sukkah by the Sea

No Comments 19 July 2012

Last year, our Sukkah experience was extra special dining in Hymie and Liza’s Spanish style beachside home in New Jersey . Wood sukkah poles were  embellished with magnolia branches from the flower district in Manhattan. Baby pumpkin and squash,  fastened by mini hooks, were hung by thin rope from the bamboo “sechach.”  A huge thanks to our special cousins for a delicious and unforgettable Sukkot lunch!

Share your Sukkah pics!  Send to marlene@thejewishhosess.com

 

Meatballs in Tomato Cumin Sauce by Jennifer Abadi

kosher meat recipes, kosher passover recipes,seder table Ideas, kosher recipes, kosher thanksgiving recipes, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes, rosh hashanah roast , lamb, and brisket recipes

Meatballs in Tomato Cumin Sauce by Jennifer Abadi

1 Comment 10 November 2011

Thank you Jennifer Abadi for this delicious Sephardic recipe for meatballs in tomato cumin sauce ! So cozy for a cold winter’s  night!

Meatballs in Tomato Cumin Sauce:

  • ¾ pound ground chuck
  • 2 tablespoons matzah meal or dry plain bread crumbs
  • 1 large egg, lightly beaten
  • 2 tablespoons cold water
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ground allspice
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cumin
  • ¼ cup finely chopped yellow onions
  • Small dish of ice water

Tomato Cumin Sauce:

  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • ½ cup finely chopped yellow onions
  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic
  • Two 6-ounce cans unsalted tomato paste
  • 4 cups cold water
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons firmly packed dark brown sugar
  • 1¼ teaspoons ground cumin
  • ¼ teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon

TO SERVE

  • 1 recipe Basic Syrian Rice
  • 1 cup fresh or frozen and defrosted peas, steamed and kept warm, for garnish

Directions

1. Prepare the meatballs. Combine all the meatball ingredients, except the ice water, in a medium-size bowl and squeeze together with your hands until well blended and the meat is very soft. Shape into individual meatballs by rolling them between the palms of your hands, 1 tablespoon at a time. (Dip your fingers in the dish of ice water and keep your palms wet to keep the meat from sticking. If it does stick, scrape it off with a blunt knife and return it to the bowl.) Place the meatballs on a plate and set aside.

2. Prepare the sauce. Heat the olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat and cook the onions, stirring, until golden and soft, 3 to 4 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until golden, another 1 minute, stirring constantly so the garlic does not burn. Add the rest of the sauce ingredients and cook for 5 minutes.

3. Gently drop the meatballs into the sauce. Stir gently to coat the meatballs with sauce, being careful not to break them, and cook over low heat, covered, until the meatballs are fully cooked through and fairly soft but firm, 30 to 35 minutes.

4. Serve the meatballs and sauce hot over the rice in a large serving bowl and garnish with the steamed peas.

© 2002 Jennifer Felicia Abadi

 

Enhanced by Zemanta
Healthy Brown Rice Sauteed with Spinach and Mushrooms

gourmet kosher cookbooks, kosher passover recipes,seder table Ideas, kosher recipes, kosher rice and pasta recipes, kosher thanksgiving recipes, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes, shavuot recipes and ideas, Sukkot Recipes

Healthy Brown Rice Sauteed with Spinach and Mushrooms

2 Comments 18 October 2011

This is another healthy and easy kosher recipe from the Magen David Yeshivah Chef at Home gourmet kosher cookbook(page 206).  I made it for a Sukkot meal, but of course its great for any Jewish holiday menu, or Shabbat meal. Since I was voted to cook the meal for the second night of Sukkot (always so HARD because everything has to be done from the day before!) I cooked the rice and the mushrooms in advance, and last minute re-sauteed the mushrooms and adding in the fresh baby spinach till it wilted.

I multiplied this recipe by 4 because I was having a lot of company and I also added in a cup of cooked wild rice which was not in the original recipe.

Kosher Ingredients:

  • 1 cup uncooked brown rice
  • 1 cup COOKED wild rice according to the instructions on the bag
  • 2 cups Imagine No- Chicken Broth 
  • 1 medium onion
  • 1 pound (total) portobella and button mushrooms, sliced
  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 bag fresh cleaned baby spinach leaves

Directions:

  1. Combine washed rice and broth in a saucepan and bring to a boil, stir, reduce heat cover and simmer about 45 minutes till cooked.
  2. In another skillet, saute chopped  onion, mushrooms and garlic till tender. Stir in lemon juice and oregano.
  3. Right before serving, re-heat mushroom mixture and add in spinach until wilted- don’t overcook or you will lose the pretty bright green color of the fresh spinach.
  4. Toss brown rice with cooked wild rice, and mushroom and spinach mixture. Add salt and pepper to taste.

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta
Sarah’s Table-A Gorgeous Feast

at home, holiday table settings, sukkah and table decor, sukkot table settings

Sarah’s Table-A Gorgeous Feast

3 Comments 01 October 2011

My cousin Sarah is famous for her  gourmet cooking. Her holiday and Shabbat table setting should be featured in Martha Stewart magazine.

I saved this pic of Sara’s last year’s Sukkot table decor and menu- I wonder what she’s planning this year!!!

This Sukkot , PLEASE  take a picture of your table and share it with Jewish Hostesses all over the world!. Send it over to marlene@thejewishhostess.com.

Enhanced by Zemanta
The Prettiest Sukkah Decor Ever! A Breathtaking View of Jerusalem, Israel!!

holiday table settings, sukkah and table decor, sukkot table settings

The Prettiest Sukkah Decor Ever! A Breathtaking View of Jerusalem, Israel!!

1 Comment 19 September 2011

Thank you Naomi for sharing this breathtaking view of Jerusalem from your Sukkah 2011!!!  You are absolutely right!!! This is the best decoration yet!! If we can’t all travel to Israel this year for Sukkot, then let’s enjoy Naomi’s view!!!  

By the way, Naomi- LOVE the dishes, wine cup, challah cover, and your baby pomegranates!!!

Jewish Hostesses-please comment below!

What do you think of  this view of Jerusalem for Sukkot???

Marlene

“Hi Marlene,

This view is the best sukkah decoration. It is taken from my terrace in Jerusalem.

Sushi gefilte and chopsticks as well as Algerian lamb.
Naomi Sutton Neustadter”

Enhanced by Zemanta
Easy Linguine with Sun-Dried Tomatoes, Olives & Lemon

kosher recipes, kosher rice and pasta recipes, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes, rosh hashanah pasta, salads, and lunch ideas

Easy Linguine with Sun-Dried Tomatoes, Olives & Lemon

2 Comments 15 September 2011

 

Even though most people I know are obsessed with their Rosh Hashanah menus, weeknight dinners still need to get onto the table.

Here’s a great pasta recipe that’s tasty for a dairy weeknight with some grilled salmon, OR if you really can’t help yourself, then chalk this up on your dairy holiday lunch menu for Rosh Hashanah or Sukkot!

Thank you Michelle Safdieh for emailing me this fabulous pasta dish!

p.s. Please send all of your best recipes to marlene@thejewishhostess.com.

(P.S. WHEN IS ROSH HASHANAH 2011????- In case you need a reminder:)

Eve of First day Rosh Hashana
Wednesday, September 28, 2011 Light Candles at: 6:26 pm 1
Eve of Second day Rosh Hashana
Thursday, September 29, 2011 Light Candles after: 7:23 pm 1
Friday, September 30, 2011 Light Candles at: 6:23 pm 1
Shabbat, October 1, 2011 Shabbat Ends: 7:20 pm 1

 

Linguine with Sun-Dried Tomatoes, Olives & Lemon by Giada

  • 1 lb linguine
  • 1 cup chopped sun-dried tomatoes in oil drained
  • 1 cup med green olives, pittted
  • 1 packed cup fresh basil leaves, washed and dried well
  • 2-3 cloves garlic
  • 1/3 Cup extra virgin olive oil
  • zest & juice of 1 lemon
  • 3/4 cup grated parmesean cheese
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  1. Bring linguine to boil in salted water 8 -10 min
  2. Drain and reserve 1 Cup water
  3. In food processor, combine sun-dried tomatoes, olives, basil, garlic, oil, lemon zest & juice.
  4. Pulse until blended but still chunky.
  5. Add the parmesan cheese to the pasta and toss well. Pour tomato mixture on top
  6. and toss till pasta is coated.
  7. Season w/ salt and pepper.
  8. Can add pasta water if needed.

adapted from Giada De Laurentis – Food Network

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta
Peanut Butter Chocolate Ice Cream Delight- Parve

kosher dessert recipes, kosher pareve recipes, kosher recipes

Peanut Butter Chocolate Ice Cream Delight- Parve

3 Comments 20 September 2010

Everyone loves this easy parve dessert:

Ingredients:

Oreo cookies (parve)

Parve vanilla ice cream

¾ cup corn syrup

¾ cup Hershey chocolate syrup

¾ cup peanut butter

Line a 9 by 13 tin with parchment paper and spray with Pam

In food processor chop the cookies to from crumbs.  Press on bottom of tin  and bake in 350 degree oven for  10 minutes.

Let cool and smooth vanilla ice cream on top , freeze till firm

Separately combine corn syrup, chocolate syrup and peanut butter  mix until smooth . pour on top of ice cream  smooth out top with knife and freeze . When firm ready to serve.

Enjoy,

Lisa Bailey

Check out Blossom Bleu on the New Kings Highway for all of your giftware needs.

http://thejewishhostess.com/2010/09/blossum-bleu-giftware-on-the-new-kings-highway/

Enhanced by Zemanta
Shavuot- Everything You Always Wanted to Know

kosher recipes

Shavuot- Everything You Always Wanted to Know

No Comments 12 May 2010

Ever wanted to know Shavuot was all about, in your own terms? We found this tasty little Shavuot Digest from one of our favorite sites for fellow Jews-

Tablet.com.- A New Read on Jewish Life.

Its everything you wanted to know about our favorite holiday, from why we eat Cheesecake to the Book of Ruth’s juicy plot lines!

Enjoy!

WHAT’S IT ALL ABOUT?

It’s the day the Israelites got the Torah. As you may recall, they left Egypt in a bit of a hurry, and therefore it took some weeks until they were ready to attend to the business of receiving the word of God and become the official Chosen People. How many weeks? Seven, the Hebrew word for which, sheva, shares a root with the word Shavuot, which means weeks. To mark the occasion of having received the divine laws, we do what Jewish mothers everywhere would have us do year-round: study all night long.

Together with Passover and Sukkot, the holiday is also one of the Three Pilgrimages (or shalosh regalim, if you want to rock the Hebrew), annual occasions for the ancient Israelites to bring their harvest and livestock over to the Temple in Jerusalem for festivities and ritualistic slaughter. And while the pilgrimage part was abandoned—you know, exile and all—we still mark these three major holidays with special recitations of the joyous Hallel prayer.

ANY BAD GUYS?

Surprisingly, none. It’s one of those Jewish holidays without an awesome villain. Which is also why it’s one of those Jewish holidays not yet turned into a major Hollywood motion picture.

WHAT DO WE EAT?

Delicious dairy products. Cheesecakes are big. If your ancestors hail from the Tri-State area—Poland, Russia, Ukraine—so are blintzes.

WHY?

The rational explanation is that the Torah was given on the Sabbath, and as no animals could be slaughtered to celebrate the happy occasion, the Israelites likely shrugged their shoulders and collectively agreed to nosh on some brie. More mystical Jews—you know, Madonna—believe that the numbers speak for themselves: Dairy in Hebrew is chalav, and if you sum up the numerical value of the three Hebrew letters that make up that word you get 40. Which is a number you’d remember if you had to wander in the desert for as many years.

ANY DOS AND DON’TS?

First up, be happy. Why? It says so in Deuteronomy: “And you shall rejoice in your festival … and you shall only be happy.” Done rejoicing? Get ready for Yom Tov, which is a kind of Holiday Lite: You’re not allowed to work, use electrical appliances, handle money, or do any of the other stuff you can’t do on the Sabbath, but you are allowed to cook and bake, provided you use a pre-existing flame for lighting your fire and avoid that Kitchenaid. You can also carry stuff in public, another Sabbath no-no.

But Yom Tov’s less about the nays and more about the yays. Because we have to be happy, we’re obligated to prepare obscene amounts of food and invite the less fortunate to partake. Men are also expected to buy new clothes or jewelry for their wives, candy or toys for the wee ones, and flowers for the home, as Shavuot, celebrated in the spring, is also known as the Festival of Harvest.

ANYTHING GOOD TO READ?

You bet. Traditionally, we read the Book of Ruth on Shavuot. It’s like the Desperate Housewives of Canaan—Dead husbands! Levirate marriages! Sexy harvest scenes!—whose heroine is a Moabite who converts to Judaism and becomes the great-great-grandmother of King David (symbolism alert: Just as the Israelites accept the Torah and become Jews, Ruth embraces the Torah and becomes a Jew herself). King David, by the way, is said to have been born and died on Shavuot, which makes the book apropos, as do said harvest scenes.

And then, of course, there’s the matter of all-night learning. We weren’t kidding about that: It’s called a tikkun, Hebrew for correction, and tradition has it that since the Jews didn’t rise early enough to receive the Torah in Sinai—some accounts have God himself nudging them from their sleep, in what must have been the most terrifying wake-up call ever—they have resolved to stay up all night and study the Torah, commemorate the day it was given, and make up for the drowsiness of their ancestors. While religious Jews still adhere to Torah study, many less observant ones choose to spend the night studying anything from Jewish history, poetry, and art to contemporary Israeli television shows.

Reprinted from Tablet Magazine.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Personalize Your Party and Chic Gifts!

5b1f13324fde11e39934128dfbc5ee3d_8

Categories

“Like” us on Facebook!

© 2016The Jewish Hostess - Kosher Recipes, Jewish Recipes, Gourmet Kosher Recipes®