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At Least 10 Hamud Soup Versions for the Syrian Jewish Shabbat Meal

kosher meat recipes, kosher recipes, kosher soup recipes, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes, shabbat recipes, Sukkot Recipes

At Least 10 Hamud Soup Versions for the Syrian Jewish Shabbat Meal

1 Comment 28 August 2012

You can typically smell the aromas of the lemony-minty hamud that has been cooking for hours on the stove of a Syrian Jewish household on a Friday afternoon.

Hamud is the Syrian version of the Ashkenaz chicken soup. It includes a  medley of usually 3 vegetables- carrots, potatoes, and celery, treasured kibbe balls are thrown in midway-and is served over white or brown rice.

The kibbe ball was always an art form and a source of pride for every Syrian Jewish mom, and rightfully so. It represented the love and time spent on each dish prepared for the family, especially on a Friday night. I’m sure that 99 percent of my generation’s Syrian women do remember that their mothers and grandmother used to sit at the dinette table rolling their kibbe homda balls to perfection, nowadays, the time to make the kibbe balls has eroded as the women run out to work, exercise, or run on daily errands. These errands usually incude a trip to the local kosher butcher in Brooklyn, NY who hire ladies to roll and pack the kibbe ball for us. You can even find turkey kibbe balls on the market today.

As a side note, I remember the day that I asked my husband’s grandmother to teach me how to make kibbe balls. She told me where to buy the 2 kinds of meat that we needed for the kibbes. I must have purchased the meat on a Monday, left it in the fridge, and gotten involved with shopping and manicures for 4 or 5 days. On Friday, I proudly brought over the meat. It had turned brown and slightly smelly by then, but as a new bride, I hardly noticed. Well. needless to say, she sent me right home with that meat! I don’t think she ever got around to teaching me how to roll the kibbes, but I did learn that you shouldn’t leave raw meat sitting in the fridge for a week.

I would love to see our families preserve as much of our Syrian Jewish heritage, especially with all of the horrible news reports about the destruction in Aleppo and Damascus which was the home for our Syrian Jewish community for thousands of years.  For interesting info about what’s happened to our communities’ rich cultural structures and heritage in Aleppo and Damascus click over to this article by Tablet Magazine written by fellow community member Joseph Dana over in Israel.

Here are some kibbe homda variations sent in by some ladies of our community.  Below is the Instagram thread that started this whole post! Please send in your kibbe homda variations to marlene (at) thejewishhostess.com and I will add them in.

By the way- you can always see what The Jewish Hostess Hostess is up to- just follow me on Instagram!

Share and enjoy!

Deal Delights Cookbook Adaptation for Hamud:

1- This is the version the I use from the red Deal Delights cookbook. I’ve added 1/2 cup of tamarind sauce (ourt) and a whole potato that boils with the mixture and gets mashed at the end to add to the thickness of the sauce.

Hamud Ingredients:

  • 1 qt water
  • 1 large potato – cubed
  • 1 large whole potato
  • 2 stalks celery cubed
  • 2 carots peeled and diced
  • 2-4 cloves garlic
  • juice of 2 lemons
  • 1/2 tsp kosher salt
  • palmful of crushed mint leaves

Bring vegetables to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes.

Crush garlic with the back of a pyrex cup and mash with kosher salt. Add to vegetables.

Add lemon juice and mint leaves. Simmer for 10 minutes. Add 1/2 cup of tamarind sauce (I love Mrs Maslaton’s ourt sold at Kosher Corner in Brooklyn).

Cook for about 1 hour covered.

Add kibbe – simmer uncovered about 1/2 hour- 45 minutes.

Mash the whole potato when soft to add to thicker consistency.

2- Kibbe Homda Recipe by Odette Tebele Rishty:

“Probably the toughest recipe ever …to give exact measurements and directions for. All grandmas give it over like this… Then you put the lemon juice and we say how much sito? And they say ‘just put!’. Then you put the salt and we say how much and they say ‘just put!’ haha. The point is to know exactly what you want it to taste like and a cook who is comfortable in their kitchen and is experienced with food will get it.

This is a Halab recipe. (Alleppo syria) My grandma left there and went to Mexico and married at 16 in Mexico. This recipe’s end result is an orange to red looking Hamud.   Its salty lemony sauce has sugar added but only a drop enough to enhance .. The sweetness is not tasted —I’ve tasted within my own grandmas daughters a slightly sweeter version and my grandmas was even less sweet – my mom’s Adela (Chayo )Tebele. ah’ was in deed the best! This is how I make it and she loved my Hamud!

I don’t have time to give directions-  I think anyone can figure it out if they make Hamud ! All mom’s son in laws and grandchildren loved this Hamud the best! Egyptian son in law included! She’d get visits for leftovers from son in laws and older grandchildren and grandchildren bringing her great grandchildren for another taste even on a Monday for leftovers!

  • Lots Celery
  • Lots Carrots
  • 1 lg onion onion small slithers cook til just clear not more(that is the first thing in the pot with a little oil )
  • Water fill till half of pot (med to large pot)
  • 1 marrow bone this adds tons of flavor
  • 1Can of tomato sauce (small can for med pot , large can for a really big pot)
  • Lemon juice (at least two cups maybe more will be needed as you go along)
  • 2-3 tablespoons of sugar
  • 1 peeled potato cut up in small chunks
  • Crushed garlic 3-4 cloves ,dry mint leaves crushed kosher salt and oil 1-2 tbsp to make paste and add to Hamood soup as cooking
  • Probably will need to add salt a few times.

Taste and add ingredients if needed after a good 15 minute boil. Then add kibbes when ur happy with the taste (so your not meat for the day- If you need to still have coffee & the like :)  )Then allow it to cook for at least 45 min covered slightly ajar .. .Bubbling slightly then lower the flameMy sister variated to this and I honed in on it – and asked her secret -she added a fresh lemon and a fresh lime (either or can be used but i use both including the juicy inside

pieces ) squeezed into the soup — along with the usual store bought lemon juice — it definitely enhances the flavor to be more Middle Eastern as it creates a stronger more delicacy-like robust flavor.
(for a really big Hamud pot I would say not to double the ingredients- a little less than double)
Anyone can email me for questions if anything is unclear or they need help with it.  Itsallagift1@aol.com.
When I was finally able to make Hamud good everytime it was my proudest moment to be able to carry on the tradition!
My mom’s magic is working– to keep a family coming back for visits– now my married daughter makes sure to come back for Hamood and tries to even take some home after shabbat for my granddaughter who just started eating regular food — she loves it too!!!Happy hamud perfecting! May the tradition-carrying force be with you! “
Odette (Tebele )Rishty

 

3-  Kibbe Homda by Lisa Ades:

Sour Spearmint Sauce/Soup with Meatballs (Hamud) by Lisa Ades

  • 5 medium boiling potatoes, peeled and cut in
  • 1 lb ground beef
  • salt
  • 1 1/2-inch pieces
  • 3 stalks celery, diced
  • 1 lb. veal stew meat, cut into 1 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1-2 cups fresh lemon juice
  • 1 head garlic, clves peeled and minced
  • 1/2 cup dried spearmint
  • 1/2 cup sugar

Place ground beef in a large bowl. Season with salt, mix well, then
shape into 1″ meatballs. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside.

Place potatoes, celery, veal, lemon juice, garlic, spearmint, and sugar
in a large pot. Add 8 cups water and bring to a boil over high heat.
Reduce heat to low, add meatballs, cover, and simmer, stirring
occasionally, for 1 hour. Using a long-handled spoon, stir soup,
mashing potatoes just enough to slightly thicken soup. Cover and
continue cooking until veal is tender, about 2 hours more.

Adjust seasoning with additional salt, sugar and lemon juice, if
necessary. Ladle into bowls or serve over rice.

 

4- Jen Ashkenazi- from my grandma’s cookbook:

“Cooking with Grandma” was made by the Children & Grandchildren of Marjorie Ashkenazie A”H.  We were all able to pick our favorite recipe from our Grandmother & write a small story from the memories that brought us back to that recipe . This cookbook is my favorite tool in the kitchen because I know my grandmother is watching over me & guiding me in the correct direction .

“Cooking With Grandma” can be purchased online from the below Link ;

http://www.blurb.com/bookstore/detail/2430715?alt=Cooking+with+Grandma+-+revised+edition%2C+as+listed+under+Cooking

 

5- Kibbe Homda by Sara Ash

  • Water
  • Crushed garlic
  • Lemon juice real lemon
  • Kosher salt
  • Fresh mint
  • Chopped celery carrots potatoes
  • Jerusalem glatt kibbe balls bought from the kosher butcher on East 8 in Brooklyn, NY.
“Kibbe meat is the best if u make your own …
Fill medium size pot 3/4 full w/ water crushed garlic and salt bring to boil . Add 1 bunch of fresh mint chopped ..bring to boil add lemon juice from bottle count to 12 .
Bring to boil add carrots and celery boil for 10 add kibbe balls and potatoes .
Boil until potatoes get soft .. Consistency will be thicker .. Flame should be low …
My families favorite I never make enough!”

 

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Joan Nathan’s Juicy Brisket Braised in Pomegranate Juice

kosher meat recipes, kosher passover recipes,seder table Ideas, kosher recipes, Passover Recipes, rosh hashanah and sukkot recipes, rosh hashanah roast , lamb, and brisket recipes

Joan Nathan’s Juicy Brisket Braised in Pomegranate Juice

1 Comment 20 August 2012

 

Many   brisket recipes are so deliciously sweet and sticky due to the fact that its too easy to pour sugar based sauces on top and slide it into the oven for a quick and scrumtious meal. I have to admit that very often I fall into the same sweet roast trap, but lately I’ve been on the hunt for a  “healthier” version of a kosher roast recipe that wont make my family’s blood sugar levels shoot up. I think I’ve found the right flavors here with Joan Nathan‘s recipe. Pomegranate juice adds just the right amount of sweetness, and the vegetables and herbs bring out the flavor of the meat instead of disguising it. Enjoy- and let me know how you like it! I’m planning to make it for one of the Rosh Hahanah dinners. Marlene.

 


Brisket Braised in Pomegranate Juice by Joan Nathan
reprinted with permission from Tablet Magazine.

  • One  4 ½-pound brisket
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 medium onions, peeled and coarsely chopped
  • 2 leeks, cleaned, and chopped, using the white and light green only
  • 6 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 2 large carrots, peeled and coarsely chopped
  • 1 celery stalk, peeled and coarsely chopped
  • 2 ½ to 3 cups pomegranate juice
  • 3 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 2 sprigs fresh rosemary
  • 2 bay leaves

1. Season the brisket with salt and pepper. Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a heavy pan or Dutch oven, brown the brisket on all sides, and set aside.

2. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Add the onions and leeks in the pan in which you browned the brisket, and cook until soft. Add the garlic, carrots and the celery. Continue cooking for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

3. Add 1 1/2 cups of the pomegranate juice to the pan and bring the mixture to the boil, making sure to scrape the bottom of the pan as you stir. Add another cup of pomegranate juice, the thyme, rosemary and bay leaves to the pan and allow to simmer. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

4. Return the brisket to the pan, fat-side up, spooning the vegetables and juices over the meat. Cover the pan tightly (use foil if the pan doesn’t have a lid), and braise the brisket in the oven, basting every half hour or so until the meat is tender, for about 3 hours.

5. Allow the brisket to rest before slicing and serving. (I leave it overnight in the refrigerator. The next day I cut it thin, against the grain, on the bias.) Lay the brisket over the onions and leeks and the gravy, reheat, and serve with the onion confit (see below.)

Yield: about 8 servings

Onion Confit

  • 3 large onions, peeled and cut in slivers
  • 4 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 cup red wine
  • 1 cup chicken broth

1. Sauté the onions in the oil for about 10 to 15 minutes or until they start to turn golden.

2. Add salt and pepper to taste, the sugar, the wine, and the chicken broth. Cook them, uncovered, for another 10 minutes or until the onions are very soft. Taste, adding more sugar or salt, if necessary, and serve.

 

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Shavuot- Everything You Always Wanted to Know

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Shavuot- Everything You Always Wanted to Know

No Comments 12 May 2010

Ever wanted to know Shavuot was all about, in your own terms? We found this tasty little Shavuot Digest from one of our favorite sites for fellow Jews-

Tablet.com.- A New Read on Jewish Life.

Its everything you wanted to know about our favorite holiday, from why we eat Cheesecake to the Book of Ruth’s juicy plot lines!

Enjoy!

WHAT’S IT ALL ABOUT?

It’s the day the Israelites got the Torah. As you may recall, they left Egypt in a bit of a hurry, and therefore it took some weeks until they were ready to attend to the business of receiving the word of God and become the official Chosen People. How many weeks? Seven, the Hebrew word for which, sheva, shares a root with the word Shavuot, which means weeks. To mark the occasion of having received the divine laws, we do what Jewish mothers everywhere would have us do year-round: study all night long.

Together with Passover and Sukkot, the holiday is also one of the Three Pilgrimages (or shalosh regalim, if you want to rock the Hebrew), annual occasions for the ancient Israelites to bring their harvest and livestock over to the Temple in Jerusalem for festivities and ritualistic slaughter. And while the pilgrimage part was abandoned—you know, exile and all—we still mark these three major holidays with special recitations of the joyous Hallel prayer.

ANY BAD GUYS?

Surprisingly, none. It’s one of those Jewish holidays without an awesome villain. Which is also why it’s one of those Jewish holidays not yet turned into a major Hollywood motion picture.

WHAT DO WE EAT?

Delicious dairy products. Cheesecakes are big. If your ancestors hail from the Tri-State area—Poland, Russia, Ukraine—so are blintzes.

WHY?

The rational explanation is that the Torah was given on the Sabbath, and as no animals could be slaughtered to celebrate the happy occasion, the Israelites likely shrugged their shoulders and collectively agreed to nosh on some brie. More mystical Jews—you know, Madonna—believe that the numbers speak for themselves: Dairy in Hebrew is chalav, and if you sum up the numerical value of the three Hebrew letters that make up that word you get 40. Which is a number you’d remember if you had to wander in the desert for as many years.

ANY DOS AND DON’TS?

First up, be happy. Why? It says so in Deuteronomy: “And you shall rejoice in your festival … and you shall only be happy.” Done rejoicing? Get ready for Yom Tov, which is a kind of Holiday Lite: You’re not allowed to work, use electrical appliances, handle money, or do any of the other stuff you can’t do on the Sabbath, but you are allowed to cook and bake, provided you use a pre-existing flame for lighting your fire and avoid that Kitchenaid. You can also carry stuff in public, another Sabbath no-no.

But Yom Tov’s less about the nays and more about the yays. Because we have to be happy, we’re obligated to prepare obscene amounts of food and invite the less fortunate to partake. Men are also expected to buy new clothes or jewelry for their wives, candy or toys for the wee ones, and flowers for the home, as Shavuot, celebrated in the spring, is also known as the Festival of Harvest.

ANYTHING GOOD TO READ?

You bet. Traditionally, we read the Book of Ruth on Shavuot. It’s like the Desperate Housewives of Canaan—Dead husbands! Levirate marriages! Sexy harvest scenes!—whose heroine is a Moabite who converts to Judaism and becomes the great-great-grandmother of King David (symbolism alert: Just as the Israelites accept the Torah and become Jews, Ruth embraces the Torah and becomes a Jew herself). King David, by the way, is said to have been born and died on Shavuot, which makes the book apropos, as do said harvest scenes.

And then, of course, there’s the matter of all-night learning. We weren’t kidding about that: It’s called a tikkun, Hebrew for correction, and tradition has it that since the Jews didn’t rise early enough to receive the Torah in Sinai—some accounts have God himself nudging them from their sleep, in what must have been the most terrifying wake-up call ever—they have resolved to stay up all night and study the Torah, commemorate the day it was given, and make up for the drowsiness of their ancestors. While religious Jews still adhere to Torah study, many less observant ones choose to spend the night studying anything from Jewish history, poetry, and art to contemporary Israeli television shows.

Reprinted from Tablet Magazine.

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