Tag archive for "zaatar spice"

Revised!- Zaatar Mini Pizzas

kosher dairy recipes, kosher recipes, mothers day recipes, rosh hashanah pasta, salads, and lunch ideas, shavuot recipes and ideas

Revised!- Zaatar Mini Pizzas

5 Comments 02 May 2011

This recipe was such a hit that I decided to re-post it. Zaatar is a tangy, addictive spice that is actually a mixture of dried herbs, sesame seeds,  sumac, and salt.  It is a centuries-old mixture dating back to at least the 13th century. Exactly what those herbs are, and how all those ingredients are proportioned vary from culture to culture and family to family. If you would like to create your own memorable zaatar recipe, you  can start  HERE, and  give or take a little until you create your own personal zaatar potpourri.

Great last minute yummy pizza!

Kids and adults love it- great for parties! Perfect for your Purim Seuda!!

    • Mazor’s Pizza Dough- these come ready made- I buy whole wheat mini pizza doughs at Kosher Corner.
    • Zaatar spice
    • olive oil
    • shredded low fat mozzarella cheese
    • delete the cheese, or use cheese substitute and it becomes dairy-free and vegan!
  1. place pizza doughs on Pam sprayed parchment paper on a cookie sheet
  2. mix zaatar with 1 teaspoon of olive oil, salt,  pepper and sesame seeds (to taste) in a small bowl
  3. spoon mixture on top of each pizza dough
  4. sprinkle cheese on top of each one
  5. bake at 350 degrees for about 20 minutes

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Whole Wheat  Zaatar Bread for Shavuot

kosher bread recipes, kosher pareve recipes

Whole Wheat Zaatar Bread for Shavuot

No Comments 09 May 2010

Zaatar Bread

It was 1980, and I remember visiting my Grandma Molly Sutton in her two-family home on Ocean Parkway in Brooklyn. Gathering all of her strenth, she proceeded to pull out a familiar piece of pita bread (or Syrian bread as we call it), and slice it legnthwise  into two large rounds.

She then carefully mixed some olive oil  into the home-made zaatar, spooned the mixture onto the pita circles, and slid the two rounds into her toaster oven.

This was a typical mid-day meal of hers.

She began to tell me how, as a 15 year old girl, she arrived in this country with her older sister Selma on a freighter vessel from Syria.

They did not have much food , but the one thing that they were able to find, was the comforting “Zet ou Zaatar” sold in the Arab quarters on the lower East Side. The zaatar spice was dark in color, so passer- bys who could not comprehend this middle eastern spice, called it  “dirty bread”. Nevertheless, it brought them back to memories of home.

Now, 30 years later, memories of my grandmother toasting her zet ou zaatar come to mind as I attempt to gather ingredients for my own whole wheat version of zaatar bread this Shavuot, 2010.

Even if you are lucky enough to live near a middle Eastern supermarket and can buy this delicacy

any weekday morning, there is nothing like the taste or aroma of your own home baked bread .

Perfect with a slice of cheese and tomato, or dipped into greek yogurt or lebne.

Recipe adapted from HERE.

How To Make Pita Bread- The Video

Ingredients:

  • 2 1/2 cups warm water (110 degrees)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon active dry yeast
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 2 cups whole wheat wheat flour
  • 3 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon vegetable oil

Preparation:

Dissolve yeast in warm water. Add honey and stir until dissolved. Let sit for 10-15 minutes until water is frothy.

Combine white flour, wheat flour, and salt in large bowl.

Make a small depression in the middle of flour and pour yeast water in depression.

Slowly add warm yeast water, and stir with wooden spoon or rubber spatula until dough becomes elastic.

Place dough on floured surface and knead for 10-15 minutes. When the dough is no longer sticky and is smooth and elastic, it has been successfully kneaded.

Coat large bowl with vegetable oil and place dough in bowl. Turn dough upside down so all of the dough is coated with oil. Allow to sit, covered, in a warm place for about 3 hours, or until it has doubled in size.

Once doubled, roll out in a rope, and pinch off 10-12 small pieces. Place balls on floured surface. Let sit covered for 10 minutes. Preheat oven to 500 deg F. and make sure rack is at the very bottom of oven. Be sure to preheat your baking sheet also.

Roll out each ball of dough with a rolling pin into circles. Each should be about 5-6 inches across and 1/4 inch thick.

Lightly brush the rounds with some olive oil and sorinkle generously with the zaatar spice.

Bake each circle for 4 minutes until the bread puffs up. Turn over and bake for 2 minutes.

Remove each pita with a spatula from the baking sheet and add additional pitas for baking.

Take spatula and gently push down puff. Immediately place in storage bags.

Storing Pita Bread:

Pita bread can be stored for up to a week in a pantry or bread box, and up to a month in the freezer. Be sure to use freezer bags when storing in the freezer.

Pita bread dough can also be refrigerated for up to one week in the refrigerator.

Buy Kosher Zaatar Here:

Or You Can Make it from scratch:

Two Zaatar spice mix recipes to choose from:

Combine salt,thyme , marjoram, oregano leaves, sumac and sesame seeds in a medium mixing bowl. Sumac is a dark red berry that grows on bushes throughout the Middle East and some parts of Italy. Sumac is sold ground or in dried seed form and can be found at most Middle Eastern markets, or can be ordered from an online specialty company. Store in a dry container until use.

When ready to serve, add the olive oil to the mixture to form a paste. This paste is the zaatar mixture.

1-

  • 1/4 cup sumac
  • 2 tablespoons thyme
  • 1 tablespoon roasted sesame seeds
  • 2 tablespoons marjoram
  • 2 tablespoons oregano
  • 1 teaspoon coarse salt

or:

2-

  • 3 parts toasted sesame seeds
  • - some recipes call for one part  toasted sesame seeds. -it really depends on your tastebuds!
  • 2 parts dried thyme
  • 2 part dried marjoram
  • 2 part oregano
  • 1/2 – 1 part powdered sumac salt, optional
  • coarse salt to taste

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Make Your Own Greek Yogurt-Video

kosher dairy recipes, kosher recipes

Make Your Own Greek Yogurt-Video

2 Comments 01 April 2010

Mark Bittman has done it again.

This DIY greek yogurt is yummy with the Syrian spice zaatar, olive oil, lemon, and salt sprinkled in.

Serve with Matzoh crackers  (or pita chips after  Passover), of course with a dairy lunch.  Spending many summers by my in-laws home in New Jersey, I can still see the blob of yogurt  inside the tied handkerchief  that was dangling over the sink. Its always considered a delicacy for the family, and my mother-in-law still drops off a batch of home-made yogurt every so often. The time has come for me to start making it myself!!  Watch the video and PLEASE send in pictures if you decide to make it yourself!!

Reprint from the New York Times

THE so-called Greek yogurt that has become popular in recent years is neither a special kind of yogurt nor uniquely Greek. It’s simply yogurt from which much of the water has been removed, a concoction that in its thickest form can be called yogurt cheese. You can find yogurt cheese in every country that has a history of yogurt making. In addition to being thicker and richer when eaten straight, it makes superior spreads and dips.It can be made at home from ordinary yogurt, and its consistency can be varied: it can be similar to sour cream, crème fraîche, or mayonnaise, for which it’s a good substitute, or it can be thick enough to cut with a knife.

Producing yogurt cheese is quite simple. It takes a couple of hours, but your presence is required only for minutes. All you do is strain some of the water out of yogurt, until it reaches the thickness you want. For straining, I recommend a colander or coarse strainer lined with a clean cotton dish towel of fairly fine weave, what used to be called flour sack. (Many recipes suggest the use of cheesecloth, but you’d have to use about 10 layers for the same results.) Dump a quart (or whatever quantity you like) of yogurt in there, set the colander over a bowl in the refrigerator, twist or tie the top of the towel, and wait.

To speed the process, squeeze every now and then, or don’t bother. When the yogurt has reached the consistency of sour cream, twist and squeeze once more and scoop out the yogurt, which will have been reduced in volume by about half. (I suppose you could save and drink the yogurt-water, or cook with it, but I don’t.) Store the thickened yogurt in a covered container and use it within a week or so for best quality.

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